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Current Oral Contraceptives News and Events, Oral Contraceptives News Articles.
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Tumor progression depends on the tumor microenvironment
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor progression in response to TGF-β protein secreted from CAFs. The findings of this study could help develop novel cancer therapies. (2020-10-01)

Pathogens in the mouth induce oral cancer
Pathogens found in tissues that surround the teeth contribute to a highly aggressive type of oral cancer, according to a study published 1st October in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Yvonne Kapila of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. In addition, the study showed that oral cancer formation mediated by the pathogens is inhibited by a bacteriocin - an antimicrobial and probiotic peptide that is produced by bacteria. (2020-10-01)

Landmark clinical trial shows effectiveness of oral antibiotics in treating cystic fibrosis condition
A major national study led by experts from Bristol and Nottingham has found that oral antibiotics are just as effective as intravenous antibiotics in killing a common germ that causes dangerous complications in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. (2020-09-29)

Tests indicate modern oral nicotine products elicit lower toxicity responses than cigs
New research by BAT indicates that Modern Oral Products (MOPs) showed lower toxicity responses in certain assays than traditional cigarettes. (2020-09-28)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

Higher dementia risk in women with prolonged fertility
Women with a longer reproductive period had an elevated risk for dementia in old age, compared with those who were fertile for a shorter period, a population-based study from the University of Gothenburg shows. (2020-09-17)

Oral radiography can reveal chronic coronary artery disease
A study found a link between carotid artery calcification observable in radiographs and coronary artery disease as well as several oral infections. (2020-09-16)

Researchers ask: how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product - the toothbrush - to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health. (2020-09-16)

Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used. (2020-09-14)

Paying GPs to provide contraception information linked to reduced abortions
Providing general practitioners (GPs) with financial incentives to offer information about long-acting contraceptives, such as the hormonal implant, is associated with an increase in their use, and a fall in the number of abortions . (2020-09-14)

Cool eyes on fever screening: Optimizing infrared thermography
A report published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics provides insights for optimizing infrared thermograph-based fever screening. Thermography using infrared thermographs (IRTs), enables increased options for temperature estimation with greater accuracy. Although the use of thermography as a stand-alone detection method for COVID-19 is unlikely to prevent spread, emerging evidence and international consensus suggest that it is indeed possible to use IRTs effectively for detecting elevated body temperatures. (2020-09-14)

ENT physicians and researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Virtual Annual Meeting
During the AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, which runs from September 13 through October 25, the most current research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be introduced during the Scientific Oral Presentations. Scientific Oral Presentations are a series of three- to six-minute presentations focusing on current evidence-based research, surgical procedures, and approaches in clinical sciences and their application to patient care. (2020-09-09)

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries. (2020-09-08)

NAMS releases the 2020 Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause Position Statement
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) announces publication of its 2020 Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause (GSM) Position Statement. The new recommendations reflect the healthcare community's most recent and proven safe and effective therapies for treating women with GSM, including intravaginal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oral ospemifene, and a low-dose estradiol vaginal insert. The position statement is available online and will be published in the September issue of Menopause, the journal of NAMS. (2020-09-01)

Educational mailing fails to improve medication use in patients with atrial fibrillation
Prevention drugs, according to results of the IMPACT-AFib trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. Patients with atrial fibrillation are at increased risk of stroke. Studies have shown that most of these strokes can be prevented with oral anticoagulation. However, oral anticoagulant medication is underused by patients with atrial fibrillation. (2020-09-01)

Study reveals best anti-clotting strategy after heart valve intervention
The POPular TAVI trial has challenged current guideline recommendations on antiplatelet treatment after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients not taking oral anticoagulation. The findings are presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-31)

What is cerebral venous thrombosis? study finds blood clot condition on the rise
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) occurs when a blood clot forms in one of the veins in the brain, preventing blood from draining out of the brain. A new analysis has found that the incidence of CVT in the United States is higher than previously reported and has increased over time. The study is published in the August 26, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-08-26)

Scientists sink teeth into identifying several new bacteria that cause dental caries
The microbial ecosystem of our body plays a vital role in its upkeep. Any imbalance in this ecosystem can cause several health problems; in our mouth, this can mean tooth cavities. Motivated by the need to find out why an increasing number of young Japanese people are reporting tooth decay, scientists from Japan examined saliva samples from university students. They discovered insightful differences in the oral microbial communities of those with and without tooth decay. (2020-08-21)

Stomach SIDT1 mediates dietary microRNA absorption: ending of the 10-year debate
In a new study published in Cell Research, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University School of Life Sciences, China, reports that SIDT1 in the mammalian stomach mediates host uptake of dietary and orally administered microRNAs (miRNAs), thus exerting biological functions in the host. (2020-08-17)

New generation of drugs show early efficacy against drug-resistant TB
New drug regimen for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis shows early effectiveness in 85 percent of patients in a cohort including many with serious comorbidities. The results suggest a global need for expanded access to two recently developed medicines, bedaquiline and delamanid. Study cohort included many people who would have been excluded from trials because of comorbidities, severity of disease or extent of drug resistance. Findings highlight the importance of innovative regimens to improve outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. (2020-08-12)

New guidelines for managing mucositis now available
New guidelines are now available to provide healthcare professionals with better tools to manage mucositis, a common and often debilitating complication of cancer therapy. (2020-08-11)

Texas A&M researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife
There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-08-11)

Mouthwashes could reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission
Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes. This was demonstrated in cell culture experiments. High viral loads can be detected in the oral cavity and throat of some Covid-19 patients. The use of mouthwashes that are effective against Sars-Cov-2 could thus help to reduce the viral load and possibly the risk of coronavirus transmission over the short term. (2020-08-10)

COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells
A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells. (2020-08-10)

Taste bud cells might not be a target of SARS-CoV-2
An intriguing early symptom among some COVID-19 patients is the loss of the sense of smell and/or taste, which has led to the suspicion that the virus that causes the illness, SARS-CoV-2, could be targeting taste buds. But as researchers report in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, initial data from mice suggest that might not be the case.  (2020-08-05)

COVID-19 may cause deadly blood clots
COVID-19 may increase the risk of blot cots in women who are pregnant or taking estrogen with birth control or hormone replacement therapy, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology. (2020-07-29)

Your brain on birth control
Millions of women have been taking oral contraceptives, but little is known about whether the synthetic hormones found in the oral contraceptives have behavioural and neurophysiological effects, especially during puberty and early adolescence, which are critical periods of brain development. A uOttawa team of researchers found that oral contraceptive use is related to significant structural changes in brain regions implicated in memory and emotional processing. It also alters stress reactivity. (2020-07-28)

Duke-NUS: Cancer mutations caused by bacterial toxin preventable
Reports show that cancer is the second leading cause of death globally. Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School have found DNA mutations in some cancers that link them to a bacterial toxin called colibactin. Their findings, published in the journals Gastroenterology and Genome Research, improve understanding of how some cancers develop, and could help in their prevention. (2020-07-27)

Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask
New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, sheds light on the effects the synthetic estrogens commonly found in birth control pills have on leeches. (2020-07-21)

Researchers ID new target in drive to improve immunotherapy for cancer
UCLA researchers have identified a potential new combination therapy to treat advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the most common type of head and neck cancer. (2020-07-21)

Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers
People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer, suggests a letter published in the journal Gut detailing a prospective study. (2020-07-20)

Oral herpes rates are falling in children
Fewer people are being exposed to herpes simplex type 1 - also known as oral herpes - in their childhood and the prevalence amongst the population in Europe is falling by 1% per year, suggests research published in the journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-07-16)

HIV alone not a risk factor for cavities in children
Recent studies indicate HIV infection heightens the risk of dental cavities - but a Rutgers researcher has found evidence that the risk of cavities comes not from HIV itself but from a weakened immune system, which could be caused by other diseases. (2020-07-15)

Robot jaws shows medicated chewing gum could be the future
Medicated chewing gum has been recognised as a new advanced drug delivery method but currently there is no gold standard for testing drug release from chewing gum in vitro. New research by the University of Bristol has shown a chewing robot with built-in humanoid jaws could provide opportunities for pharmaceutical companies to develop medicated chewing gum. (2020-07-14)

Long-acting injectable form of HIV prevention outperforms daily pill in NIH study
A pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) regimen containing an investigational long-acting form of the HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks was more effective than daily oral Truvada at preventing HIV acquisition among cisgender men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men in a clinical trial sponsored by NIH. Findings from the Phase 2b/3 study, called HPTN 083, will be discussed during the 23rd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2020: Virtual). (2020-07-07)

Targeting bacterial biofilm lynchpin prevents, treats recalcitrant biofilm-mediated infections
A new study highlights two approaches with substantive efficacy and potential for broad application to combat biofilm-mediated diseases. (2020-07-07)

First evidence of snake-like venom glands found in amphibians
Caecilians are limbless amphibians that can be easily mistaken for snakes. Though caecilians are only distantly related to their reptilian cousins, researchers in a study appearing July 3 in the journal iScience describe specialized glands found along the teeth of the ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus), which have the same biological origin and possibly similar function to the venom glands of snakes. As such, caecilians may represent the oldest land-dwelling vertebrate animal with oral venom glands. (2020-07-03)

'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders. (2020-07-03)

Oropharyngeal secretions may help reduce false negative COVID-19 test results
A new study published in the Journal of Dental Research demonstrates that testing of oropharyngeal secretions may reduce the number of false negative results from nasal swab testing of patients who have seemingly recovered from the disease. (2020-07-02)

Use of continuous combined oral contraceptives demonstrates bone health benefits
Women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) become estrogen deficient at an early age, which makes them more vulnerable to the loss of bone mineral density. A new study suggests that use of continuous combined oral contraceptives may be especially effective in reducing bone mass loss. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-06-24)

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