Current Online Dating News and Events

Current Online Dating News and Events, Online Dating News Articles.
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New dating techniques reveal Australia's oldest known rock painting, and it's a kangaroo
Researchers successfully date Australia's oldest intact rock painting, using pioneering radiocarbon technique. (2021-02-22)

42,000-year-old trees allow more accurate analysis of last Earth's magnetic field reversal
The last complete reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, the so-called Laschamps event, took place 42,000 years ago. Radiocarbon analyses of the remains of kauri trees from New Zealand now make it possible for the first time to precisely time and analyse this event and its associated effects, as well as to calibrate geological archives such as sediment and ice cores from this period. Simulations based on this show considerable effects in the Earth's atmosphere. (2021-02-19)

First humans in Tasmania must have seen spectacular auroras
A small sub-alpine lake in western Tasmania has helped establish that 41,000 years ago Australia experienced the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion and that Tasmanian, Aboriginals, would've seen it. (2021-02-15)

Palaeontology: Fossil burrows point to ancient seafloor colonization by giant marine worms
Giant ambush-predator worms, possible ancestors of the 'bobbit worm', may have colonized the seafloor of the Eurasian continent around 20 million years ago. The findings, based on the reconstruction of large, L-shaped burrows from layers of seafloor dating back to the Miocene (23 million to 5.3 million years ago) of northeast Taiwan, are reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2021-01-21)

A massive advance in spectrometry
Kanazawa University scientists use computer simulations of charged molecules to help improve the accuracy of mass spectrometers. By understanding the collisions between ions that reduce excess charges, this work may lead to more sensitive radiocarbon dating and medical testing. (2021-01-18)

Dating apps don't destroy love
A study by UNIGE provides a wealth of information about couples who met through dating apps. The results indicate that app-formed couples have stronger cohabitation intentions than couples who meet in a non-digital environment. What is more, women who found their partner through a dating app have stronger desires and intentions to have children. The study shows that these apps play an important role in modifying the composition of couples by allowing for more educationally. (2020-12-30)

Geology: Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-17)

Kernels of history
Earlier this year Douglas J. Kennett, a UC Santa Barbara professor of anthropology, demonstrated that maize, or corn, became a staple crop in the Americas 4,700 years ago. It turns out he was just beginning to tell the story of the world's biggest grain crop. (2020-12-15)

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence. (2020-12-03)

Middle Stone Age populations repeatedly occupied West African coast
In a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports, researchers from the Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH), and the University of Sheffield, reveal evidence of Middle Stone Age occupations of the West African coast. Ranging from 62 to 25 thousand years ago, the largest well-dated assemblages from the region clearly document technological continuity across almost 40,000 years in West Africa. (2020-11-20)

Teton range glacial ice may have persisted in a dormant state during early Holocene warming
A continuous 10,000-year record of alpine glacier fluctuations in Wyoming's Teton Range suggests that some glacial ice in the western US persisted in a reduced, essentially dormant state during periods of early Holocene warming. The findings challenge the paradigm that all Rocky Mountain glaciers completely disappeared during these warm, dry conditions, instead. (2020-11-18)

'Extremely aggressive' internet censorship spreads in the world's democracies
The largest collection of public internet censorship data ever compiled shows that even citizens of what are considered the world's freest countries aren't safe from internet censorship. (2020-11-17)

SwRI scientists expand space instrument's capabilities
A new study by Southwest Research Institute scientists describes how they have ex-panded the capabilities of the prototype spaceflight instrument Chemistry Organic and Dating Experiment (CODEX), designed for field-based dating of extraterrestrial materi-als. CODEX now uses two different dating approaches based on rubidium-strontium and lead-lead geochronology methods. The instrument uses laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometry (LARIMS) to obtain dates using these methods. (2020-11-16)

Rise of the relationship herbivore -- Japanese increasingly single, disinterested in dates
In 2015 in Japan, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 3 men in their 30s were single, and half of the singles say they are not interested in heterosexual relationships. Public health experts at the University of Tokyo found that those who are disinterested in relationships are more likely to have lower incomes and less education than their romantically minded peers, potentially pointing towards socioeconomic factors behind the stagnation of the Japanese dating market. (2020-11-09)

Depression, social anxiety, and use of mobile dating apps
Depression symptoms and social anxiety are associated with greater use of mobile dating applications among women (2020-11-02)

Denisovan DNA found in sediments of Baishiya Karst Cave on Tibetan Plateau
A joint research team from China, Germany and Australia has now reported their findings of Denisovan DNA from sediments of the Baishiya Karst Cave (BKC) on the Tibetan Plateau where the Xiahe mandible was found. (2020-10-30)

Study finds 5 distinct dog types from 11,000 years ago
An international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor has studied the lineage of dogs and found that there were at least five different types of dogs as far back as 11,000 years ago. (2020-10-29)

Marriage or not? Rituals help dating couples decide relationship future
Rituals such as those centered around holidays and other celebrations play an important part in human relationships. When dating couples engage in rituals together, they learn more about each other. And those experiences can serve as diagnostic tools of where the relationship is going, a University of Illinois study shows. (2020-10-15)

210Pb dating of marine sedimentary cores
Fourteen laboratories participated in this interlaboratory comparison exercise (ILC). The results indicated good analytical performance by the participating laboratories, but the results of the 210Pb dating did not reach the desired level of satisfaction. (2020-10-05)

Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE. Instead, they may have been introduced to the peninsula -- which makes up most of modern-day Turkey -- and the nearby Caucasus region from the Eurasian Steppe by about 2000 BCE, during the Bronze Age. (2020-09-16)

Knowledge about the past can preserve the biodiversity of tomorrow
Climate change threatens plants and animals across the planet. Interdisciplinary research by, among others, climate and biodiversity researchers at the University of Copenhagen, has mapped responds of biodiversity caused by abrupt climate changes in the past. The findings can be used to protect both individual species and entire ecosystems in the warmer climates of the future and can strengthen effective conservation practice and policy. (2020-08-28)

Proven: Historical climate changes occurred simultaneously in several parts of the world
A new study published by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and partner institutions has proven that repeated and abrupt climate changes during the last ice age occurred simultaneously in South America, Southeast Asia, Europe and Greenland. Abrupt climate change can be as problematic as gradual change and we should deal with the risks associated with abrupt scenarios, suggests a UCPH researcher. (2020-08-26)

Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old. (2020-08-13)

Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard
Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects. (2020-08-12)

Native American stone tool technology found in Arabia
Stone fluted points dating back some 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, were discovered on archaeological sites in Manayzah, Yemen and Ad-Dahariz, Oman. Until now, the prehistoric technique of fluting had been uncovered only on 13,000 to 10,000-year-old Native American sites. (2020-08-05)

Lead released in Notre Dame Cathedral fire detected in Parisian honey
Elevated levels of lead have been found in samples of honey from hives downwind of the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, collected three months after the April 2019 blaze. (2020-07-29)

Link between education, income inequality has existed for a century
Income is inextricably linked to access to education in America and it has been for a century, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University and Rice University. (2020-07-27)

Neanderthals of Western Mediterranean did not become extinct because of changes in climate
According to paleoclimatic reconstructions analysing stalagmites sampled in some caves in the Murge plateau (Apulia, Italy), Neanderthals might have become extinct because Sapiens employed more sophisticated hunting technologies (2020-07-20)

Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates
Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change. (2020-07-20)

Rewriting history: New evidence challenges Euro-centric narrative of early colonization
ew research from Washington University in St. Louis provides evidence that Indigenous people continued to live in southeastern US and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Spanish explorers in the 1500s. (2020-07-15)

29,000 years of Aboriginal history
The known timeline of the Aboriginal occupation of South Australia's Riverland region has been vastly extended by new research led by Flinders University in collaboration with the River Murray and Mallee Aboriginal Corporation (RMMAC). Radiocarbon dating of shell middens - remnants of meals eaten long ago - capture a record of Aboriginal occupation that extends to around 29,000 years, confirming the location as one of the oldest sites along the 2500km river to become the oldest River Murray Indigenous site in South Australia. (2020-07-14)

Do we know what we want in a romantic partner? No more than a random stranger would
New research coming out of the University of California, Davis, suggests that people's ideal partner preferences do not reflect any unique personal insight (2020-07-06)

SwRI scientists demonstrate speed, precision of in situ planetary dating device
Southwest Research Institute scientists have increased the speed and accuracy of a laboratory-scale instrument for determining the age of planetary specimens onsite. The team is progressively miniaturizing the Chemistry, Organics and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument to reach a size suitable for spaceflight and lander missions. (2020-06-29)

BU study: Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner. (2020-06-29)

UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic
Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water. Now University of Montana researcher Michael DeGrandpre and his patented sensors have helped an international team determine that, indeed, CO2 levels are rising in water across wide swaths of the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin. (2020-06-24)

Measles origin finding could inform COVID-19 research
Virus genome sequencing study and comment published in Science. University of Sydney and University of Melbourne evolutionary scientists provide commentary on important new study. (2020-06-18)

Using a Gaussian mathematical model to define eruptive stages of young volcanic rocks
Precise dating of young samples since the Quaternary has been a difficult problem in the study of volcanoes and surface environment. In a recent study, Gaussian mathematical model was introduced to define the eruption stages of the Tengchong Volcanic rocks. (2020-06-17)

Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals
A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia. The findings suggest this coast offered the resources necessary to act as a gateway out of Africa during periods of little rainfall when other food sources were scarce. (2020-06-16)

Radiocarbon dating pins date for construction of Uyghur complex to the year 777
Dating archaeological objects precisely is difficult, even when using techniques such as radiocarbon dating. Using a recently developed method, based on the presence of sudden spikes in carbon-14 concentration, scientists at the University of Groningen, together with Russian colleagues, have pinned the date for the construction of an eighth-century complex in southern Siberia to a specific year. This allows archaeologists to finally understand the purpose for building the complex -- and why it was never used. (2020-06-08)

NASA infrared imagery indicates cristobal's heavy rainmaking capabilities
One of the ways NASA observes tropical cyclones is by using infrared data that provides temperature information and indicates storm strength. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathered that data and revealed Cristobal has the potential to generate heavy rainfall. That rainfall is now soaking Mexico and portions of Central America as Cristobal meanders. (2020-06-04)

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