Current Online Courses News and Events

Current Online Courses News and Events, Online Courses News Articles.
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Combining PD-1inhibitor with VEGF inhibitor in chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma patient
Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most frequent liver cancer. Many patients miss the opportunity of having a surgery performed on them and its control has always been considered difficult. Here, doctors from The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou, China, present a case of stage 4 cholangiocarcinoma. (2021-02-02)

Dramatic changes to radiotherapy treatments due to COVID-19
Dramatic changes were seen in the delivery of radiotherapy treatments for cancer during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic in England. Much shorter radiotherapy courses were delivered, treatments were delayed where it was safe to do so and some increases were seen in order to compensate for reduced surgical capacity. Experts believe the changes reflect an impressive adaption of services by the NHS, and that the overall impact on cancer outcomes is likely to be modest. (2021-01-22)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Online courses reinforce inequalities
With the global student community taking online courses, a study (UNIGE) reveals that online courses deepen inequalities between gifted and less gifted students by 5%. The results of the study, which was based on data collected in 2016-2017 prior to the anti-Covid lockdown initiatives. They indicate that this learning gap between different student profiles is mainly due to their behaviour and motivation. (2021-01-19)

College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a Dartmouth study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language. The findings are published in Gender & Society. (2021-01-18)

Instead of pushing students entrepreneurship, they should be helped to make a better decision
According to an international study by two researchers at Pompeu Fabra University and at Abu Dhabi University, entrepreneurship education today does not help students understand what motivates them. Furthermore, the fact that students have motivational self-knowledge and clear priorities does help them to make decisions in favour of or against entrepreneurship. (2021-01-11)

Mindfulness can improve mental health and wellbeing -- but unlikely to work for everyone
Mindfulness courses can reduce anxiety, depression and stress and increase mental wellbeing within most but not all non-clinical settings, say a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. They also found that mindfulness may be no better than other practices aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing. (2021-01-11)

Old silicon learns new tricks
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology fabricated regular arrays of iron-coated silicon crystals that are atomically smooth. The defect-free pyramidal composition of the crystals impart magnetic properties that will enhance the functionality of 3D spintronics and other technologies. (2021-01-06)

Fire-resistant tropical forest on brink of disappearance -
A new study reveals the extreme scale of loss and fragmentation of tropical forests, which once covered much of the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Kalimantan. The study, led by Swansea University, also reveals that only 10% of the forest that is left remains fire-resistant. The researchers warn that protecting this is crucial for preventing catastrophic fire. (2020-12-18)

Much of the world may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until 2022
Nearly a quarter of the world's population may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until at least 2022, warns a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-15)

PTSD with depression may significantly increase risk of early death in women
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression have an almost fourfold greater risk of early death than women without trauma exposure or depression. The findings are particularly relevant during the current pandemic, which is exposing many women to unusually high levels of stress. (2020-12-04)

New study outlines steps higher education should take to prepare a new quantum workforce
A new study outlines ways colleges and universities can update their curricula to prepare the workforce for a new wave of quantum technology jobs. Three researchers, including Rochester Institute of Technology Associate Professor Ben Zwickl, suggested steps that need to be taken in a new paper in Physical Review Physics Education Research after interviewing managers at more than 20 quantum technology companies across the U.S. (2020-11-12)

The use of videos in education could improve student pass rates
The results indicate that the videos may help to increase the chances of passing a course. (2020-11-09)

Intensive lab experiences and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
For students studying ecology and evolution, it's important to experience the processes and concepts they are learning about nature in nature. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, field-based courses rapidly transitioned to online only delivery. An article published in Ecology and Evolution discusses the potential advantages of pairing an intensive lab experience with an otherwise online delivery. (2020-11-04)

Five key factors for improving team learning in distance education
Distance studying and working is on the rise and, especially now with the constant threat of lockdown, learning how to master it more pressing than ever. A team of researchers from the Research Group in Education and ICT (EDUL@B) at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC), led by Montse Guitert, has conducted a study to improve collaborative learning online and has redesigned an online course that overcomes the principal challenges. (2020-10-21)

Steroid inhalers/pills for asthma linked to heightened risk of brittle bones and fractures
Taking steroid inhalers or tablets to treat asthma or control flare-ups is linked to a heightened risk of brittle bones (osteoporosis) and increased vulnerability to broken bones (fragility fractures), finds research published online in the journal Thorax. (2020-10-20)

Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA's Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success. (2020-10-12)

A social-belonging intervention improves STEM outcomes for ESL students
A study conducted at 19 universities by IU researchers and their colleagues in the US and Canada, found that a brief social belonging exercise, administered online before students arrive on campus, boosts the performance and persistence of students in STEM disciplines - science, technology, engineering and math - who speak English as a second language. (2020-10-02)

Lockdown mental health problems amongst family carers up to 10 times higher
Family carers for children and adults with intellectual disabilities have reported rates of mental health problems under lockdown that are up to 10 times higher than parents without those responsibilities, a new study has found. They were five times more likely to report severe anxiety, and between four and ten times more likely to report major depression, compared to parents who did not have caring responsibilities for children with intellectual disability. (2020-09-24)

Neurotic college students could benefit from health education
College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more positive stress mindset, according to research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-09-23)

Preparing future clinicians to intervene in opioid crisis
Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels around the world. In the United States, remediation of pain is one of the most common reasons American adults seek healthcare. Therefore, it is vital that clinicians practicing in diverse roles and settings have a clinical understanding of pain and substance use disorders as well as knowledge about public health and opioid policy interventions. (2020-09-17)

Asthma patients given risky levels of steroid tablets
More than one quarter of asthma patients have been prescribed potentially dangerous amounts of steroid tablets, with researchers warning this puts them at greater risk of serious side-effects. (2020-09-13)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

COVID-19: Immune system derails
Contrary to what has been generally assumed so far, a severe course of COVID-19 does not solely result in a strong immune reaction - rather, the immune response is caught in a continuous loop of activation and inhibition. Experts from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), along with colleagues from a nationwide research network, present these findings in Cell. (2020-08-06)

New printing process advances 3D capabilities
More durable prosthetics and medical devices for patients and stronger parts for airplanes and automobiles are just some of the products that could be created through a new 3D printing technology invented by a UMass Lowell researcher. (2020-07-31)

STEM not for women?
A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova, research fellows of the HSE University, examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates. According to the study, more than one in three (35%) young women have been led to believe in men's superior mathematical ability. (2020-07-21)

Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads
Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level. But is representation enough to improve gender diversity in science? In a new study, Colorado State University researchers say there's more to the story: They've found that even when undergraduate women outnumber men in science courses, women may still be experiencing gender biases from their peers. (2020-06-29)

Randomization of provisional vs two-stent techniques in complex bifurcation lesions
Aim: The present study aimed to assess the benefits of two-stent techniques for patients with DEFINITION criteria-defined complex coronary bifurcation lesions. Methods and Results: In total, 653 patients with complex bifurcation lesions at 49 international centres were randomly assigned to undergo the systematic two-stent technique (two-stent group) or provisional stenting (provisional group). The primary endpoint was the composite of target lesion failure... (2020-06-25)

DynamX Bioadaptor, a novel 'uncaging' platform for coronary artery revascularisation
Drug Eluting Stents (DES) are the mainstay of coronary artery disease treatment. Although DES design iterations have reduced MACE in the first year after PCI, beyond 1-year, a persistent 2-3% annualized event rate without plateau is observed. The DynamX™ Novolimus-Eluting Coronary Bioadaptor System is a 71 micron thin, cobalt-chromium platform with a novel ''uncaging'' mechanism of the circumferential rings after 6 months while maintaining axial links following uncaging. (2020-06-25)

External ultrasound therapy of calcific aortic stenosis -- First-in-man
Cardiawave (France) has developed a Non-Invasive Ultrasound Therapy (NIUT) for the treatment of cardio-valvular diseases such as aortic stenosis. This is the primary valve disease in adults and one of the leading causes of cardiovascular death worldwide which affects 10 million people in Europe and the USA. (2020-06-25)

Routine revascularization vs. medical therapy: Meta-analysis and review
Revascularization is often performed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). However, whether revascularization reduces death and other cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. Cumulative evidence from this meta-analysis of randomized trials, including the recently published ISCHEMIA... (2020-06-25)

Comprehensive evaluation of mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring
Mitral valve-in-valve (ViV) and valve-in-ring (ViR) are alternatives to surgical reoperation in patients with recurrent mitral valve failure after previous surgical valve repair or replacement. Our aim was to perform a large-scale analysis examining mid-term outcomes after mitral ViV and ViR. (2020-06-25)

Two-year outcomes after revascularisation deferral based on FFR or iFR measurements
Revascularisation deferral (i.e. decision to treat medically) is a key aspect of physiology-based coronary revascularisation. In the post-ISCHEMIA trial scenario, it is key to understand whether decision-making with hyperaemic- and non-hyperaemic indices lead to similar rates of revascularization, and if this happens over the shifting age range of coronary patients... (2020-06-25)

PCR State-of-the-art lecture on 'The resurgence of renal denervation'
Renal denervation (RDN) represents a device-based hypertension treatment intended to lower sympathetic activity. Only a few years ago, RDN was written off as ineffective after results of the sham-controlled SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial failed to confirm early trials' reports of significant BP reductions in patients resistant to guideline- based combination drug therapy. (2020-06-25)

The burden of non-COVID patients: Caring for the left-behind
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has exposed gaps in health care systems. Recognition of the impacts of these gaps offers an opportunity for health care professionals working with political institutions to improve the intersection between health and society. Health care systems will need to simultaneously deal with non-COVID-19 chronic conditions (''the people left behind'') as well as maintain hospital facilities at a high level of preparedness for urgent care pandemic patients. (2020-06-25)

Effect of ultrasound renal denervation after crossover from sham in RADIANCE-HTN SOLO
Control of hypertension represents an unmet need globally, and RDN is an 'adherence-independent' adjunctive therapy to medications. The RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that demonstrated the blood pressure lowering effect of endovascular ultrasound-based renal denervation compared with a sham control. (2020-06-25)

Merits of revascularisation and medical treatment for chronic coronary syndromes
There are two treatment goals for patients with chronic coronary syndromes: reducing the risk of hard outcomes (i.e., death, myocardial infarction) and improving health outcomes (i.e. angina symptoms, quality of life). Several drugs address these objectives, but what about invasive interventions such as coronary angiography and revascularization? (2020-06-25)

Illinois professor proposes guide for developing common data science approaches
University of Illinois information sciences professor Victoria Stodden proposes a way to develop recognized data science processes for research. (2020-06-25)

Oral antibiotics work, shorten hospital stays for IV drug users with infections
A combination of IV and oral antibiotics can effectively treat invasive infections in people who inject illicit drugs, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings mean that patients who do not wish to stay in the hospital for weeks of IV antibiotic treatment can leave and complete taking their prescribed antibiotics at home. (2020-06-16)

Minority students can become 'hyperpersistent' when they achieve better than middling grades
Scientists report that undergraduate students from underrepresented groups who score below a C- in general chemistry are less likely to persist in STEM classes than their classmates with similar grades, but they are much more likely than their peers to persist if they earn a C+ or better. The researchers suggest that improving the performance of all students could (2020-06-10)

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