Current Orange Juice News and Events

Current Orange Juice News and Events, Orange Juice News Articles.
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Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia
The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. A study led by Chapman University's Kenjiro Quides tested the boundaries of this relationship -- and found that it's not always as perfectly harmonious as previously thought. Reported in the journal Evolution, the results suggest a hidden conflict in the symbiotic relationship and provides support for the conclusion that rhizobia have an evolutionary advantage. (2021-02-10)

Infant and toddler food product names may not accurately reflect ingredient amounts
The descriptions on the fronts of infant and toddler food packages may not accurately reflect the actual ingredient amounts, according to new research. (2021-02-10)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Juicing technique could influence healthfulness of fresh-squeezed juice
With the New Year, many people are making resolutions to eat healthier, by eating more vegetables, for example. But those who don't like the taste or texture of some vegetables might prefer to drink them in a home-squeezed juice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Food Science & Technology have found that the choice of household juicing technique can influence the phytochemical content and antioxidant activity of common vegetable juices. (2021-01-27)

Bonobos, chimpanzees, and oxytocin
Kyoto University researchers analyze the effects of the hormone oxytocin in our closest primate cousins, bonobos and chimpanzees by tracking their eye movement -- a important indicator of social interaction. Similar to other mammals, oxytocin increases eye contact in bonobos. However, the opposite effect is observed in chimpanzees. Therefore, oxytocin could play a modulating role in the social evolution of the two species. (2021-01-20)

CCNY's David Lohman finds Asian butterfly mimics different species as defense mechanism
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry - mimicking a poisonous species - as a defense against predators. The common palmfly, Elymnias hypermnestra (a species of satyrine butterfly), which is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia, adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy: the females evolved two distinct forms, either orange or dark brown, imitating two separate poisonous model species, Danaus or Euploea. (2021-01-14)

Asian butterfly populations show different mimicry patterns thanks to genetic 'switch'
A new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and the City College of New York (CCNY) has identified a unique, genetic ''mimicry switch'' that determines whether or not male and female Elymnias hypermnestra palmflies mimic the same or different species of butterflies. (2021-01-13)

Asian butterfly mimics other species to defend against predators
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry -- mimicking a poisonous species -- as a defense against predators. The common palmfly Elymnias hypermnestra -- a species of satyrine butterfly that is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia -- adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy. (2021-01-13)

Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae -- including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advantage of different wavelengths of light than other photosynthetic organisms. The study, published Jan. 6, 2020 in Science Advances, yields insights relevant to future energy applications. (2021-01-06)

Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
Currently, the only thing citrus growers can do to protect their crops from HLB is control the insect vector. Dozens of researchers are trying to find ways to manage the disease, using strategies ranging from pesticides to antibiotics to CLas-sniffing dogs. Understanding the plant microbiome, an exciting new frontier in plant disease management, is another strategy. (2021-01-05)

Areas where the next pandemic could emerge are revealed
An international team of human- and animal health experts has incorporated environmental, social and economic considerations -- including air transit centrality - to identify key areas at risk of leading to the next pandemic. Led by the University of Sydney and with academics spanning the United Kingdom, India and Ethiopia, the open-access paper shows the cities worldwide that require collective prompt attention. (2020-11-24)

Can eating mangoes reduce women's facial wrinkles?
A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds eating Ataulfo mangoes, also known as honey or Champagne mangoes, may reduce facial wrinkles in older women with fairer skin. But too much mango may increase wrinkles. (2020-11-19)

Paleontologists uncover three new species of extinct walruses in Orange County
Millions of years ago, in the warm Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California, walrus species without tusks lived abundantly. But in a new study, Cal State Fullerton paleontologists have identified three new walrus species discovered in Orange County and one of the new species has ''semi-tusks'' -- or longer teeth. (2020-11-16)

New insight into how brain neurons influence choices
By studying animals choosing between two drink options, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the activity of certain neurons in the brain leads directly to the choice of one option over another. The findings could lead to better understanding of how decision-making goes wrong in conditions such as addiction and depression. (2020-11-02)

Beetroot peptide as potential drug candidate for treating diseases
In a recent study, a research group led by Christian Gruber at MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology isolated a peptide (small protein molecule) from beetroot. The peptide is able to inhibit a particular enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of messenger molecules in the body. Due to its particularly stable molecular structure and pharmacological properties, the beetroot peptide may be a good candidate for development of a drug to treat certain inflammatory diseases, such as e.g. neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. (2020-10-30)

Dull-colored birds don't see the world like colorful birds do
Bengalese finches -- also called the Society finch -- are a species of brown, black and white birds that don't rely on colorful signals when choosing a mate. Consequently, when presented with a color-perception test that their bright red-beaked cousins the Zebra finches routinely ace, they seem to be paying more attention to differences in brightness than hue. (2020-10-28)

Antibody screening finds COVID-19 nearly 7 times more prevalent in O.C. than thought
Testing a representative sample of Orange County residents for a wide range of coronavirus antibodies, University of California, Irvine researchers found that 11.5 percent of them have antibodies for COVID-19, in contrast to previous estimates of less than 2 percent. (2020-10-28)

RUDN University chemist created a catalyst from orange peel for organic compounds production
N-heterocycles are organic substances used in the chemical industry and medicine. To produce them, expensive catalysts made from noble metals are used. A chemist from RUDN University developed a nanocatalyst for N-heterocycles that consists of zinc oxide and niobium and can be obtained using orange peel without any additional chemical agents. The catalyst makes the reaction almost 100% effective, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of N-heterocycles production. (2020-10-23)

Hubble sees swirls of forming stars
At around 60 million light-years from Earth, the Great Barred Spiral Galaxy, NGC 1365, is captured beautifully in this image by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. (2020-10-09)

Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
Their scientific name is ''Parazoanthus axinellae'' and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea. A genetic analysis suggests they may belong to two different species and, therefore, there could be two types of cluster anemone. Researchers claim this may lead to more effective conservation strategies against the negative impact of climate change on this sea population (2020-09-29)

Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study, co-led by University of Cincinnati researchers, describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil. (2020-09-15)

NASA's Terra highlights aerosols from western fires in danger zone
The year 2020 will be remembered for being a very trying year and western wildfires have just added to the year's woes. (2020-09-10)

Refined finish for fine fish oil
Not all fish oils are high quality oils, so scientists have developed a superior method to help produce better dietary Omega-3 health and dietary supplements. The new process, explained in a new Science of Food paper, defines how vortex fluidic device processing lifts the quality of active ingredients of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in fish oil. The process was used to enrich Omega-3 fatty acid content of apple juice, remarkably without changing its sensory values which is important for the consumer. (2020-09-09)

NTU Singapore scientists use fruit peel to turn old batteries into new
Scientists led by NTU Singapore have developed a novel method of using fruit peel waste to extract and reuse precious metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in order to create new batteries. The scientists say that their waste-to-resource approach tackles both food waste and electronics waste, supporting the development of a circular economy with zero waste (2020-08-26)

Researchers reversibly disable brain pathway in primates
For the first time ever, neurophysiologists of KU Leuven, Harvard and the University of Kyoto have succeeded in reversibly disabling a connection between two areas in the brains of primates while they were performing cognitive tasks, or while their entire brain activity was being monitored. The disconnection had a negative impact on the motivation of the animals, but not on their learning behaviour. The study, which was published in Neuron, may eventually lead to more targeted treatments for certain brain disorders. (2020-08-25)

Research finds daily cranberry intake associated with reduced with reduced H. pylori infection rates
A new clinical trial found consuming cranberry juice containing 44 mg of proanthocyanidins (or ''PACs'') per 240-mL serving twice daily for eight weeks resulted in a 20% reduction in the H. pylori infection rate in Chinese adult participants, when compared to those consuming lower amounts of juice and a placebo. (2020-08-17)

Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact
Image data reanalysis by researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Ganymede. Computer simulation results suggest that this giant crater could have resulted from the impact of an asteroid with a 150km radius. If so, this the largest impact structure identified in the solar system so far. (2020-08-07)

An inventory providing information on more than 200 viruses that infect plants in Brazil
The largest database of plant viruses in Brazil serves as a tool for researchers, growers and policymakers. (2020-08-05)

Green energy and better crops: Tinted solar panels could boost farm incomes
Researchers have demonstrated the use of tinted, semi-transparent solar panels to generate electricity and produce nutritionally-superior crops simultaneously, bringing the prospect of higher incomes for farmers and maximising use of agricultural land. (2020-08-04)

Exploring the sustainability of the Indian sugar industry
Researchers analyzed the interconnected food, water and energy challenges that arise from the sugar industry in India - the second-largest producer of sugar worldwide - and how the political economy drives those challenges. (2020-08-03)

Atomic force microscopy reveals nanoscale dental erosion from beverages
KAIST researchers used atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate how acidic and sugary drinks affect human tooth enamel at the nanoscale level. This novel approach is useful for measuring mechanical and morphological changes that occur over time during enamel erosion induced by beverages. (2020-07-22)

Pressure suppresses carrier trapping in 2D halide perovskite
Here, we show a remarkable PL enhancement by 12 folds using pressure to modulate the structure of a recently developed 2D perovskite (HA)2(GA)Pb2I7 (HA = n?hexylammonium, GA = guanidinium). This structure features an extremely large cage previously unattainable, affording us a rare opportunity to understand the structure?property relationship and explore emergent phenomena in halide perovskites. (2020-07-17)

Transparent inorganic multicolour displays enabled by zinc-based electrochromic devices
Electrochromic displays have been the subject of extensive research as a promising colour display technology. Herein, a transparent inorganic multicolour display platform based on Zn-based electrochromic devices was demonstrated. These devices enable independent operation of top and bottom electrochromic electrodes, thus providing additional configuration flexibility of the devices through the utilization of dual electrochromic layers under the same or different colour states. (2020-07-14)

Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns
Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University. (2020-06-29)

OSU research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines
Suspended, rotating devices known as ''flappers'' may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a new study suggests. (2020-06-24)

Companies spent more than $1 billion in ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks in 2018
Beverage companies spent $1.04 billion to advertise sugary drinks and energy drinks in 2018, a 26% increase compared to 2013, according to Sugary Drinks FACTS 2020, a new report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. The report documents continued extensive targeted advertising of sugary drinks by beverage companies directed to Black and Hispanic youth, which contributes to health disparities affecting communities of color -- the same communities that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. (2020-06-23)

Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar
Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete. More new species are constantly being discovered, often within already well-studied areas. So, in one of the relatively well-studied parks in northern Madagascar, a new species of diamond frog, Rhombophryne ellae, was found in 2017. Now, the discovery is published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2020-06-16)

Which businesses should be open?
A new study by MIT researchers uses a variety of data on consumer and business activity to tackle that question, measuring 26 types of businesses by both their usefulness and risk. Vital forms of commerce that are relatively uncrowded fare the best in the study; less significant types of businesses that generate crowds perform worse. The results can help inform the policy decisions of government officials during the ongoing pandemic. (2020-06-11)

New study of endangered pacific pocket mice provides valuable genetic insights
Drawing on genetic data from six generations of Pacific pocket mice in this program, a new study has tracked reproductive success relative to a mouse's ancestral population. The findings, published this month in the journal Conservation Genetics, indicate that genetic diversity should be introduced from the larger, genetically healthier populations of Pacific pocket mice into a smaller, less healthy population -- and not the reverse. (2020-06-10)

New study finds drinking fruit juice in early years can have long term dietary benefits
A new study from Boston University found that drinking 100% fruit juice early in life was associated with healthier dietary patterns in later childhood without adversely impacting weight gain. The study found that consumption of 100% fruit juice during the preschool years was associated with higher intakes of whole fruit and total fruit as well as better diet quality through childhood and into middle adolescence. (2020-06-09)

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