Current Origami News and Events

Current Origami News and Events, Origami News Articles.
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Scientists use DNA origami to monitor CRISPR gene targeting
The remarkable genetic scissors called CRISPR/Cas9, the discovery that won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sometimes cut in places that they are not designed to target. (2021-02-23)

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation
A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips. (2021-02-18)

Graphene "nano-origami" creates tiniest microchips yet
A team of experimental physicists at the University of Sussex have developed the smallest microchips ever - 100 times smaller than conventional microchips. They believe that this next generation of microchips could lead to computers and phones running thousands of times faster. (2021-02-15)

Origami-inspired antenna technology for use in small satellites
In a brand-new study, scientists from Korea and the USA have revealed a novel antenna design for use in CubeSat nanosatellites using state-of-the-art communications systems like 6G communications. Using theoretical knowledge based on origami theory, mechanical dynamics, and antenna array principles, the researchers built a small, lightweight, and reconfigurable antenna for CubeSat depending on operational mode selected. This could potentially mark the beginning of a new era in satellite communications! (2021-02-11)

Energy harvesting: Printed thermoelectric generators for power generation
Thermoelectric generators, TEGs for short, convert ambient heat into electrical power. They enable maintenance-free, environmentally friendly, and autonomous power supply of the continuously growing number of sensors and devices for the Internet of Things (IoT) and recovery of waste heat. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed three-dimensional component architectures based on novel, printable thermoelectric materials. The results are reported in npj Flexible Electronics (DOI: 10.1038/s41528-020-00098-1) and ACS Energy Letters (DOI: 10.1021/acsenergylett.0c02159) (2021-02-05)

An origami-inspired medical patch for sealing internal injuries
MIT engineers have designed an origami-inspired medical patch for minimally invasive sealing of internal injuries, which could also be used in robotic surgery for remote repair of damaged tissues and organs. (2021-02-02)

Origami with DNA
To study the behaviour of T-cells, an unusual method was used at TU Wien: DNA molecules were folded in an ingenious way, similar to the paper folding art origami. In this way, not just a double helix is created, but a rectangular ''molecular raft'' that floats across a cell membrane and serves as a tool for novel measurements. (2021-02-01)

DNA origami enables fabricating superconducting nanowires
In AIP Advances, researchers describe how to exploit DNA origami as a platform to build superconducting nanoarchitectures. The structures they built are addressable with nanometric precision that can be used as a template for 3D architectures that are not possible today via conventional fabrication techniques. Inspired by previous works using the DNA molecule as a template for superconducting nanowires, the group took advantage of a recent bioengineering advance known as DNA origami. (2021-01-19)

NIST publishes a beginner's guide to DNA origami
Jacob Majikes and Alex Liddle, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) who have studied DNA origami for years, have compiled the first detailed tutorial on the technique. (2021-01-08)

Researchers use origami to solve space travel challenge
WSU researchers have used the ancient Japanese art of paper folding to possibly solve a key challenge for outer space travel - how to store and move fuel to rocket engines. The researchers have developed an origami-inspired, folded plastic fuel bladder that doesn't crack at super cold temperatures and could someday be used to store and pump fuel. (2020-12-15)

Making 3D nanosuperconductors with DNA
A platform for making 3D superconducting nano-architectures with a prescribed organization could find application in quantum computing and sensing. (2020-11-10)

Plant inspired: Printing self-folding paper structures for future mechatronics
Natural motion in plants occurs because of cellulose fibers absorbing and releasing water. Now, scientists from Shibaura Institute of Technology and Waseda University, Japan, derive a simple methodology to produce self-folding origami structures based on this concept. Their method, which requires only a standard inkjet printer, could soon allow for the easy fabrication of tailor-made mechatronic devices, enabling novel applications in the healthcare, space, energy, and agriculture fields. (2020-11-09)

SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Justus-Liebig University, Germany, have uncovered how the genome of SARS-CoV-2 - the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 - uses genome origami to infect and replicate successfully inside host cells. (2020-11-05)

Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages. (2020-09-21)

A new twist on DNA origami
A team* of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology. (2020-09-07)

Wool-like material can remember and change shape
SEAS researchers have developed a biocompatible material that can be 3D printed into any shape and pre-programmed with reversible shape memory. The material is made using keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair, nails and shells, extracted from leftover Agora wool used in textile manufacturing. It could be used in anything from self-fitting bras to actuating textiles for medical therapeutics and could help reduce waste in the fashion industry. (2020-09-03)

New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. The team has developed a system of examining individual molecules to detect the presence of disease in blood. (2020-09-02)

Microscopic robots 'walk' thanks to laser tech
A Cornell University-led collaboration has created the first microscopic robots that incorporate semiconductor components, allowing them to be controlled - and made to walk - with standard electronic signals. (2020-08-26)

Building mechanical memory boards using origami
Origami can be used to create mechanical, binary switches, and in Applied Physics Letters, researchers report the fabrication of such a paper device, using the Kresling pattern, that can act as a mechanical switch. By putting several together on a single platform, the investigators built a functioning mechanical memory board. They found that oscillating the platform up and down at a certain speed will cause it to flip, or switch, between its two stable states. (2020-08-25)

Making the DNA melt curve more accurate
NIST researchers find a new (mathematical) twist to improve DNA origami, which could lead to better drug delivery containers and biosensors. (2020-08-19)

Origami microbots: Centuries-old artform guides cutting-edge advances in tiny machines
Origami principles can unlock the potential of the smallest robots, enhancing speed, agility and control in machines no more than a centimeter in size. (2020-07-30)

Origami metamaterials show reversible auxeticity combined with deformation recoverability
New research by Northwestern Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices. (2020-07-27)

Engineers use 'DNA origami' to identify vaccine design rules
Using DNA origami as a virus-like scaffold, MIT researchers designed an HIV-like particle that provokes a strong response from human immune cells grown in the lab. They are now testing this approach as a potential vaccine candidate in live animals, and adapting it to SARS-CoV-2, as well as other pathogens. (2020-06-29)

Kirigami/origami: Unfolding the new regime of advanced 3D micro-/nanofabrication with 'folding'
Emerging kirigami/origami techniques, neither subtractive nor additive, provide an automated fashion for 3D micro-/nanofabrication through folding, bending and twisting of 2D materials/structures. Aiming to shine a glimpse on this new regime, a research team in China reviewed some of the latest kirigami/origami-like 3D fabrication techniques in micro-/nanoscale, including the stimulus strategies and potential applications on reshaping 2D materials, optical reconfigurations, etc. The review is helpful to build new platforms for both physics and application exploration. (2020-05-26)

New rules for the physical basis of cellular organelle composition
New findings about critical cellular structures have upended common assumptions about their formation and composition and provided new insight how molecular machines are built in living cells. (2020-05-06)

Mechanical forces shape animal 'origami' precisely despite 'noise'
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified a new mechanism that helps animals to develop with precise and constant form. The conclusion of this study is that the constancy of animal form requires more than just the deterministic process of genetic inheritance and genetic networks, but also relies on the stochastic and emergent behaviors of mechanical forces. (2020-03-12)

Protecting DNA origami for anti-cancer drug delivery
Scientists coated octahedral-shaped DNA origami with peptoids that help protect the nanostructures in physiological environments relevant to biomedical applications including anti-cancer drug delivery. (2020-03-09)

New DNA origami motor breaks speed record for nano machines
Through a technique known as DNA origami, scientists have created the fastest, most persistent DNA nano motor yet. Angewandte Chemie published the findings, which provide a blueprint for how to optimize the design of motors at the nanoscale -- hundreds of times smaller than the typical human cell. (2020-03-03)

Kirigami designs hold thousands of times their own weight
Researchers find a new set of geometric motifs that can create self-locking, lightweight, durable structures out of soft materials. The kirigami-inspired designs can support 14,000 times their weight and, because they don't require adhesives or fasteners, can easily be flattened and re-folded. (2020-01-21)

Researchers create synthetic nanopores made from DNA
A scientific collaboration led by researchers at iNANO/Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen has resulted in the construction of a synthetic DNA nanopore capable of selectively translocating protein-size macromolecules across lipid bilayers. (2019-12-13)

Self-assembling system uses magnets to mimic specific binding in DNA
A team led by Cornell University physics professors Itai Cohen and Paul McEuen is using the binding power of magnets to design self-assembling systems that potentially can be created in nanoscale form. (2019-11-25)

NUS researchers create new metallic material for flexible soft robots
A team from NUS has created a material that is half as light as paper and highly flexible but also shows enhanced characteristics for electrical conductivity, heat generation, fire-resistance, strain-sensing and is inherently capable of wireless communications. (2019-11-24)

Multimaterial 3D printing manufactures complex objects, fast
3D printing is super cool, but it's also super slow -- it would take 115 days to print a detailed, multimaterial object about the size of a grapefruit. A new method from the Wyss Institue and Harvard SEAS allows printing with up to 8 different inks in a fraction of the time, thanks to special printheads that can seamlessly switch inks up to 50 times per second. (2019-11-13)

Kirigami inspires new method for wearable sensors
As wearable sensors become more prevalent, the need for a material resistant to damage from the stress and strains of the human body's natural movement becomes ever more crucial. To that end, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a method of adopting kirigami architectures to help materials become more strain tolerant and more adaptable to movement. (2019-10-22)

Uncovering the principles behind RNA folding
Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology, Professor Julius Lucks found similarities in the folding tendencies among a family of RNA molecules called riboswitches, which play a pivotal role in gene expression. (2019-10-21)

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed
Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT. (2019-10-11)

Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. They showed that tiny pores on the surface of these capsules can act as ion channels. Their study will accelerate advances in artificial cell engineering and molecular robotics, as well as nanotechnology itself. (2019-09-18)

Hyperbolic paraboloid origami harnesses bistability to enable new applications
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo are looking the 'hypar' origami for ways to leverage its structural properties. (2019-09-17)

Researchers develop new interferometric single-molecule localization microscopy
Prof. XU Tao and Prof. JI Wei from Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new interferometric single molecule localization microscopy with fast modulated structured illumination which named Repetitive Optical Selective Exposure (ROSE). ROSE utilized six different direction and phase interference fringes to excite the fluorescent molecules. (2019-09-09)

Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. The advancement, recently reported in the journal Science Robotics, was demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies and fluttering tree leaves on a kinetic art piece. (2019-08-21)

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