Current Oocytes News and Events

Current Oocytes News and Events, Oocytes News Articles.
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Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

3D printing resins in dental devices may be toxic to reproductive health
Two commercially available 3D-printable resins, which are marketed as being biocompatible for use in dental applications, readily leach compounds into their surroundings. These compounds can induce severe toxicity in the oocyte, the immature precursor of the egg which can eventually be fertilized, reports a new study in mouse oocytes. (2021-01-28)

Study helps understand why kids of obese mothers may be susceptible to metabolic diseases
The phenomenon may be associated with a deficiency of the protein mitofusin-2 in the mother's eggs, which affects the shape and functioning of mitochondria. The finding was based on experiments with mice conducted at the Federal University of São Carlos and reported in the journal Molecular Human Reproduction. (2021-01-26)

Scientists produce the first in-vitro embryos from vitrified African lion oocytes
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany, Givskud Zoo - Zootopia in Denmark and the University of Milan in Italy succeeded in producing the very first African lion in-vitro embryos after the vitrification of immature oocytes. (2021-01-18)

Oh so simple: Eight genes enough to convert mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells
By activating just eight genes for transcription factors, researchers at Kyushu University have directly converted mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells that mature and can even be fertilized like egg cells. In addition to giving new insight into egg cell development, the research may lead to a simple route for generating large amounts of oocyte cytoplasm for use in reproductive biology and medicine. (2020-12-16)

Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a study appearing December 10 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the frequency of exchangeless chromosomes is not affected by maternal age. (2020-12-10)

Molecule that regulates muscle adaptation to exercise is discovered
An article in Cell shows that the metabolite succinate is released by muscle cells during physical exercise and triggers a process of tissue remodeling that makes muscles stronger and enhances metabolic efficiency. (2020-12-01)

Single-cell technique could provide 'egg health' indicators
Using the power of single-cell analysis, researchers at the Babraham Institute have assessed the effects of age on egg cells (oocytes) in mice, particularly looking to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that relate to reduced developmental competence. The knowledge uncovered by this research provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying egg quality and is relevant to the development of techniques to assess the quality of human egg cells, an area of growing importance as the use of fertility treatments increases. (2020-11-18)

Mothers ensure their offspring's success through epigenetics
Parents pass genes along to their offspring which equip them for their future life. In recent years, research has shown that the reality is much more complex and that parents endow much more than just genes. A new study in Cell by the laboratory of Asifa Akhtar at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics reveals that active epigenetic modifications are also passed from one generation to the next. (2020-06-04)

Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction. For almost 15 years, it has been commonly held that retinoic acid, a molecule derived from vitamin A, triggers meiosis in mammalian germ cells. Yet, in joint articles published in Science Advances, french researchers with their colleagues, demonstrate that meiosis in mice begins and proceeds normally even in the absence of retinoic acid. These findings set the stage for new research in the field of reproductive biology. (2020-05-22)

Preserving fertility in female cancer patients and ageing populations
A Monash University study has uncovered the role DNA repair plays in preserving egg quality, offering hope for women whose eggs may be damaged through treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. (2020-05-21)

The ova of obese women have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids
A study conducted by researchers from the UPV/EHU, Cruces Hospital, the IVI Clinic Bilbao and Biocruces Bizkaia shows that the oocytes of obese or overweight women have a different composition of fatty acids. This difference in levels could be linked to poor IVF outcomes and could suggest that the offspring of overweight women have an unfavourable environment even before conception. (2020-04-30)

Novel sperm membrane protein FIMP facilitates mammalian fertilization
Researchers from Osaka University have identified a new sperm membrane protein that facilitates the complex sperm-oocyte fusion that is fundamental to sexual reproduction, naming it Fertilization Influencing Membrane Protein (FIMP). Using genome editing technology to generate knockout mice deficient in specific genes, they confirmed its importance in addition to the three factors already known. This knowledge may help in the management of human infertility and advance the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives. (2020-04-16)

Study suggests marijuana may impair female fertility
Female eggs exposed to THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, have an impaired ability to produce viable embryos, and are significantly less likely to result in a viable pregnancy, according to an animal study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. The abstract will be published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-04-02)

Jellyfish help understand the timing of egg production
In animals, releasing eggs in a timely manner is vital to maximize the chances of successful fertilization. However, how this process evolved and is controlled in different species is poorly understood. A new regulator of egg release has been identified in jellyfish in a new study published March 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Gonzalo Quiroga Artigas and Evelyn Houliston of Sorbonne University, France, and colleagues. The finding sheds light on how the complex hormonal control of sexual reproduction in animals evolved. (2020-03-03)

First baby born to cancer patient from eggs matured in the lab and frozen
Fertility doctors in France have announced the birth of the first baby to be born to a cancer patient from an immature egg that was matured in the laboratory, frozen, then thawed and fertilized five years later. The report is published in Annals of Oncology. (2020-02-18)

The first roadmap for ovarian aging
Infertility likely stems from age-related decline of the ovaries, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to this decline have been unclear. Now, scientists from the US and China have discovered, in unprecedented detail, how ovaries age in non-human primates. The findings reveal several genes that could be used as biomarkers and point to therapeutic targets for diagnosing and treating female infertility and age-associated ovarian diseases, such as ovarian cancer, in humans. (2020-01-30)

Newly created embryo nourishes hope for the survival of the northern white rhino
In December 2019 the team of scientists and conservationists repeated the egg collection from the northern white rhinos in Kenya and was able to create a new embryo over Christmas. (2020-01-15)

Mouse pups born from eggs derived from the granulosa cells that surround oocytes
By introducing a chemical cocktail to granulosa cells, researchers in China induced the cells to transform into functional oocytes in mice. Once fertilized, these oocytes were then successfully able to produce healthy offspring, showing no differences from naturally bred mice. The chemical reprogramming method appears Dec. 24, 2019, in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-12-24)

These albino lizards are the world's first gene-edited reptiles
Meet the world's first gene-edited reptiles: albino lizards roughly the size of your index finger. Researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to make the lizards, providing a technique for gene editing outside of major animal models. In their study, publishing Aug. 27 in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers also show that the lizards can successfully pass gene-edited alleles for albinism to their offspring. (2019-08-27)

Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized
After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. This was achieved through ICSI (Intra Cytoplasm Sperm Injection) with frozen sperm from two different northern white rhino bulls, Suni and Saut, on Sunday, August 25th. (2019-08-26)

Identification of all types of germ cells tumors
Germ cell tumors were considered very heterogeneous and diverse, until recently. Researchers from the Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and the Princess Máxima Center for pediatric oncology have added structure by suggesting a subdivision in seven types of germ cell tumors. This division is relevant for basic and clinical research and contributes to optimal diagnostics and healthcare in the future. (2019-08-26)

Successful egg harvest breaks new ground in saving the northern white rhinoceros
There are only two northern white rhinos left worldwide, both of them female. Saving this representative of megafauna from extinction seems impossible under these circumstances, yet an international consortium of scientists and conservationists just completed a procedure that could enable assisted reproduction techniques to do just that. On August 22, 2019, a team of veterinarians successfully harvested eggs from the two females who live in Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. (2019-08-23)

Unravelling the 3-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells
A study led by the UAB and the CNAG-CRG reveals the three-dimensional genomic structure of male germ cells and how this structure determines their function. Published in Cell Reports, it represents a significant advance in our understanding of how the dynamics of insulator proteins and transcriptional activity are coupled during the 3D genome re-organisation that takes place during the formation of male germ cells. (2019-07-10)

ICSI has no outcome benefits over conventional IVF in routine non-male infertility cases
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the world's favored means of fertilization in assisted reproduction, offers no benefit over conventional in vitro fertilization in fertility treatments without a male factor indication, according to results of a large multicenter study. (2019-06-26)

Kyushu U researchers unlocking keys to longevity of egg cell supply in mammals
Researchers at Kyushu University have shown that reduced oxygen and mechanical compression are two environmental factors playing a role in creating and maintaining a supply of dormant egg cells in mice to ensure a long period of fertility. These insights into this critical but poorly understood process will further the understanding and development of reproductive biology and medicine. (2019-06-26)

Russian scientists found out how a male-hating bacterium rejuvenates
A team from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University together with their Russian colleagues carried out genetic analysis of the symbiotic bacterium Wolbachia that prevents the birth and development of males in different species of arthropods. It turned out that the microorganisms exchanged their genes to rejuvenate. (2019-04-01)

Ovary function is preserved in transgender men at one year of testosterone therapy
Transgender men preserve their fertility potential even after one year of treatment with the male hormone testosterone, according to a study that will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-23)

The algae's third eye
Scientists at the Universities of Würzburg and Bielefeld in Germany have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae. The sensor triggers a reaction that is similar to one in the human eye. (2019-01-11)

Mechanism safeguarding unique epigenome of oocytes and maternal fertility
Recently, a joint research group led by Dr. ZHU Bing from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reveals that Stella sequestered UHRF1 from the nucleus through an active nuclear export process, and the dysregulation of UHRF1 by loss of Stella resulted in an accumulation of aberrant DNA methylation during postnatal oogenesis. (2018-11-28)

Scientists identify new genetic causes linked to abnormal pregnancies and miscarriages
A team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University have identified three genes responsible for recurrent molar pregnancies, a rare complication that occurs when a non-viable pregnancy with no embryo implants in the uterus. The results of this study, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, could have important implications, since until now very little is known about the genetic causes of all forms of fetal loss. (2018-11-20)

Removal of ovary for fertility preservation found safe in girls as young as 5 months
In the first publication from the U.S. on surgical techniques and outcomes of single ovary removal for fertility preservation in girls, surgeons from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago report that the procedure caused no complications and can be performed laparoscopically, on an outpatient basis, without delaying treatment for cancer or other therapies posing high risk of infertility. (2018-10-01)

'Cellular memory' of DNA damage in oocyte quality control
Females are born with a finite number of eggs that come from a much larger pool of millions of precursor cells. New research from UC Davis shows how cells that have experienced DNA damage are removed from this pool, so only the highest quality oocytes can become eggs. (2018-09-27)

Obesity, infertility and oxidative stress in mouse egg cells
Proteomic analysis of oocytes from obese mice showed changes in a protein that promotes antioxidant production and may alter meiotic spindles. (2018-08-16)

Why does making new egg cells require so much cell death?
A highly detailed study of how the roundworm C. elegans forms oocytes suggests that the egg-making process leads to the formation and subsequent destruction of cells with an extra nucleus, but that some cellular materials are recycled into new eggs. James Priess of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and colleagues, report these findings in a new study published July 19th, 2018 in PLOS Genetics. (2018-07-19)

A breakthrough to rescue the Northern White Rhino
Northern White Rhinos (NWR) are functionally extinct, as only two females of this species are left on the planet. An international team of scientists has now successfully created hybrid embryos from Southern White Rhino (SWR) eggs and NWR sperm using assisted reproduction techniques (ART). This is the first, ever reported, generation of blastocysts (a pre-implantation embryos) of rhinos in a test tube. (2018-07-04)

What's in an egg? Oocyte factors that can reprogram adult cells
The promise of generating truly pluripotent stem cells from terminally differentiated adult cell types continues to captivate scientists who envision great potential for therapeutic interventions. (2018-07-03)

Only 7 percent of social egg freezers have returned for fertility treatment at a large European center
Despite dramatic uptake in the numbers of women electing to freeze their eggs as insurance against an anticipated age-related fertility decline, there is still little that clinics can predict about outcome based on real-life experience. Indeed, at one of Europe's biggest fertility centers -- the Brussels Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Belgium -- only 7.6 percent of women have returned to thaw their eggs and try for a pregnancy. And only one-third of those have been successful. (2018-07-03)

Mystery solved: The bacterial protein that kills male fruit flies
An endosymbiotic bacterium, Spiroplasma, specifically kills the males of its fruit-fly host (Drosophila). This has perplexed biologists since the 1950's, but EPFL scientists have now solved the mystery by identifying the gene behind this gender-specific killing. (2018-05-03)

New testing provides better information for parents of children with form of epilepsy
New ways of sequencing the human genome mean geneticists and genetic counselors have much more to say to parents who wonder if future children might carry the disease, (2018-04-25)

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