Current Ocd News and Events

Current Ocd News and Events, Ocd News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 7 | 249 Results
Common neural circuit and potential target for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder
Anxiety disorders are the most frequent comorbid conditions with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Yet the shared neural substrates and the common effective therapeutic target remain unknown. Scientists at School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University dissect a common glutamatergic neuronal circuit, from the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PrL) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core, involved in both anxiety- and obsessive-compulsive-like behaviors. Targeting histamine H3 heteroreceptor in the terminals of glutamatergic PrL-NAc core projections improves stress-induced anxiety- and obsessive-compulsive-like behaviors. (2020-12-02)

COVID-19 triggers OCD in children and young people
Many children and young people with obsessive thoughts and compulsions experience that their OCD, anxiety and depressive symptoms worsen during a crisis such as COVID-19. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus University and the Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Denmark Region. The findings have been published in BMC Psychiatry. (2020-11-09)

Cannabis reduces OCD symptoms by half in the short-term
People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) report that the severity of symptoms was reduced by about half within four hours of smoking cannabis. After smoking cannabis, users with OCD reported it reduced their compulsions by 60%, intrusions, or unwanted thoughts, by 49% and anxiety by 52%. The study also found that higher doses and cannabis with higher concentrations of CBD were associated with larger reductions in compulsions. (2020-10-20)

Cognitive behavioral therapy normalizes brain abnormality in OCD patients
UCLA scientists and colleagues studying the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) discovered an abnormality in the brains of people with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) that may help to predict who is most likely to respond to CBT. (2020-10-13)

Which OCD treatment works best? New brain study could lead to more personalized choices
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them - something that eludes more than a third of those who currently get OCD treatment. The study suggests the possibility of predicting which of two types of therapy will help people with OCD: One that exposes them to the subject of their obsessive thoughts and behaviors, or one that focuses on stress reduction and problem-solving. (2020-08-28)

Yale scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD
Yale scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders, or PANDAS, were first proposed in the 1990s. Thought to be triggered by streptococcal infections, they account for an unknown portion of youth OCD cases. But the biology underpinning this disorder has baffled scientists. (2020-06-16)

Antibodies could provide new treatment for OCD
Mental health conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder could be treated in a new way using drugs that target the immune system, research suggests. (2020-04-21)

An updated overview of the complex clinical spectrum of tourette syndrome
Background: Tourette syndrome is a common nerve development disorder which is characterized by a variety of muscle or vocal movements called 'tics', often involuntary. The disorder is reflectively and quite erroneously associated by many as a just syndrome with tics and the frequent use of undesirable language (swearing). However, Tourette syndrome is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with several serious comorbidities justifying the quite recent term of 'Tourette disorder' in place of the known Tourette syndrome'. (2020-04-06)

Unwanted behaviour in dogs is common, with great variance between breeds
All dog breeds have unwanted behaviour, such as noise sensitivity, aggressiveness and separation anxiety, but differences in frequency between breeds are great. Various unwanted behaviour traits often occur simultaneously, as indicated by a study recently completed by Professor Hannes Lohi's research group from the University of Helsinki. (2020-03-06)

Excellent long-term stability of treatment gains of stepwise treatment for pediatric OCD
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that the long-term stability of treatment gains for children and adolescents diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), participating in a stepwise manualized treatment, is excellent. (2020-02-27)

Distrust of past experience may underlie obsessive-compulsive symptoms
People with higher obsessive-compulsive symptoms may place less trust in their past experience, leading to increased uncertainty, indecisiveness, and exploratory behaviors, according to new research presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Isaac Fradkin of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and colleagues. (2020-02-27)

TMS shows promise in treating stroke, dementia and migraines
TMS shows promise in treating a broad range of neurological disorders, including stroke, dementia and migraines. (2020-02-24)

New insights into how the human brain solves complex decision-making problems
A research team, led by Professor Sang Wan Lee at KAIST jointly with John O'Doherty at Caltech, succeeded in discovering both a computational and neural mechanism for human meta reinforcement learning, opening up thea possibility offor porting key elements of human intelligence into artificial intelligence algorithms. (2020-01-30)

Contaminating a fake rubber hand could help people overcome OCD, study suggests
The famous, but bizarre, 'rubber hand illusion' could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder overcome their condition without the often unbearable stress of exposure therapy, suggests new research. (2020-01-09)

University of Cincinnati research looks at side effects for pediatric medications
Dr. Jeffrey Strawn, associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and Jeffrey Mills, associate professor in the Department of Economics at the UC Lindner College of Business, published a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry looking specifically at side effects that impact children and adolescents being treated for anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). (2019-12-10)

Standard treatment programmes for OCD are not always enough
Teenagers with the contamination and washing variant of OCD are not generally more ill than children and adolescents with other forms of disabling obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour. However, if they have poor insight into their condition, they find it more difficult to recover and become healthy again as a result of the 14-week cognitive behavioural therapy, which is the standard form of treatment in Denmark for OCD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. (2019-11-18)

Scientists discover link between unique brain cells and OCD and anxiety
In a new study, University of Utah scientists discovered a new lineage of specialized brain cells, called Hoxb8-lineage microglia, and established a link between the lineage and OCD and anxiety in mice. Their experiments proved that Hoxb8-lineage microglia prevent mice from displaying OCD behaviors. Additionally, they found that female sex hormones caused more severe OCD behaviors and induced added anxiety in the mice. (2019-10-22)

BARseq builds a better brain map
A brain mapping technique called BARseq is capable of mapping thousands of neurons in a single mouse, at single neuron resolution, while also detailing which neuron expresses what genes. It could be a game-changer for how neuroscientists look at brains. (2019-10-17)

New research raises important questions on how mental illness is currently diagnosed
This research raises questions as to whether current diagnoses accurately reflect the underlying neurobiology of mental illness. The findings, just published in the leading peer-reviewed medical journal, JAMA Psychiatry, highlight the need for more individualised approaches to defining mental illness. (2019-10-09)

Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities
Research from Cass Business School finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities. (2019-09-12)

Deep magnet stimulation shown to improve symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder
Researchers have found that focusing powerful non-invasive magnet stimulation on a specific brain area can improve the symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). This opens the way to treat the large minority of sufferers who do not respond to conventional treatment. The work is presented at the ECNP Conference in Copenhagen. (2019-09-07)

Presence of hoarding symptoms does not negatively impact CBT response in youth with OCD
Hoarding can often be a debilitating problem for adults and is often associated with poorer mental health functioning and response to treatment. For children however, that may not be the case. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reveals that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be successful for youth with hoarding symptoms. (2019-07-23)

Between 16 and 18% of preadolescents have ideas of suicide
Thinking of taking one's own life (ideation), planning it, threatening to do it or even attempting to do it is regarded as suicidal behaviour. Committing suicide has occurred to 16-18% of the preadolescent boys and girls who took part in a study carried out by the research group Nutrition and Mental Health (Nutrisam) of the URV, who aimed to assess the frequency with which this occurred and the main causes. (2019-07-11)

Can cannabinoids help treat obsessive-compulsive disorder?
The body's endocannabinoid system, due to the critical role it plays in regulating neurotransmitter signaling, is an enticing target for drug development against disorders associated with anxiety, stress, and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A comprehensive new review article that provides an overview of this complex system, endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids, results of animal studies and human trials to date, and recommendations for future directions is published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. (2019-05-31)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder research needs more focus on patients, new study asserts
In a review of recent literature on obsessive-compulsive disorder, researcher/practitioner Professor Adam Radomsky writes that cognitive science is becoming further and further removed from the people those studies are supposed to help: OCD patients and the therapists who treat them. (2019-05-23)

Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders
Results of a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT). (2019-05-21)

Brain researchers seek 'fingerprints' of severe mental diseases
McLean Hospital investigates brain network connectivity in patients with psychotic disorders. (2019-05-13)

Being too harsh on yourself could lead to OCD and anxiety
A new study has found that people who reported intense feelings of responsibility were susceptible to developing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) was published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. (2019-04-25)

Harmonization of resting-state functional MRI data across multiple imaging sites
Harmonization method developed to reduce site-related differences between neuroimaging data from individual imaging sites and publicly released big data of multiple psychiatric disorders from many imaging sites. (2019-04-18)

Advances in deep brain stimulation could lead to new treatments
A new paper published in Nature Reviews Neurology suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and depression. The authors of the paper argue that bi-directional electrodes which can both stimulate and record from deep brain structures -- known as closed-loop DBS -- could have applications beyond Parkinson disease. (2019-04-08)

Deep stimulation improves cognitive control by augmenting brain rhythms
Team's findings could provide neurosurgeons and psychiatrists with the reliable, objective and rapid feedback they've needed to properly fine-tune the placement and 'dosage' of DBS electrical stimulation when seeking to treat psychiatric disorders. (2019-04-04)

Deep brain stimulation sites for OCD target distinct symptoms
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces symptoms of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during stimulation of either the ventral capsule (VC) or anteromedial subthalamic nucleus (amSTN), according to a study in Biological Psychiatry. (2019-03-07)

Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity in the cortex in OCD patients
Scientists identify alterations of neuronal connectivity distributed throughout different regions of the cerebral cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder. This fact could explain the presence of intrusive thoughts in this patient population as a result of inefficient sensory filtering. (2019-02-27)

A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain
Serious diseases are directly linked to the subcortical areas of the brain. Existing treatments for regulating and measuring the activity of the subcortical areas are highly invasive. Researchers from UNIGE decided to see whether a noninvasive method -- electroencephalography -- could be employed in tandem with mathematical algorithms to measure this brain activity externally. They proved for the first time that this technique is able to record signals usually only seen by implanting electrodes in the brain. (2019-02-27)

Obsessive compulsive symptoms in youth may a red flag for other psychological issues
Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is part of typical child development. However, behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms may represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions. (2019-01-04)

Stuck in a loop of wrongness: Brain study shows roots of OCD
No one knows what drives people with obsessive-compulsive disorder to do what they do, even when they're aware that they shouldn't do it, and when it interferes with normal life. That lack of understanding means about half can't find effective treatment. But a new analysis of brain scans from hundreds of people with OCD, and people without it, may help. Larger than previous studies, it pinpoints brain areas and processes linked to OCD's repetitive behaviors. (2018-11-29)

Brain training app helps reduce OCD symptoms, study finds
A 'brain training' app developed at the University of Cambridge could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) manage their symptoms, which may typically include excessive handwashing and contamination fears. (2018-10-23)

Most people don't know the difference between OCD and OCPD
The general public has trouble understanding differences between obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-10-15)

New Tourette disorder genes come to light
In the largest DNA sequencing study of Tourette Disorder (TD) to date, UC San Francisco researchers and their collaborators have unearthed new data suggesting a potential role for disruptions in cell polarity in the development of this condition. (2018-09-25)

Living in areas with less sun may increase your risk of OCD
Living at higher latitudes, where there is also less sunlight, could result in a higher prevalence rate of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2018-07-10)

Page 1 of 7 | 249 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.