Current Oceanography News and Events | Page 2

Current Oceanography News and Events, Oceanography News Articles.
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New study measures how much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting
When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren't creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby. (2019-09-17)

Deepwater horizon oil buried in gulf coast beaches could take decades to biodegrade
Golf ball-size clods of weathered crude oil originating from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon catastrophe could remain buried in sandy Gulf Coast beaches for decades, according to a new study by ecologists at Florida State University. (2019-09-10)

Kīlauea lava fuels phytoplankton bloom off Hawai'i Island
When Kīlauea Volcano erupted in 2018, it injected millions of cubic feet of molten lava into the nutrient-poor waters off the Big Island of Hawai'i. A study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and University of Southern California revealed that extensive phytoplankton growth was stimulated when nitrate was brought to the surface ocean as the lava warmed nutrient-rich deep waters and caused them to become buoyant. (2019-09-05)

New study tracks sulfur-based metabolism in the open ocean
Oceanographers found that marine microbes process sulfonate, a plentiful marine nutrient, in a way that is similar to soils. (2019-09-05)

Climate change will alter waves along half the world's coast
New research finds that a warming planet will also alter ocean waves along more than 50% of the world's coastlines. This research, published in Nature Climate Change, has significant implications for coastal flooding and erosion. (2019-08-22)

A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
The Maritime Archaeological Trust has discovered a new 8,000 year old structure 11 metres below sea level on the Isle of Wight. It is the most intact, wooden Middle Stone Age structure ever found in the UK. (2019-08-20)

A toxic chemical in marine ecosystems turns out to play a beneficial role
Destructive free radicals -- known as reactive oxygen species -- are thought to degrade the cells of phytoplankton and other organisms. A new paper, however, suggests that these molecules actually play a beneficial role, upending some conventional wisdom. (2019-07-22)

Correcting historic sea surface temperature measurements
Why did the oceans warm and cool at such different rates in the early 20th century? New research from Harvard University and the UK's National Oceanography Centre points to an answer both as mundane as a decimal point truncation and as complicated as global politics. Part history, part climate science, this research corrects decades of data and suggests that ocean warming occurred in a much more homogenous way. (2019-07-17)

Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
A UW team has discovered thriving communities of bacteria in Alaskan 'cryopegs,' trapped layers of sediment with water so salty that it remains liquid at below-freezing temperatures. The setting may be similar to environments on Mars, Saturn's moon Titan, or other bodies farther from the sun. (2019-07-12)

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. (2019-06-25)

New study shows how environmental disruptions affected ancient societies
A new study shows that over the past 10,000 years, humanity has experienced a number of foundational transitions, or 'bottlenecks.' During these periods of transition, the advance or decline of societies was related to energy availability in the form of a benign climate and other factors. (2019-06-18)

Boaty McBoatface mission gives new insight into warming ocean abyss
The first mission involving the autonomous submarine vehicle Autosub Long Range (better known as 'Boaty McBoatface') has for the first time shed light on a key process linking increasing Antarctic winds to rising sea temperatures. Data collected from the expedition, published today in the scientific journal PNAS, will help climate scientists build more accurate predictions of the effects of climate change on rising sea levels. (2019-06-17)

Mysterious holes in Antarctic sea ice explained by years of robotic data
Why did a giant hole appear in the sea ice off Antarctica in 2016 and 2017, after decades of more typical sea ice cover? Years of Southern Ocean data have explained the phenomenon, helping oceanographers to better predict these features and study their role in global ocean cycles. (2019-06-10)

Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior
Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviors of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute. (2019-05-20)

Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
In low-oxygen parts of the ocean, some microbes are surviving by getting energy from arsenic. This holdover from the ancient Earth was not known to still exist in the open ocean. (2019-05-01)

Lessons learnt from the drift analysis of MH370 debris
The Boeing 777 of Malaysia Airlines (MH370) has been missing for over five years. The extensive, costly, but unsuccessful search operations have stopped. A European research consortium under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research Kiel has helped by providing insights on the most probable crash site based on debris from the aircraft. In a new study, scientists synthesise what they have learnt and propose strategies for optimising future interdisciplinary work of this kind. (2019-04-17)

Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance
A study published in Nature Communications revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before. Further, as if these communities were all privy to the same schedule, these changes were synchronized across reefs separated by hundreds of miles. (2019-04-12)

Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans
Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds. Researchers report that shallow bodies of water, on the order of 10 centimeters deep, could have held high concentrations of what many scientists believe to be a key ingredient for jump-starting life on Earth: nitrogen. (2019-04-12)

Colonization in slow motion
There is a wide variety of animals living on the Arctic seabed. Attached to rocks, they feed by removing nutrients from the water using filters or tentacles. But it can take decades for these colonies to become established, and they probably don't achieve their natural diversity until much later. (2019-03-22)

Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (2019-03-21)

Evidence rogue waves are getting more extreme
Research led by the University of Southampton suggests that 'rogue' waves are occurring less often, but becoming more extreme. Scientists have, for the first time, used long-term data from a wide expanse of ocean to investigate how these rare, unexpected and hazardous ocean phenomena behave. Their findings are published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-03-20)

Study: Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones. Satellites should detect these changes in hue, providing early warning of wide-scale changes to marine ecosystems. (2019-02-04)

European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate
An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins. This upends prevailing ideas and may help scientists better predict Arctic ice melt and future changes in the ocean's ability to mitigate climate change by storing excess atmospheric carbon. (2019-01-31)

Waters west of Europe drive ocean overturning circulation, key for regulating climate
A new international study finds that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC), a deep-ocean process that plays a key role in regulating Earth's climate, is primarily driven by cooling waters west of Europe. (2019-01-31)

Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss
LSU Boyd Professor of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences R. Eugene Turner has determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands. Along with LSU alumna and now University of Central Florida Postdoctoral Fellow Giovanna McClenachan, Turner proposes a simple and inexpensive way to fill in canals that were once used for oil and gas mining. Their research was published recently in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-12-19)

Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain
The North Pacific Ocean is losing oxygen, pushing species significant to the marine ecosystem to shallower water where there's more sunlight, higher temperatures and greater risk of predators. (2018-12-19)

URI researchers: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life
Oceanographers at the University of Rhode Island have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton. (2018-12-19)

Hypoxic dead zones found in urban streams, not just at the coast
A Duke-led study finds that hypoxic dead zones occur in nutrient-laden urban streams, not just in coastal waters. The research shows that intense storm flows can erode some stream channels to become a series of pools that trap nutrient-laden runoff. The elevated nutrient levels in the water spur greater consumption of dissolved oxygen by bacteria, causing the pools to become hypoxic until the next storm flushes them out. (2018-12-11)

Tracing iron in the North Pacific
A new Chinese project (2018--2022) will explore the sources and transport of biologically available Fe in the high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The results can give scientific advice to stakeholders on the feasibility of conducting ocean Fe fertilization. (2018-11-30)

Too many fishers in the sea: The economic ceiling of artisanal fisheries
Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of British Columbia found that even if fishers used the most efficient and sustainable known practices, they wouldn't generate enough revenue to maintain a living above poverty level. (2018-10-31)

Earth's oceans have absorbed 60 percent more heat than previously thought
Since 1991, the world's oceans have absorbed an amount of heat energy each year that is 150 times the energy humans produce as electricity annually, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The strong ocean warming the researchers found suggests that Earth is more sensitive to fossil-fuel emissions than previously thought. (2018-10-31)

Sea science: Navy task force promotes increased knowledge of ocean environment
At the 2018 Oceans Conference, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. David Hahn discussed the goals of the US Navy's Task Force Ocean, a signature program of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson. TFO is designed to reinvigorate the Navy's commitment to ocean sciences, advancing its tactical advantage through a better knowledge of the ocean environment and its impact on sensors, weapons and operations. (2018-10-29)

Researchers challenge our assumptions on the effects of planetary rotation
The Coriolis effect impacts global patterns and currents, and its magnitude, relative to the magnitude of inertial forces, is expressed by the Rossby number. For over 100 years, scientists have believed that the higher this number, the less likely Coriolis effect influences oceanic or atmospheric events. Recently, however, researchers found that smaller ocean disturbances with high Rossby numbers are influenced by the Coriolis effect. Their discovery challenges assumptions of theoretical oceanography and geophysical fluid dynamics. (2018-09-28)

Scientists discover genetic basis for how harmful algal blooms become toxic
A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by harmful algal blooms. (2018-09-27)

Coastal researchers examine resource scarcity and poverty traps in coastal tanzania
Louisiana State University researchers are evaluating 13 different villages across the Pangani and Rufiji districts of Tanzania and analyzing the local mangrove ecosystems, including how humans influence and interact with these ecosystems. (2018-09-04)

Murky lakes now surpass clear, blue lakes in US
New research reveals that many lakes in the continental United States are becoming murkier, with potentially negative consequences for water quality and aquatic life. The findings are published in Limnology and Oceanography. (2018-08-22)

Good news for fishermen: Browning impacts fish less than expected
Water color is getting darker in lakes across the planet. This phenomenon, known as 'browning,' was anticipated to cause widespread declines in fish populations. A new study by researchers from Umeå University, Sweden, finds that the number of fish populations impacted by browning is smaller than previously believed. (2018-08-08)

Mapping blue carbon in mangroves worldwide
Mangroves are tropical forests that thrive in salt water and found in a variety of coastal settings worldwide. Mangroves store greater amounts of carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, which helps reduce carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. When carbon is stored in the ocean or coastal ecosystems, it is called blue carbon. However, a more precise estimate of how much blue carbon is stored by mangroves has not been available until recently. (2018-08-02)

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle
In a new study that challenges scientists' presuppositions about the carbon cycle, researchers find that tiny organisms may be playing in outside role in the way carbon is circulated throughout the ocean. (2018-07-18)

Following the fresh water
A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago. (2018-07-09)

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