Current Orthopaedic Surgeons News and Events

Current Orthopaedic Surgeons News and Events, Orthopaedic Surgeons News Articles.
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Perception critical to women's breast reconstruction decision making
Women who undergo surgical treatment for breast cancer often also have reconstructive surgery but new research from QUT in Australia reveals many feel left out of the decision making process. Approximately one in every three women surveyed stated their surgeon had more input than they did. (2021-02-18)

Which suicide prevention strategies work?
Columbia University researchers have found that suicide deaths can be reduced by a Federally coordinated approach employing scientifically proven options. (2021-02-18)

High patient uptake for text message system monitoring opioid use in real-time
Among the orthopaedic surgery patients in a study using text messaging to monitor opioid use, 61 percent of their tablets were found to be left over (2021-02-17)

Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new approach to X-ray imaging can help surgeons performing breast cancer tumour removal surgery, giving 2.5 times better detection of diseased tissue around the edge of the tumour than with standard imaging. (2021-02-17)

Study: Screen surgery patients for frailty
A study of mortality after various kinds of surgery suggests that frailty, a clinical syndrome marked by slow walking speed, weak grip and other indicators, should be assessed before all noncardiac surgeries. Dr. Paula Shireman of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is one of the coauthors on the multicenter research. (2021-02-17)

NIH research funding to support surgeon scientists is rising
Since 2010, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to support surgeon scientists has, remarkably, risen significantly while funding to support other non-surgeon physicians has significantly decreased. This growth has occurred despite an overall decrease in NIH funding and an increase in demand for clinical productivity. (2021-02-12)

Glitch in genome architecture may cause B-cell malignancies
Restoring an enzyme that maintains the way chromosomes are packed inside cells may lead to new therapies for some blood cancers, according to a new study by Columbia researchers. (2021-02-01)

'COVID effect' leads to fewer heart surgeries, more patient deaths
The most deadly global health crisis in a century has resulted in a substantial decline in overall heart surgery volume and an unexplained increase in deaths after coronary artery bypass grafting. (2021-01-30)

Trauma surgeons and emergency surgeons positively impact patient satisfaction
A large study has found that effective and meaningful physician communication is a more important contributor to the overall satisfaction of trauma patients and those having emergency surgery than it is for patients admitted to the hospital for medical reasons or for elective procedures. (2021-01-29)

How fat loss accelerates facial aging
For many of us, as we get older the skin on our face begins to sag and we seem to lose volume around our eyes, cheeks and chin. Is gravity taking its toll in our later years or do we lose fat over the course of several years that many of us associate with youth, vibrancy and energy? Understanding the cause is paramount to how plastic surgeons treat the signs of facial aging. (2021-01-27)

Scientists use a novel ink to 3D print 'bone' with living cells
3D printers may one day become a permanent fixture of the operating theatre after UNSW scientists showed they could print bone-like structures containing living cells. (2021-01-25)

Ideal surgical results less likely if cancer patients live vulnerable communities
A new study finds that older cancer patients are less likely to have optimal results following their cancer operation if they live in an area highly affected by social challenges, especially if they are racial-ethnic minorities. (2021-01-25)

Global demand for cancer surgery set to surge
A new modelling study led by UNSW predicts demand for cancer surgery will rise by 52 per cent within two decades, with low-income countries bearing the greatest burden. (2021-01-24)

Study shows number and variety of issues experienced by staff wearing
A new study analysing the impact of PPE staff shows that the number and variety of issues they experience increases as their time in PPE without a break increases, ranging from tiredness and headaches in the first hour to nausea, vomiting and dizziness as they head towards four hours continuously in PPE. (2021-01-21)

Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain (2021-01-15)

Neither 'meniscal' nor 'mechanical' symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these ''meniscal'' and ''mechanical'' symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-14)

Non-Hispanic Black patients are disproportionately left off liver transplant waitlists
A new study of liver transplant centers confirms that non-Hispanic white patients get placed on liver transplant waitlists at disproportionately higher rates than non-Hispanic Black patients. (2021-01-11)

Good results for groin hernia operations not performed by doctors in Sierra Leone
In countries with a severe shortage of surgeons it is common for some operations to be done by medical staff with lower formal qualifications. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have led a study on the safety and efficacy of a common surgical procedure. The study, published in JAMA Network Open, shows that inguinal hernia operations performed by associate clinicians at a Sierra Leone hospital were just as safe and effective as those performed by doctors. (2021-01-11)

More women embracing 'going flat' after mastectomy
A growing number of women forgoing reconstruction after a mastectomy say they're satisfied with their choice, even as some did not feel supported by their physician, according to a study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2021-01-04)

The evolving role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in plastic surgery
Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment, which involves injecting a small amount of a patient's own blood to release various growth factors from platelets, continues to increase in popularity. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has tracked the procedure since 2015 and reports a 25 percent increase in cosmetic PRP use in the last four years. (2020-12-28)

Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light. (2020-12-22)

Virtual kidney transplant evaluation allows patients to be evaluated from home
A virtual telehealth platform is allowing the surgery program at the Medical University of South Carolina to evaluate and wait-list patients for kidney transplantation despite reductions in direct, in-person health care visits brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Remote monitoring leads to 4x decline in returns to hospital after joint surgery
The rate of hospital readmissions for hip and knee replacement patients declined from roughly 12 percent to 3 percent when they were enrolled in a ''hovering'' program (2020-12-21)

What's the 'true' rate of dislocation after total hip replacement?
The cumulative incidence of hip dislocation following total hip replacement is about 50 percent higher than suggested by simple analysis of hospital data, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-18)

Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy during COVID-19 surge
Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers from the University of Cincinnati explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge. The study has been selected for the 2020 Southern Surgical Association Program. (2020-12-17)

Drug may boost vaccine responses in older adults
A drug that boosts the removal of cellular debris in immune cells may increase the protective effects of vaccines in older adults, a study published today in eLife shows. (2020-12-15)

Financial distress negatively impacts well-being, satisfaction of breast cancer patients
Financial toxicity among breast cancer patients is independently associated with worse psychological well-being following a mastectomy or lumpectomy operation. However, even small improvements in financial pressure associated with treatment-related costs can lead to better mental well-being and higher patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction. (2020-12-11)

A surgeon's birthday may be a dicey day for older patients
Older people who undergo emergency surgeries on their operating surgeon's birthday may be more likely to die within a month than patients who go through similar procedures on other days, a new UCLA-led study suggests. (2020-12-10)

Risk of serious complications during knee replacement 73% higher when a tourniquet is used
The risk of developing serious complications following a knee replacement could be up to 73% higher when a tourniquet is used, compared to surgery without a tourniquet. Serious complications during knee replacement surgery are rare. However, researchers at the University of Warwick found that 5.9% of patients whose operations involved a tourniquet had serious complications needing additional health care, compared to 2.9% in those operated on without a tourniquet. (2020-12-08)

Operations on screen: Creating an accessible surgery simulator
The Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) is hosting a project to create a low-cost surgery simulator; a much more accessible tool than those currently available and which could be used to train both surgeons who are in the early stages of their career and those who are more experienced. (2020-12-02)

From the woodworking shop to the operating room: New technique uses mortise and tenon joints to repair unstable shoulders
Orthopaedic surgery techniques for treatment of recurrent shoulder instability are effective, but prone to problems with nonunion of bone grafts held in place by screws alone. A new technique - borrowing a design used for centuries in Chinese architecture and woodworking - provides an effective approach to shoulder stabilization, suggests a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-24)

Medicaid expansion may result in earlier diagnosis of colon cancer
The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion for low-income people appears to lead to earlier diagnosis of colon cancer, enhanced access to care, and improved surgical care for patients with this common cancer. (2020-11-23)

Potential cellular target for eliminating bone breakdown in osteoporosis found
By disabling a function of a set of cells in mice, researchers appear to have halted the process that breaks down bone, a potential boon for osteoporosis treatment (2020-11-20)

Surgeons' expectations more accurate in predicting outcomes after lumbar spine surgery
Surgeons' preoperative expectations were more accurate than patients' expectations in predicting patient-reported outcomes two years after lumbar spine surgery, according to a longitudinal study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). (2020-11-18)

3D bioprinted heart provides new tool for surgeons
Surgeons will soon have a powerful new tool for planning and practice with the creation of the first full-sized 3D bioprinted model of the human heart. (2020-11-18)

3D-printed, lifelike heart models could help train tomorrow's surgeons (video)
Full-size, realistic models of human organs could help surgeons train and practice before they cut into a patient. However, it's been challenging to make inexpensive models of a size, complexity and material that simulates human organs. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a way to 3D print a full-size model of a patient's own heart. (2020-11-18)

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). (2020-11-17)

Simultaneous kidney transplant plus weight loss surgery safe for obese patients
A new study shows that robotic-assisted kidney transplant and weight loss surgery can be performed safely. (2020-11-10)

New study reveals disturbing surge in violent injuries during stay-at-home orders
The social isolation brought on by stay-at-home orders (SAHO) issued in the early phase of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have a deadly and dangerous side effect: an increase in intentional penetrating injuries, especially firearm violence, that has remained at high levels even as stay-at-home orders have subsided and as COVID-19 cases are on an upswing. (2020-11-09)

Rapid test shows 'solid performance' for diagnosing infection around joint implants
The recently FDA-authorized alpha-defensin lateral flow test is a highly accurate, ten-minute test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) - a serious and costly complication of total joint replacement, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-09)

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