Current Oncogene News and Events

Current Oncogene News and Events, Oncogene News Articles.
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Bacterial degradation of the MYC oncogene -- a new cancer treatment strategy?
Scientists at Lund University have discovered how E. coli bacteria target and degrade the well-known oncogene MYC, which is involved in many forms of cancer. The study is now published in Nature Biotechnology. (2021-02-12)

Stirring up conflicts in tumour cells
With two commercially available inhibitors, the cell cycle of the cancer cells in the childhood tumour neuroblastoma can be disrupted at a key point causing tumour cell death. (2021-02-11)

Breast cancer discovery could help stop disease's deadly spread
Researchers have identified a gene responsible for the spread of triple-negative breast cancer to other parts of the body and developed a potential way to stop it. (2020-11-20)

Oncotarget: Genomic markers of midostaurin drug sensitivity in leukemia patients
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 29 reported that acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous malignancy with the most common genomic alterations in NPM1, DNMT3A, and FLT3. Midostaurin was the first FLT3 inhibitor FDA approved for AML and is standard of care for FLT3 mutant patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. (2020-10-14)

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability of advanced prostate cancer cells that can be targeted by drugs. (2020-10-07)

New way to halt leukemia relapse shown promising in mice
Drugs tackling chronic myelogenous leukemia have completely transformed prognoses of patients over the last couple of decades, with most cases going into remission. But drug resistance can occur, leading to relapses. Targeting the lipids involved in regulating part of a leukemia stem cell's life span offers a potential second route to defeat the disease--and solid tumorous cancers as well. (2020-09-18)

Molecular basis underlying colorectal cancer revealed
A team of scientists has unraveled the molecular mechanism behind one of the causes of colorectal cancer, and a treatment target. (2020-09-15)

CNIO researchers develop an effective strategy against KRAS mutant lung tumors in mice
Researchers achieved complete remission of 25% of lung tumours caused by the KRAS oncogene in mice by inactivating CDK4 and RAF1, two genes that act at different levels in the signalling pathway of this oncogene. In addition, this therapeutic combination slows tumour growth in 100% of the cases. In spite of the high heterogeneity of these tumours, the team has managed to identify and therapeutically treat the different resistance mechanisms that can develop after inactivating both targets. (2020-09-08)

Extrachromosomal DNA is common in human cancer and drives poor patients outcomes
The multiplication of genes located in extrachromosomal DNA that have the potential to cause cancer drives poor patient outcomes across many cancer types, according to a Nature Genetics study published Aug. 17, 2020 by a Nature Genetics by a team of researchers including Professors Vineet Bafna and Dr.Paul Mischel of the University of California San Diego and Professor Roel Verhaak of Jackson Laboratories. (2020-08-17)

A cancer mystery of more than 40 years ago is solved thanks to epigenetics
In an article that was just published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by the group of Dr. Manel Esteller, Director of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute, ICREA Research Professor and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona is solved this mystery by describing that in cancer cells the protein that generates the nucleotide ''Y'' is epigenetically inactivated, causing small but highly aggressive tumors. (2020-08-12)

Study provides new insight on colorectal cancer growth
A new study by researchers at the University of Kentucky identifies a novel function of the enzyme spermine synthase to facilitate colorectal cancer growth. (2020-07-29)

Scientists ID gene responsible for deadly glioblastoma
The discovery of the oncogene responsible for glioblastoma could be the brain cancer's Achilles' heel, one researcher says. (2020-07-14)

St. Jude researchers create an analytic tool that opens a new frontier of cancer discovery
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed software to identify cancer-causing mutations lurking in vast regions of the human genome. (2020-07-06)

NUS researchers uncover a novel protein which drives cancer progression
Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have discovered a protein that drives the progression of esophageal cancer and liver cancer and it could be a promising target for cancer drug development. (2020-06-29)

Researchers find a new therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer
The development of pancreatic cancer is driven by coexisting mutations in an oncogene involved in controlling cell growth, and in a tumor suppressor gene. But how these mutations cooperate to promote cancer is unknown. A new study uncovers the link between key processes in the formation of pancreatic cancer. (2020-06-18)

New treatment target verification for myelodysplastic syndrome
A Japanese research group analyzed the pathophysiology of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a blood cancer that presents often in the elderly, and found the presence of transcription factor RUNX3, thereby revealing a cancer growth function for what had been considered be a tumor suppressor. Additional analyses of human MDS cells and model mice found an abnormal gene expression mechanism linked to the onset of cancer, and confirmed RUNX3 as a potential therapeutic target. (2020-06-08)

Virtual cell predicts how close tumor environment influences cancer metastasis
IGC Researchers identify signals emitted by the tumor environment, which controls the migrating capacity of cancer cells. The new discovery, now published on CANCER RESEARCH, increases understanding of the complexity of molecules involved in cancer, and opens the possibility of manipulating these signals in the tumor environment to reduce cancer aggressiveness. (2020-03-31)

Experimental drug combination shows potential for triple-negative breast cancer
Researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center discovered a role for MYCN in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a particularly aggressive form of the disease, and identified a potential intervention for further clinical investigation. (2020-03-11)

Towards better anti-cancer drugs
The Bayreuth biochemist Dr. Claus-D. Kuhn and his research team have deciphered how the important human oncogene CDK8 is activated in cells of healthy individuals. Their findings, which have now been published in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.', explain why promising anti-CDK8 drugs are only effective under laboratory conditions but likely not in humans. Gained results also show a new way of developing CDK8-specific drugs in the future. (2020-01-28)

Inhibition of p38 reduces the growth of lung tumours
Ángel Nebreda's team has published a study in the journal PNAS reporting the involvement of the protein p38 in the progression of lung cancer. The work shows that patients with low levels of this protein have a better prognosis. One of the biggest challenges faced by biomedicine is the development of more selective and efficient cancer treatments. (2020-01-23)

UCLA study shows inhibition of gene helps overcome resistance to immunotherapy
A new study helps explain why some people with advanced cancer may not respond to one of the leading immunotherapies, PD-1 blockade, and how a new combination approach may help overcome resistance to the immunotherapy drug. (2019-12-09)

New candidate cancer genes identified using math models
Computational modeling is the use of computers to simulate and study the behavior of complex systems. Computational approaches are widely adopted in the bioimedical sciences and can be used to sift through large volumes of complex data to extract recurrent patterns that may point to a disease's causes and effects. (2019-11-15)

Silencing RNA nanotherapy shows promise against pancreatic cancer
Despite advances in cancer survival, more than 90% of people with pancreatic cancer die within five years. Now a preclinical study by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Fla., has demonstrated that specially designed peptide-based nanoparticles can suppress pancreatic cancer growth without the toxic side effects and therapeutic resistance seen in drug trials. (2019-10-21)

A new route to blocking children's bone cancer
A study in mice showed that reducing a particular hormone signal keeps the cancer from growing and spreading. (2019-10-02)

How newly found tension sensor plays integral role in aligned chromosome partitioning
A Waseda University-led research found that oncogene SET/TAF1, which was found to be a proto-oncogene of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), contributes to proper chromosome partitioning as a tension sensor. Additionally, abnormal SET protein disrupts tension sensor system at the centromere, leading to missegregation of the chromosomes and thereby cancer. These findings may lead to a discovery for a new kind of leukemia treatment. (2019-09-30)

Gene mutation, tissue location, signaling networks drive cancer incidence and severity
Mutated KRAS genes are commonly found in several cancers and not all KRAS mutations in the same organ tissue cause the same disease severity, according to three new studies from researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (2019-09-11)

Discovered a molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of tumors
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute (IJC), discover that a non-coding region of the genome originates a key molecule for the proliferation of tumors in breast cancer and some types of sarcoma. (2019-09-04)

CRISPR gene editing may halt progression of triple-negative breast cancer
A tumor-targeted CRISPR gene editing system, encapsulated in a nanogel and injected into the body, could effectively and safely halt the growth of triple-negative breast cancer, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. Their proof-of-principle study, conducted in human tumor cells and in mice, suggests a potential genetic treatment for triple-negative breast cancer, which has the highest mortality rate of all breast cancers. (2019-08-26)

Genetically manipulating protein level in colon cancer cells can improve chemotherapy
Colorectal cancer outcomes may improve by genetically altering an immune-regulatory protein in cancer cells, making the cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy. That's according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings, published this month in Oncogene, indicate that increasing the expression of the PD-L1 protein in colorectal cancer cells can improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy. (2019-08-26)

Revealing the molecular engine that drives pancreatic cancer provides ways to turn it off
Researchers have decoded a chain of molecules that are critical for the growth and survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma -- the most common and also the most lethal form of pancreatic cancer. (2019-08-22)

Explaining why TP53 is commonly mutated in human cancer, and the effects of its mutation
A comprehensive functional analysis of TP53 mutations in human leukemia may refute a working hypothesis -- primarily based on mouse studies -- that missense mutations confer new cancer-causing functions to the p53 tumor suppressor protein; the new study instead suggests that these mutations exert a 'dominant-negative' effect that reduces the cancer-suppressing activity of wild-type p53, the authors say. (2019-08-08)

New anticancer agents may better control tumor growth in nearly every cancer type
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered a novel set of MYC promoter G-quadruplex stabilizers that have demonstrated anticancer activity in human cancer cell cultures. (2019-07-08)

Protein linked to aggressive skin cancer
Almost 300,000 people worldwide develop malignant melanoma each year. The disease is the most serious form of skin cancer and the number of cases reported annually is increasing, making skin cancer one of Sweden's most common forms of cancer. A research team at Lund University in Sweden has studied a protein that regulates a gene which is linked to metastasis of malignant melanoma. (2019-06-28)

Researchers unlock mysteries of complex microRNA oncogenes
A new collaborative study, led by researchers at McGill University's Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC), and published in the journal Molecular Cell, uncovers novel functions for polycistronic microRNAs and showing how cancers such as lymphoma twist these functions to reorganize the information networks that control gene expression. (2019-06-27)

Newly defined cancer driver is fast, furious and loud
A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center finds that the gene FOXA1 overrides normal biology in three different ways to drive prostate cancer. They refer to the three classes as FAST, FURIOUS, and LOUD to reflect their unique features. (2019-06-26)

Long thought harmless, a glycan biomarker may cause pancreatic disease and cancer
A widely recognized biomarker for pancreatic disease, CA19-9, thought to be benign for decades, may in fact be a promoter for the development of these diseases, including pancreatic cancer. (2019-06-20)

Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. But they can nevertheless influence numerous functions of the cell and thus also disease processes. Scientists from the German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center, and the University of Freiburg have now created a comprehensive database of all synonymous mutations ever found in cancer. This is a 'reference book' that provides cancer researchers with all available information on each of these supposedly 'silent' mutations at a glance. (2019-06-12)

CNIO participates in a study identifying a novel oncogene for most common types of blood cancer
The study shows that tumour suppressor hnRNP K can lead to cancer. Overexpression of the gene may lead to B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of blood cancer. Lymphoma patients might benefit from more personalised treatments. (2019-05-24)

Enzyme PHLPP2 could be a viable drug target for treating prostate cancer
Researchers propose a new druggable target that can put a damper on the spread of prostate cancer. Containing the threat at its origin organ greatly increases the survival rates of patients who suffer from the disease. (2019-05-15)

New study explains how inflammation causes gastric cancer
Researchers from Kanazawa University and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. Using mouse models and human cancer cell lines, they showed that inflammation resulting from bacterial infection leads to the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, which ultimately form gastric tumors. By blocking the protein pathway responsible for this proliferation, they prevented gastric tumor formation. (2019-04-16)

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