Current Oceanography News and Events

Current Oceanography News and Events, Oceanography News Articles.
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Increasing hurricane intensity around Bermuda linked to rising ocean temperatures
New research shows that hurricane maximum wind speeds in the subtropical Atlantic around Bermuda have more than doubled on average over the last 60 years due to rising ocean temperatures in the region. (2021-02-12)

Marine organisms use previously undiscovered receptors to detect, respond to light
Single-celled organisms in the open ocean use a diverse array of newly discovered genetic tools to detect light, even in tiny amounts, and respond. (2021-02-01)

Scientists discover how the potentially oldest coral reefs in the Mediterranean developed
A new study from the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC, Spain) and the National Oceanography Centre brings unprecedented insights into the environmental constraints and climatic events that controlled the formation of the potentially oldest coral reefs in the Mediterranean. (2021-01-21)

Natural products with potential efficacy against lethal viruses
Researchers describe the biology of three families of RNA viruses including Coronavirus, Ebola, and Zika and the natural products that have been shown to have capabilities to inhibit them. The review provides a guide that could accelerate drug discovery in response to future epidemics. (2021-01-05)

Surveys identify relationship between waves, coastal cliff erosion
Researchers have always known that waves were an important part of the cliff erosion process, but they haven't been able to separate the influence of waves and rain before. After decades of debate over the differing roles that both play, new findings provide an opportunity to improve forecasts. (2020-12-28)

Biologists clarify how three species of cephalopods coexist in the Arctic
By analyzing the content of stable heavy isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in the beaks, the researchers studied three closely related cephalopod species: the highly boreal Rossia megaptera, the wide-boreal-Arctic Rossia palpebrosa, and the Arctic endemic Rossia moelleri, which are sympatric in the Arctic. (2020-12-15)

Characterising complex flows in 2D bubble swarms
Research published in EPJ E shows that in 2D simulated fluids, upward-flowing swarms of bubbles, a mathematical relationship describing the nature of flows in their wake, previously thought to be universal, actually changes within larger-scale flows in less viscous fluids. (2020-12-04)

Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water's boiling point
Research published today in the journal Science found single-celled organisms living in sediments 1180 meters beneath the ocean at temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius (2020-12-03)

Letter from leading researchers urges terminology update, shift in COVID-19 guidance
Scientists affiliated with leading research institutions across the United States state in a letter published Monday in the journal Science that researchers across disciplines must converge to deliver clear public health guidance about how SARS-CoV-2 is spread in the air. (2020-10-05)

Kawasaki disease is not a homogenous disease nor are its triggers
Researchers at UC San Diego report that while Kawasaki disease occurs in clusters, the traits, and thus the triggers of the inflammatory disease vary among clusters. (2020-09-29)

Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
New research from the University of Washington shows that a wide variety of marine animals -- from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks -- already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may not be in the future. (2020-09-16)

How to predict a typhoon
An international team of researchers has developed a model that analyzes nearly a quarter of Earth's surface and atmosphere in order to better predict the conditions that birth typhoons, as well as the conditions that lead to more severe storms. (2020-08-04)

Deep sea microbes dormant for 100 million years are hungry and ready to multiply
In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers reveal that given the right food in the right laboratory conditions, microbes collected from subseafloor sediment as old as 100 million years can revive and multiply, even after laying dormant since large dinosaurs prowled the planet. (2020-07-28)

16 new papers describe discoveries at long-term deep-sea research site off California
A recent special issue of the journal Deep-Sea Research II features 16 new papers about MBARI's long-term, deep-sea research site Station M. (2020-06-16)

Can deep water masses in the Mediterranean cross the Sicily Strait?
The Sicily Strait, an underwater relief connecting the Italian island with the Tunisian coasts, is not a geological barrier for the deep water circulation between eastern and western Mediterranean -which was always thought to be. Quite the contrary, the contribution of the eastern Mediterranean deep water flow towards the western one can reach 70%, according to a study recently published in the journal Process in Oceanography. (2020-06-05)

The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
The most common organism in the world's oceans -- and possibly the whole planet -- harbors a virus in its DNA. This virus may have helped it survive and outcompete other organisms. (2020-05-29)

What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish. (2020-05-18)

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)

Ocean 'breathability' key to past, future habitat of West Coast marine species
Ocean breathability, which combines the oxygen levels, a species' oxygen needs and the water temperature, matches the shifts in northern anchovy populations from the 1950s to today. Under climate change, this key forage fish may no longer be able to survive in the southern part of its range, off Mexico and southern California. (2020-05-15)

Chilean scientists warn environmental costs of water roads
The interdisciplinary analysis presented this in Nature Sustaintability by researchers from four Chilean universities, recommends a global analysis in the design of these projects, reconciling the growing demand for water supply with the health of freshwater and marine ecosystems. (2020-05-02)

Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter. (2020-04-30)

Microplastics found in a quarter of San Diego estuary fish
Nearly a quarter of fish collected from a San Diego stream contain microplastics. The study, which examined plastics in coastal sediments and three species of fish, showed that the frequency and types of plastic ingested varied with fish species and, in some cases, size or age of fish. (2020-03-18)

New research first to relate Antarctic sea ice melt to weather change in tropics
While there is a growing body of research showing how the loss of Arctic sea ice affects other parts of the planet, a new study is the first to also consider the long-range effect of Antarctic sea ice melt. It estimates that Arctic and Antarctic ice loss will account for about one-fifth of the warming that is projected to happen in the tropics. (2020-03-16)

Earth's mantle, not its core, may have generated planet's Early magnetic field
A trio of studies are the latest developments in a paradigm shift that could change how Earth history is understood. They support an assertion by a Scripps Institution of Oceanography geophysicist that a once-liquid portion of the lower mantle, rather than the core, could have exceeded the thresholds needed to create Earth's magnetic field during its early history. (2020-03-15)

Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities. They determined that in regions containing very low levels of oxygen (7 μmol/kg of oxygen or less), fish diversity declined dramatically. (2020-03-05)

FSU researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle
As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle. (2020-03-05)

Reef-building coral exhibiting 'disaster traits' akin to the last major extinction event
A new study in Scientific Reports shows that stony corals, which provide food and shelter for almost a quarter of all ocean species, are preparing for a major extinction event. Researchers identified an increased prevalence of 5 traits associated with previous extinction-survival responses among corals. (2020-03-03)

Warming oceans are getting louder (audio available)
One of the ocean's loudest creatures is smaller than you'd expect -- and will get even louder and more troublesome to humans and sea life as the ocean warms, according to new research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020. (2020-02-18)

Warming, acidic oceans may nearly eliminate coral reef habitats by 2100
Rising sea surface temperatures and acidic waters could eliminate nearly all existing coral reef habitats by 2100, suggesting restoration projects in these areas will likely meet serious challenges, according to new research presented today at the Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020. (2020-02-17)

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study. (2020-01-17)

New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters
A study led by the University of Southampton has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate - a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables. (2020-01-15)

The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas
Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology & Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems. (2020-01-08)

Collaborative conservation approach for endangered reef fish yields dramatic results
A new study from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego has documented a successful recovery effort among Nassau Grouper populations in the Cayman Islands thanks to an approach involving government agencies, academic researchers, and nonprofit organizations. (2020-01-06)

Where do baby sea turtles go? New research technique may provide answers
A team of Florida researchers and their collaborators created a first-of-its-kind computer model that tracks where sea turtle hatchlings go after they leave Florida's shores, giving scientists a new tool to figure out where young turtles spend their 'lost years.' (2019-12-23)

Evidence: Antarctica's thinning ice shelves causing more ice to move from land into sea
New study provides the first evidence that thinning ice shelves around Antarctica are causing more ice to move from the land into the sea. (2019-12-02)

Animals could help humans monitor oceans
Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. (2019-11-27)

Researchers report first recording of a blue whale's heart rate
With a lot of ingenuity and a little luck, researchers monitored the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild. The measurement suggests that blue whale hearts are operating at extremes -- and may limit the whale's size. (2019-11-25)

Investigation of oceanic 'black carbon' uncovers mystery in global carbon cycle
An unexpected finding published today in Nature Communications challenges a long-held assumption about the origin of oceanic black coal, and introduces a tantalizing new mystery: If oceanic black carbon is significantly different from the black carbon found in rivers, where did it come from? (2019-11-07)

Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population
Two new studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations southern New England to Atlantic Canada. (2019-10-24)

Preparing for the future
Santa Barbara County residents love their coastline, from the small-town beaches of Carpinteria to Santa Barbara's waterfront to camping hotspots like Jalama Beach and dramatic Guadalupe Dunes. But drastic changes are in store in coming decades as temperatures and sea levels rise, bringing massive impacts to local ecology and human systems. (2019-09-30)

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