Current Osteoporosis News and Events | Page 2

Current Osteoporosis News and Events, Osteoporosis News Articles.
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Certain factors during infancy may affect bone health in adulthood
In a recent study, breast feeding during infancy was associated with a lower risk of lower limb fractures when children reached young adulthood, while maternal smoking was associated with a higher risk of upper limb fractures. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (2020-07-08)

Response to stimulation in IVF may predict longer term health risks
A follow-up study of almost 20,000 young women who had a first cycle of IVF in Denmark between 1995 and 2014 indicates that those who responded poorly to treatment, with few eggs collected, are at a significantly increased risk of later age-related diseases. (2020-07-08)

New research highlights potential cardiovascular risk of novel anti-osteoporotic drug
Research presents new evidence which strengthens the plausibility that treatment with the novel anti-osteoporotic medicine, romosozumab, may lead to excess cardiovascular complications. Writing in Science Translational Medicine, the authors, from the University of Oxford's Big Data Institute and the Nuffield Department of Population Health, report that by combining data across clinical trials of romosozumab, there is some evidence that use of this drug leads to increased cardiovascular risk. (2020-06-24)

Romosozumab in osteoporosis: Considerable added benefit for women after menopause
Treatment leads to fewer vertebral fractures and to fewer other typical fractures in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis at high risk of fracture. (2020-06-15)

Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages. They are necessary for the maintenance and renewal of bones. But the intracellular mechanisms through which macrophages convert to osteoclasts are not fully understood. Recently, scientists at the Tokyo University of Science uncovered the role of a protein called Cpeb4 in this process. Their findings suggest potential therapeutic targets for bone and joint diseases like arthritis and osteoporosis. (2020-06-09)

Osteoporosis treatment may also protect against pneumonia
A recent study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as alendronate, which are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, are linked with lower risks of pneumonia and of dying from pneumonia. (2020-06-03)

New guidelines for assessment of bone density and microarchitecture in vivo with HR-pQCT
There is an urgent need for guidance and consensus on the methods for, and reporting of, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) imaging so that different studies can be compared to each other. This position paper, published by a joint working group from IOF, ASBMR and ECTS addresses the need for standardization of techniques and terminology, provides guidance on interpretation and reporting of results, and discusses unresolved issues in the field. (2020-06-02)

Dairy consumption ineffective in preventing age-related bone loss or fractures
Dairy products provide more bone-beneficial nutrients than any other food group. Yet a new study based on data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) shows that during the menopause transition, when bone loss is accelerated, they offer little benefit in preventing bone mineral density loss or fractures. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-05-27)

Worldwide IOF-ISCD survey of bone densitometry units published
A landmark global study of fracture liaison services carried out at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit at University of Southampton in collaboration with the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD), 25% of DXA facilities report not being accredited by professional or government organizations. The survey also found that adherence to many basic DXA quality assurance and reporting procedures was confirmed by less than 50% of services. (2020-05-15)

European countries face a costly 23% increase in fragility fractures by 2030
A new study provides an overview and comparison of the burden and management of fragility fractures due to osteoporosis in the five largest countries in Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom) as well as Sweden. The publication 'Fragility fractures in Europe: burden, management and opportunities' has been authored by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) steering committee in cooperation with experts from national societies. (2020-04-27)

Socioeconomics, metabolic syndrome, and osteopenia in postmenopausal women
The increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has prompted multiple research studies to understand why. A new study from South Korea examined the association of socioeconomic status-related factors, unhealthy lifestyles, and diet-related factors with the coexistence of metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-04-22)

New guidance for the assessment of Fracture Liaison Services at a patient outcome level
The IOF Capture the Fracture® Working Group in collaboration with the FFN Secondary Fragility Fracture Special Interest Group and NOF has developed a patient-level Key Performance Indicator (KPI) set for Fracture Liaison Services (FLSs). The patient-level KPIs will help FLS examine their current performance and add service improvement cycles to their routine service provision, and will permit further benchmarking against FLSs regionally, nationally and internationally. (2020-04-16)

Drinking weakens bones of people living with HIV: BU study
For people living with HIV, any level of alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, raising the risk of osteoporosis, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. (2020-03-03)

Risk of recurrent fractures lowered by new care routines
Older people's risk of recurrent fractures decreases by 18 percent if the care they receive is more structured and preventive, through fracture liaison services. This is shown by a study from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2020-02-27)

Endocrine Society updates osteoporosis Clinical Practice Guideline
The Endocrine Society today announced an update to its osteoporosis Clinical Practice Guideline to include recommendations for romosozumab, a new medication that was approved last year to treat postmenopausal women at high risk of fracture. (2020-02-18)

Postmenopause vitamin D deficiency associated with disc degeneration and lower back pain
Lumbar disc degeneration and resulting lower back pain become greater concerns with age and disproportionately affect women more than men, likely as a result of decreasing estrogen levels during menopause. A new study demonstrates that vitamin D deficiency, smoking, high body mass index (BMI), and osteoporosis are risk factors for greater back pain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-02-12)

Gene therapy prevents disorders with alcohol exposure in ALDH2 deficiency
A new study has shown that gene therapy to treat one of the most common hereditary disorders, aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) deficiency, may prevent increased risk for esophageal cancer and osteoporosis associated with chronic alcohol exposure. (2020-02-12)

Are BMD and CT-FEA effective surrogate markers of femoral bone strength?
An International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) position paper reviews experimental and clinical evidence showing that hip bone strength estimated by bone mineral density (BMD) and/or finite element analysis (FEA) reflects the actual strength of the proximal femur. The paper 'Perspectives on the noninvasive evaluation of femoral strength in the assessment of hip fracture risk,' published in Osteoporosis International, is authored by experts from the IOF Working Group on Hip Bone Strength as a Therapeutic Target. (2020-01-22)

Investigational drugs block bone loss in mice receiving chemotherapy
Studying mice, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a driver of bone loss related to cancer treatment. Radiation and chemotherapy can halt cell division in bone, which results in a stress response called senescence. This process is independent of hormones that affect bone health, such as estrogen. Such bone loss can be stopped by treating the mice with either of two investigational drugs already being evaluated in clinical trials, according to the researchers. (2020-01-13)

Earlier falls predict subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women
The risk of fracture in postmenopausal women can be predicted by history of falls, according to new findings from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) at the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Osteoporosis International, the study is the first to follow up on the association between history of falls and subsequent fractures. (2020-01-09)

Bone bandage soaks up pro-healing biochemical to accelerate repair
Researchers at Duke University have engineered a patch or bandage that captures a pro-healing molecule called adenosine that briefly surges at the site of a bone break or fracture to accelerate and improve the natural healing process. In a proof-of-principle study with mice, the bandage helped to accelerate callus formation and vascularization to achieve better bone repair by three weeks. (2019-12-13)

Bone and muscle health can 'make or break' care as we age
Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work -- reported this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) -- can help yield hard evidence to address the range of 'soft tissue' and bone disorders that contribute to falls, fractures, and muscle loss as we age. (2019-12-04)

Bone breakthrough may lead to more durable airplane wings
Cornell researchers have made a new discovery about how seemingly minor aspects of the internal structure of bone can be strengthened to withstand repeated wear and tear, a finding that could help treat patients suffering from osteoporosis. It could also lead to the creation of more durable, lightweight materials for the aerospace industry. (2019-11-21)

New IOF-ESCEO position paper offers practical guidance for osteoporosis management
The position paper summarizes the 2018 'European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women' in an international setting, with a focus on the categorisation of risk as a strategy to target therapeutic interventions. Algorithms illustrate possible decision pathways for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, based on the absolute risk of fracture (FRAX®) and an assessment strategy permitting the classification of low, high and very high risk of fractures. (2019-11-20)

Shortened sleep may negatively affect women's bone health
Getting too little sleep was linked with a higher risk of having low bone mineral density (BMD) and developing osteoporosis, as reported in a recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of postmenopausal women. (2019-11-06)

Recommendations to prevent secondary fractures in adults 65+ with osteoporosis
A multistakeholder coalition assembled by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) has issued clinical recommendations for the optimal prevention of secondary fracture among people aged 65 years and older with a hip or vertebral fracture -- the most serious complication associated with osteoporosis. (2019-10-02)

Statins could increase or decrease osteoporosis risk -- the dosage makes the difference
A study by the Medical University of Vienna and the Complexity Science Hub Vienna shows for the first time a connection between the dosage of cholesterol-lowering drugs -- statins -- and the diagnosis of osteoporosis. (2019-09-30)

Task force provides insights and direction on cell-based therapies
A new report published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and concurrently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research. (2019-09-23)

Novel approach to ultrasound raises possibility of new medical applications
A new ultrasound technique provides a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale. Researchers hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment. (2019-09-17)

HTA in the European network: Osteoporosis screening without proof of benefit
For the first time, IQWiG was in charge of a health technology assessment for the European network EUnetHTA. According to the conclusion, the benefit of osteoporosis screening is not proven. (2019-09-17)

Types and rates of co-existing conditions in diabetes are different for men and women
A new study presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20, 2019) shows that men and women experience different comorbidities (other diseases at the same time) as having diabetes or prediabetes, as well as an unexpectedly high rate of prediabetes among children aged 6-10 years. (2019-09-15)

How babies absorb calcium could be key to treating osteoporosis in seniors
New research reveals the mechanism that allows breastfeeding babies to absorb large amounts of calcium and build healthy bones -- a discovery that could lead to treatment for osteoporosis and other bone diseases later in life. The researchers identified calcium-absorbing channels in the lower two-thirds of the small intestines of breastfed infant mice in a paper published earlier this month in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. (2019-09-10)

Weight change and bone health in older adults with obesity
Weight loss in older adults is accompanied by loss in bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of bone fracture. A new study published in Obesity found that loss of hip BMD persists in the year following a weight loss intervention among older adults with obesity, regardless of whether they regain weight. (2019-09-05)

Vitamin D: How much is too much of a good thing?
A three-year study by researchers at the Cumming School of Medicine's McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), showed there is no benefit in taking high doses of vitamin D. More research is required to determine if high doses may actually compromise bone health. (2019-09-03)

New pharmaceutical target reverses osteoporosis in mice
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered that an adenosine receptor called A2B can be pharmaceutically activated to reverse bone degradation caused by osteoporosis in mouse models of the disease. (2019-08-21)

Migraine diagnoses positively associated with all-cause dementia
Several studies have recently focused on the association between migraine headaches and other headaches and dementia and found a positive migraine-dementia relationship. However, most of these studies have failed to simultaneously adjust for several common comorbidities, thus potentially introducing bias into their findings. (2019-08-14)

Optimal vitamin D levels may vary for different ethnic and racial groups
When recommending vitamin D supplements, doctors should look at each individual patient as having different requirements and not rely on 'one-size-fits-all' guidelines, according to a study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of California, San Francisco. (2019-08-14)

Osteoporosis drugs linked to reduced risk of premature death
A large cohort study has revealed a common osteoporosis drug significantly decreases premature mortality risk, likely related to a reduction in bone loss. (2019-08-12)

Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty
A new study from the University of Bristol has linked bone strength to the timing of puberty. (2019-08-09)

IOF review of impact of drug holidays on bone health
The impact of interruption of anti-osteoporosis treatment in patients on therapy with bisphosphonates or denosumab is reviewed in a new IOF Working Group paper. The aim of the study was to assess what evidence exists to inform decision making on drug holidays and to identify any indicators that might help clinicians decide whether to continue or discontinue therapy in individual patients. (2019-07-08)

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