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Current Ocean Acidification News and Events

Current Ocean Acidification News and Events, Ocean Acidification News Articles.
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New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions, prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms. (2020-05-28)
Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice
Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study. (2020-05-28)
Stronger tropical cyclones strengthen the Kuroshio Current, further heating high latitudes
As the intensity and frequency of the strongest cyclones east of Taiwan have increased, so has the strength of the Kuroshio current, a Pacific current responsible for redistributing heat throughout the western North Pacific Ocean. (2020-05-28)
Search-and-rescue algorithm identifies hidden'traps' in ocean waters
Researchers at MIT, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and Virginia Tech have developed a technique that they hope will help first responders quickly zero in on regions of the sea where missing objects or people are likely to be. (2020-05-27)
HKU ecologists and international team discover ongoing and future tropical diversity decline
How can patterns in the marine biodiversity of the past help us to understand how it may change in the future? (2020-05-26)
Mathematics can save lives at sea
An international research collaboration led by ETH Zurich and MIT has developed a mathematical method that can speed up search and rescue operations at sea. (2020-05-26)
The deep ocean is warming slowly -- but dramatic changes are ahead
The world's deep oceans are warming at a slower rate than the surface, but it's still not good news for deep-sea creatures according to an international study. (2020-05-25)
There is no escaping from climate change, even in the deep sea
Even though the deeper layers of the ocean are warming at a slower pace than the surface, animals living in the deep ocean are more exposed to climate warming and will face increasing challenges to maintain their preferred thermal habitats in the future. (2020-05-25)
Towable sensor free-falls to measure vertical slices of ocean conditions
Towable sensor free-falls to measure vertical slices of ocean conditions. (2020-05-21)
NASA-NOAA satellite catches post-tropical storm Arthur's end
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Post Tropical Storm Arthur. (2020-05-20)
Study: Ancient ocean oxygen levels associated with changing atmospheric carbon dioxide
Why do carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere wax and wane in conjunction with the warm and cold periods of Earth's past? (2020-05-20)
How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. (2020-05-18)
New study projects ocean warming impact on Antarctic krill
Ocean warming is likely to alter the distribution and lifecycle of ecologically and commercially important Antarctic krill over the rest of this century, according to new IMAS-led research. (2020-05-18)
Chromium speciation in marine carbonates and implications on atmospheric oxygenation
Qin and colleagues examined chromium (Cr) valence states in sedimentary carbonates and found that Cr(III) dominates in all samples formed in different geological periods. (2020-05-15)
Sea skaters are a super source of inspiration
A study of marine Halobates species highlights how their waterproofing techniques, size and acceleration capability helped them colonize the ocean. (2020-05-15)
Ocean 'breathability' key to past, future habitat of West Coast marine species
Ocean breathability, which combines the oxygen levels, a species' oxygen needs and the water temperature, matches the shifts in northern anchovy populations from the 1950s to today. (2020-05-15)
Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. (2020-05-14)
Researchers reveal largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth--Pūhāhonu, a volcano within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (2020-05-14)
Marine waste management: Recycling efficiency by marine microbes
It was only relatively recently that tiny, single-celled thaumarchaea were discovered to exist and thrive in the pelagic ocean, where their population size of roughly 1028 (10 billion quintillion) cells makes them one of the most abundant organisms on our planet. (2020-05-12)
Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity. (2020-05-08)
Going against the trend
Global warming has affected the entire planet's surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which has bucked the trend. (2020-05-06)
Climate change could reawaken Indian Ocean El Niño
Global warming is approaching a tipping point that during this century could reawaken an ancient climate pattern similar to El Niño in the Indian Ocean, new research led by scientists from the University of Texas at Austin has found. (2020-05-06)
URI professor: Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries. (2020-05-04)
Study: Climate change has been influencing where tropical cyclones rage
While the global average number of tropical cyclones each year has not budged from 86 over the last four decades, climate change has been influencing the locations of where these deadly storms occur, according to new NOAA-led research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (2020-05-04)
Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (2020-05-04)
Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance
CU Boulder researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. (2020-05-01)
Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
Microbial life is bubbling up to the ocean floor along with fluids from deeply buried petroleum reservoirs, reports a team of scientists from the University of Calgary and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. (2020-05-01)
Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed. (2020-04-30)
Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter. (2020-04-30)
Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
A team of international scientists has shown the species, first seen off the coast of Cyprus in 2012, is now thriving and well-established right across southern Europe (2020-04-28)
Using cloud-precipitation relationship to estimate cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones
Scientists find the cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones can be estimated by a notable sigmoid function of near-surface rain rate. (2020-04-27)
Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of 'health check-ups' on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals. (2020-04-27)
Assessing El Niño's impact on fisheries and aquaculture around the world
New report presents the main regional consequences caused by the five types of the climate pattern. (2020-04-24)
Researchers explore ocean microbes' role in climate effects
A new study shows that 'hotspots' of nutrients surrounding phytoplankton -- which are tiny marine algae producing approximately half of the oxygen we breathe every day -- play an outsized role in the release of a gas involved in cloud formation and climate regulation. (2020-04-23)
Dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during industrial era
There has been a dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during the 20th century, in contrast to thousands of years of stability, according to a new UCL-led study. (2020-04-23)
Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life. (2020-04-23)
Dissolved oxygen and pH policy leave fisheries at risk
In a Policy Forum, ''Dissolved oxygen and pH criteria leave fisheries at risk'' published in the April 24 issue of the journal Science, Stony Brook University's Dr. (2020-04-23)
More protections needed to safeguard biodiversity in the Southern Ocean
Current marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean need to be at least doubled to adequately safeguard the biodiversity of the Antarctic, according to a new CU Boulder study. (2020-04-22)
Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern. (2020-04-21)
North pole will be ice-free in summer
Summer Arctic sea-ice is predicted to disappear before 2050, resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem. (2020-04-21)
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