Current Organic Matter News and Events | Page 25

Current Organic Matter News and Events, Organic Matter News Articles.
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How to free the trapped radicals from the carboxyl?
The removal of carboxyl groups and the release of alkyl radical fragments from the tight binding of carboxyl groups are one of the most interesting and promising directions in organic synthesis, especially in the field of new drug synthesis. Scientists around the world designed various catalysts try to solve this challenge. Young scientists from University of Science and Technology of China has made a big step forward developed a cheap and simple catalyst system. The research is published in Science on Mar 29th. (2019-03-28)

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)

Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics
Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge. Researchers from the United States and China have now developed an innovative interlayer material to improve device stability and electrode performance. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors describe their fullerene-spiked, readily processable ionene polymer, which boosts the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. (2019-03-27)

3D printer threads electronic fibers onto fabrics
The potential for wearable electronics goes far beyond smart watches, but our current options for battery packs and circuit boards don't make for the most comfortable E-socks. One solution, being developed by scientists in China, is to simply print flexible fibers on to transitional textiles or clothes. For example, they printed patterns that can harvest and store electricity onto fabrics. The advance appears March 28 in Matter, a new materials science journal from Cell Press. (2019-03-27)

Physicists constrain dark matter
Researchers from Russia, Finland, and the U.S. have put a constraint on the theoretical model of dark matter particles by analyzing data from astronomical observations of active galactic nuclei. The new findings provide an added incentive for research groups around the world trying to crack the mystery of dark matter: No one is quite sure what it is made of. (2019-03-27)

Simplified synthesis
For the first time researchers discovered a simple and highly efficient way to produce certain kinds of organic compounds. The team from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo report their new method - which uses a novel iron catalyst - can not only simplify organic synthesis but would greatly reduce costs and cut down on waste products. This could have huge implications for industries such as pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, materials and more. (2019-03-27)

New structural phase transition may broaden the applicability of photo-responsive solids
Japanese scientists discovered a new type of structural phase transition of an organic crystal called the photo-triggered phase transition. Under this phenomenon, the crystal, which exhibits a thermal phase transition that is reversible by heating and cooling, transforms to the identical phase upon light irradiation at temperatures lower than the thermal transition temperature. The photo-triggered phase transition may extend functions of photo-responsive solid materials in the future. (2019-03-26)

Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters
A study performed with microorganisms inhabiting floodplains, which comprises 20 percent of the whole Amazon, showed that the microbial food chain produces 10 times more CO2 than the classical food chain, mostly by decomposing organic matter. (2019-03-26)

Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II
The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. Since March 25, 2019, the instrument has been measuring the first particle collisions, which are generated in the modernized SuperKEKB accelerator. The new duo produces more than 50 times the number of collisions compared to its predecessor. The huge increase in evaluable data means that there is not a greater chance of finding out why there is an imbalance between matter and anti-matter in the Universe. (2019-03-25)

New cellulose-based material gives three sensors in one
Cellulose soaked in a carefully designed polymer mixture acts as a sensor to measure pressure, temperature and humidity -- at the same time! The measurements are completely independent of each other. The sensor may be highly significant in fields such as robotics, healthcare and security. (2019-03-25)

How the 'good feeling' can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate
More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively. Nevertheless, the sales figures of these products often remain low, even though they offer advantages for the environment or for society. A team of scientists from the University of Göttingen investigated what factors influence consumers' purchasing intentions. The results were published in the Journal of Cleaner Production, an international scientific publication which covers environmental and sustainable research and practice. (2019-03-22)

Scaling forward
An Argonne scientist has new ways of accelerating the development of new organic materials for electronics. The new approaches could have applications in other types of materials science research. (2019-03-22)

Physicists reveal why matter dominates universe
Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that matter and antimatter decay differently for elementary particles containing charmed quarks. (2019-03-21)

Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes
In mobiles, fridges, planes - transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents. (2019-03-21)

Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens
Food safety regulations increasingly pressure growers to remove hedgerows, ponds and other natural habitats from farms to keep out pathogen-carrying wildlife and livestock. Yet, this could come at the cost of biodiversity. New research published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology encourages the presence of dung beetles and soil bacteria at farms as they naturally suppress E. coli and other harmful pathogens before spreading to humans. (2019-03-19)

Heading towards a tsunami of light
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters. (2019-03-19)

Study shows pressure induces unusually high electrical conductivity in polyiodide
A study into the effects of high mechanical pressure on the polyiodide TEAI showed that it brings unusually high electrical conductivity starting from insulating state, suggesting that the material may be useful as a switchable semiconductor. This system could represent an alternative to gel electrolytes and ionic liquids in dye-synthesized solar cells. The paper, Pressure-induced Polymerization and Electrical Conductivity of a Polyiodide, has been published as a Very Important Paper in Angewandte Chemie. (2019-03-19)

SwRI-led team identifies water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu
A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. Using early spectral data from NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft orbiting the asteroid, the team identified infrared properties similar to those in a type of meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites. (2019-03-19)

New record: Over 16 percent efficiency for single-junction organic solar cells
Two non-fullerene acceptors, namely BTPT-4F and BTPTT-4F, were selected to match with a wide-bandgap polymer donor P2F-EHp consisting of an imide-functionalized benzotriazole moiety, as these materials presented complementary absorption and well-matched energy levels. By delicately optimizing the blend film morphology, an unprecedented power conversion efficiency of over 16% was achieved for the device based on P2F-EHp:BTPTT-4F, suggesting the great promise of materials matching toward high-performance OSCs. (2019-03-18)

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework
For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-organic framework (a solid material with a 3D cage-like structure). (2019-03-18)

AI and MRIs at birth can predict cognitive development at age 2, UNC study finds
Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine used MRI brain scans and machine learning techniques at birth to predict cognitive development at age 2 years with 95 percent accuracy. (2019-03-15)

Powering devices -- with a desk lamp?
Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from ambient indoor lighting. (2019-03-13)

Air pollution causes 800,000 extra deaths a year in Europe and 8.8 million worldwide
Air pollution could be causing double the number of extra deaths a year in Europe than has been estimated previously, according to a study published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-03-12)

The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems
The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar. (2019-03-11)

Researchers turn liquid metal into a plasma
For the first time, researchers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) have found a way to turn a liquid metal into a plasma and to observe the temperature where a liquid under high-density conditions crosses over to a plasma state. Their observations, published in Physical Review Letters, have implications for better understanding stars and planets and could aid in the realization of controlled nuclear fusion -- a promising alternative energy source whose realization has eluded scientists for decades. (2019-03-11)

At the limits of detectability
While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules with their environment. This will accelerate the identification of efficient molecules for future photovoltaic technologies, for example. (2019-03-07)

Chemical hydrogen storage system
Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the liquid hydrogen carrier system has a high theoretical capacity and uses the same catalyst for the charging-discharging reaction. (2019-03-07)

Three ways studying organic chemistry changes the brain
A new study from Carnegie Mellon University researchers using multiple imaging modalities shows that learning scientific information results in changes in the actual structure of memory-related areas of the brain, changes due to the encoding of the new information in these memory-related brain areas, and changes in the coordination among the network nodes that jointly contain the new information. (2019-03-07)

Scientists tackle major challenges to sending astronauts to search for life on Mars
An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster's School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there? (2019-03-06)

Evidence for human involvement in extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene
By re-dating giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentinian Pampas region using more advanced technology, scientists say they have provided evidence that humans hunted and butchered this animal near a swamp during the end of the Pleistocene. (2019-03-06)

Copper catalyst distinguishing two different carbonyl compounds -- synthesis of 1,2-diols
Reductive coupling of two different carbonyl compounds A and B was known to yield three kinds of 1,2-diol, i.e. AB, AA and BB. We have successfully cross-coupled two such compounds to yield AB only, using a new copper catalyst that could distinguish between two different carbonyl compounds. This success is expected to enable selective synthesis of various 1,2-diols, important scaffold chemicals in many pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, etc., from two different carbonyl compounds. (2019-03-05)

Physicists analyze rotational dynamics of galaxies and influence of the photon mass
The rotation of stars in galaxies such as our Milky Way is puzzling. The orbital speeds of stars should decrease with their distance from the center of the galaxy, but in fact they all have the same rotational speed. The physicists Dmitri Ryutov, Dmitry Budker, and Victor Flambaum have hypothesized that the rotational dynamics of galaxies might be explained by the mass of photons, which are particles of light. (2019-03-05)

When changing one atom makes molecules better
The group of Nuno Maulide, recently named the Scientist of the Year 2018 in Austria, in collaboration with the group of Harald Sitte, has now reported a facile method for the replacement of hydrogen with fluorine in important drug molecules. This new discovery enables the fine-tuning of existing (and potential new) pharmaceuticals to endow them with improved pharmacological properties. The results have been recently published in the renowned journal 'Nature Chemistry'. (2019-03-05)

Plasma protein may hold promise for wound scaffolds
Researchers in Germany have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds. The team's new scaffold can be attached or detached from a surface, for either in vitro laboratory tissue studies or direct applications in the body. Their discovery, reported today in the journal Biofabrication, could be extremely useful for future use in wound healing and tissue engineering. (2019-03-04)

Scientists use machine learning to identify high-performing solar materials
Thanks to a study that combines the power of supercomputing with data science and experimental methods, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Cambridge in England have developed a novel 'design to device' approach to identify promising materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). (2019-03-04)

Organic electronics: Scientists develop a high-performance unipolar n-type thin-film transistor
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report a unipolar n-type transistor with a world-leading electron mobility performance of up to 7.16 cm2 V-1 s-1. This achievement heralds an exciting future for organic electronics, including the development of innovative flexible displays and wearable technologies. (2019-03-01)

Dark matter may be hitting the right note in small galaxies
Dark matter may scatter against each other only when they hit the right energy, says international team of researchers in new study. (2019-02-27)

Partners in catalysis: An efficient route to unsaturated ketones
A Japanese research team at Kanazawa University synthesized diverse β,γ-unsaturated ketones through direct reaction of aldehydes and allylic alcohols. An N-heterocyclic carbene acted as an umpolung catalyst, turning the normally electrophilic carbonyl carbon into a nucleophile. Another catalyst, based on phosphine-bound palladium, activated the alcohol. The catalytic synergy enabled both substrates to react without pre-activation, making the process cheaper and greener than traditional methods. (2019-02-25)

Study examines indoor exposure to air pollution
In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents' daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed. (2019-02-21)

UBC researchers explore an often ignored source of greenhouse gas
In a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus, researchers have discovered a surprising new source of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions -- bicarbonates hidden in the lake water used to irrigate local orchards. (2019-02-21)

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