Current Oceanic Crust News and Events

Current Oceanic Crust News and Events, Oceanic Crust News Articles.
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Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material. (2021-02-19)

Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators
Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research, led by Newcastle University and published in in the journal Science Advances, has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean. (2021-02-19)

Vaporised crusts of Earth-like planets found in dying stars
Remnants of planets with Earth-like crusts have been discovered in the atmospheres of four nearby white dwarf stars by University of Warwick astronomers, offering a glimpse of the planets that may have once orbited them up to billions of years ago. (2021-02-11)

Seismic surveys using fin whale songs
Fin whale song - one of the strongest animal calls in the ocean - can be used as a seismic source for probing the structure of Earth's crust at the seafloor, researchers report. (2021-02-11)

No new mountains formed during Earth's middle age, halting life's evolution for an eon
During the Proterozoic, Earth grew no taller - the tectonic processes that form mountains stalled, leaving continents devoid of high mountains for nearly 1 billion years, according to a new study. (2021-02-11)

The songs of fin whales offer new avenue for seismic studies of the oceanic crust
The songs of fin whales can be used for seismic imaging of the oceanic crust, providing scientists a novel alternative to conventional surveying. (2021-02-11)

Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements
Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements. (2021-02-09)

An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s
An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s. (2021-02-08)

Scientists discover ocean 'surface slicks' are nurseries for diverse fishes
Ocean features called surface slicks are an interconnected superhighway of nursery habitat for more than 100 species of fishes from diverse ocean habitats. (2021-02-04)

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

Geological phenomenon widening the Atlantic Ocean
An upsurge of matter from deep beneath the Earth's crust could be pushing the continents of North and South America further apart from Europe and Africa, new research has found. (2021-01-27)

Upper ocean temperatures hit record high in 2020
The ocean temperatures continued a trend of breaking records in 2020. A new study, authored by 20 scientists from 13 institutes around the world, reported the highest ocean temperatures since 1955 from surface level to a depth of 2,000 meters. (2021-01-13)

New study of Earth's crust shows global growth spurt three billion years ago
Curtin University researchers have used ancient crystals from eroded rocks found in stream sediments in Greenland to successfully test the theory that portions of Earth's ancient crust acted as 'seeds' from which later generations of crust grew. (2021-01-12)

Construction of carbon-based cell-like-spheres for robust potassium anode
Inspired by the structure of a biological cell, biomimetic carbon cells (BCCs) were synthesized and used as potassium ion batteries (PIBs) anodes. The unique structural characteristics of the BCCs resulted in PIBs that showed a high reversible capacity, excellent cycle stability and rate performance. The present strategy provides a new way for the design and manufacture of new biomimetic battery materials in the future, and promotes collaborative research across multiple disciplines. (2021-01-09)

The revelation of the crustal geometry of the western Qilian Mountains, NE Tibetan Plateau
The western Qilian Mountains in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is an ideal place to test the crustal deformation mechanisms of the plateau. The study revealed the detailed crustal deformation pattern in the junction of western Qilian Mountains and the Jiuxi Corridor. This result has a great significant to understand the crustal deformation of the plateau. This study was reported in the SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences. (2021-01-06)

Pollutants rapidly changing the waters near Ieodo Island
Professor Kitack Lee's research team identifies the cause of ocean fertilization in northeast Asian waters. (2021-01-04)

New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
University of Tsukuba researchers constructed a state-of-the-art model based on seismic data from the January 2020 Caribbean earthquake. The model revealed considerable complexity in rupture speed and direction, related to a bend in the fault that triggered several rupture episodes. The analysis revealed previously unrecognized complexity of rupture processes and fault geometry in ocean faults that had been assumed to be simple and linear, with implications for future earthquake modeling and a possible interaction with seafloor evolution. (2020-12-21)

Secret of Australia's volcanoes revealed
New research from the University of Sydney proposes a theory that explains not only Australia's volcanic coast, but provides a framework for other incidences of intraplate volcanism in China, the US and the Caribbean. (2020-12-16)

Male bats with high testosterone levels have large forearm crusts when females are fertile
Mammalian odors are frequently sexually dimorphic, with males often exhibiting a stronger, or otherwise distinct, odor relative to females, which can be especially useful for nocturnal species with reduced use of vision. Some male bats exhibit intense odors to attract females and reproduce, presumably as a consequence of a high concentration of testosterone. (2020-12-15)

Weathered microplastic particles, readily internalized by mouse cells, may pose a greater risk than pristine ones
Microplastic particles exposed to freshwater or saltwater environments for several weeks are about 10 times more likely than pristine particles to be absorbed by mouse cells, due to a crust of microorganisms and biomolecules that forms on the particles' surfaces, according to a new study. The results indicate that this crust acts as a biomolecular 'Trojan horse.' (2020-12-09)

New study helps pinpoint when earth's plate subduction began
According to findings published Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances, plate subduction could have started 3.75 billion years ago, reshaping Earth's surface and setting the stage for a planet hospitable to life. (2020-12-09)

Newly discovered Greenland plume drives thermal activities in the Arctic
A team of researchers understands more about the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. They discovered a flow of hot rocks, known as a mantle plume, rising from the core-mantle boundary beneath central Greenland that melts the ice from below. (2020-12-07)

Continents prone to destruction in their infancy, study finds
Monash University geologists have shed new light on the early history of the Earth through their discovery that continents were weak and prone to destruction in their infancy. (2020-12-02)

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continents
Geoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas -- and the exact shapes that land masses formed -- have so far eluded experts. (2020-12-01)

Electronic waste on the decline, new study finds
A new study, led by a researcher at the Yale School of the Environment's Center for Industrial Ecology and published recently in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, has found that the total mass of electronic waste generated by Americans has been declining since 2015. This surprising finding has ramifications for both how we think about electronic waste's future and for the laws and regulations regarding e-waste recycling, according to the study's authors. (2020-12-01)

A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers. (2020-11-30)

Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow. Just-published research details how an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs, taking the place of coral that was damaged by extreme storms and exacerbating the damage caused by ocean acidification, disease, pollution, and bleaching. (2020-11-30)

Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase D
Researchers at Ehime University have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's deep mantle. Their results suggest that seismic shear anomalies observed locally beneath subduction zones may reveal the presence of hydrous minerals in the uppermost lower mantle, which would have important implications for the Earth's interior because hydrogen affects considerably the physical and chemical properties of mantle minerals. (2020-11-30)

Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution
Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution (2020-11-25)

Ancient zircon minerals from Mars reveal the elusive internal structure of the red planet
Analysis of an ancient meteorite from Mars suggests that the mineral zircon may be abundant on the surface of the red planet. By determining the age and hafnium isotope composition of these zircons, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown that a population of these crystals were sourced from the deep interior of Mars. If the researchers are correct, it means that the young zircons contain information about the deep, inaccessible interior of Mars, which provides insights into the internal structure of the planet. (2020-11-17)

Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes. (2020-11-17)

Large predatory fish thrive on WWII shipwrecks off North Carolina coast
Results of an expedition to a sunken U-boat and Nicaraguan freighter, published this week in Ecosphere, offer a detailed glimpse into unexpected ''islands of habitat.'' (2020-11-17)

A sweeping climate model of the Red Sea
An all-inclusive climate model for the entire Red Sea region is supporting Saudi Arabia's plans for a sustainable future. (2020-11-16)

The connectivity of multicomponent fluids in subduction zones
A team of researchers has discovered more about the grain-scale fluid connectivity beneath the earth's surface, shedding new light on fluid circulation and seismic velocity anomalies in subduction zones. (2020-11-12)

COVID-delayed Arctic research cruise yields late-season data
Researchers studying the Bering and Chukchi seas for three weeks in October found no ice and a surprisingly active ecosystem as they added another year's data to a key climate change record. The research vessel Norseman II carried scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Clark University. (2020-11-11)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

Magma 'conveyor belt' fuelled world's longest erupting supervolcanoes
International research led by geologists from Curtin University has found that a volcanic province in the Indian Ocean was the world's most continuously active -- erupting for 30 million years -- fuelled by a constantly moving 'conveyor belt' of magma. (2020-11-03)

Water on ancient Mars
A meteorite that originated on Mars billions of years ago reveals details of ancient impact events on the red planet. Certain minerals from the Martian crust in the meteorite are oxidized, suggesting the presence of water during the impact that created the meteorite. The finding helps to fill some gaps in knowledge about the role of water in planet formation. (2020-10-30)

SwRI study offers more complete view of massive asteroid Psyche
A new study authored by Southwest Research Institute planetary scientist Dr. Tracy Becker discusses several new views of the asteroid 16 Psyche, including the first ultra-violet observations. The study, which was published today in The Planetary Science Journal and presented at the virtual meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences, paints a clearer view of the asteroid than was previous-ly available. (2020-10-26)

Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move. This is what scientists from the LGL-TPE (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/UCBL1) have recently discovered. Their new model takes into account not only the velocity of seismic waves but also the way in which they are attenuated by the medium they pass through. The velocity of tectonic plates near the surface is thus directly correlated with the quantity of magma present. (2020-10-21)

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