Current Pacemaker News and Events

Current Pacemaker News and Events, Pacemaker News Articles.
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New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure. A team of Swiss and Canadian scientists have developed a treatment that allows patients to regain control of their blood pressure, using targeted electrical spinal-cord stimulation. No medication is required. The team's findings were published today in Nature. (2021-01-28)

Five-minute EEG recordings: a key to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull. Researchers from Leipzig University Hospital and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences recently published these new findings in the journal Brain. (2020-12-09)

A meta-analysis of major complications between traditional pacemakers and leadless pacemakers
A Meta-analysis of Major Complications between Traditional Pacemakers and Leadless Pacemakers. In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0596, Diyu Cui, Yimeng Liao, Jianlin Du and Yunqing Chen from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider major complications between traditional pacemakers and leadless pacemakers. (2020-11-19)

Implantation of an S-ICD in a patient with a DDD pacemaker and congenitally corrected transposition
Implantation of an S-ICD in a Patient with a DDD Pacemaker and Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries. In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0597, Yu Zhang, Wen-Long Dai, Can-Can Lin, Qiao-Yuan Li and Cheng-Jun Guo from Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider implantation of an S-ICD in a patient with a DDD pacemaker and congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. (2020-11-19)

Solitary bees are born with a functional internal clock - unlike honeybees
Individuals of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis show a 24-h behavioral cycle as soon as they emerge, unlike young honeybee workers who need to perform brood care around the clock and only develop a daily cycle later in life. This is reflected in a difference in the rate of brain development: in O. bicornis, but not in honeybees, neurons producing the ''pacemaker'' neuromodulator PDF are already maximally active immediately upon emergence. Sociality seems to have promoted a delay in maturation of the internal clock. (2020-11-16)

MRI safely performed in patients with pacemakers and ICDs
MRI examinations can be performed safely in patients with non-MR compatible cardiac devices, including those who are pacemaker-dependent or have abandoned leads, according to a new study. (2020-10-22)

Good vibrations for new energy
Imagine a mobile phone charger that doesn't need a wireless or mains power source. Or a pacemaker with inbuilt organic energy sources within the human body. Australian researchers led by Flinders University are picking up the challenge of 'scavenging' invisible power from low-frequency vibrations in the surrounding environment, including wind, air or even contact-separation energy (static electricity). (2020-10-21)

New bioprosthetic valve for TAVR fails to demonstrate non-inferiority
In a randomized clinical trial, SCOPE II, a new self-expanding bioprosthetic valve used in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) failed to demonstrate non-inferiority compared to an existing self-expanding valve. (2020-10-15)

First treatment identified for fainting
Fainting affects one in two people during their lifetime. Those with recurrent episodes are often afraid to socialise or go to work. Today researchers report the first effective therapy. The late breaking research is presented at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-09-01)

Pilot study suggests Parkinson's disease progression can be slowed
Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) implanted in early stage Parkinson's disease decreases the risk of disease progression and the need to prescribe multiple drugs to patients simultaneously, according to a five-year outcomes study of 30 patients released in the July 2020, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-06-29)

Every heart dances to a different tune
Play the same piece of music to two people, and their hearts can respond very differently. That's the conclusion of a novel study presented today on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-05-20)

No need to steer clear of electric cars if you have a pacemaker
A study published in Technology and Health Care shows that four leading brands of e-cars do not trigger electromagnetic interference (EMI) with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED). CIEDs like pacemakers and defibrillators may malfunction when they are exposed to strong electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by powerful motors. While rare events, such errors could have serious consequences for patients. (2020-04-07)

Texas Heart Institute and UCLA reveal innovative pacing system in Scientific Reports
Researchers at Texas Heart Institute and UCLA crossed a major milestone in the development of a wirelessly powered, leadless pacemaker and further advanced the possibility of using wirelessly powered, biventricular pacing to address cardiac resynchronization challenges. In Nature Research Scientific Reports, they reported the first proof of the novel pacing system's ability to provide synchronized biventricular pacing in a closed chest and open chest, preclinical research model. (2020-02-13)

Locomotor engine in the spinal cord revealed
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have revealed a new principle of organization which explains how locomotion is coordinated in vertebrates akin to an engine with three gears. The results are published in the scientific journal Neuron. (2020-01-22)

Physics shows that imperfections make perfect
For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated that certain systems with interacting entities can synchronize only if the entities within the system are different from one another. (2020-01-20)

Developing next-generation biologic pacemakers
University of Houston associate professor of pharmacology Bradley McConnell is helping usher in a new age of cardiac pacemakers by using stem cells found in fat, converting them to heart cells, and reprogramming those to act as biologic pacemaker cells. (2019-12-16)

Protection for pacemakers
A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients. (2019-11-21)

Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. Eighty percent of patients who were prescribed opioids had never taken them before. Investigators stress the importance of improving postoperative pain management following cardiac device procedures to reduce use of prescription opioids. (2019-10-21)

Brain stimulation for PTSD patients
University of Houston assistant professor of electrical engineering Rose T. Faghih reports that the tiny beads of sweat, which appear in patients experiencing PTSD or other neuropsychiatric disorders, can be measured and used to design and more responsive brain stimulator for therapy. (2019-08-07)

Newly discovered neural pathway processes acute light to affect sleep
Either to check the time or waste time, people often look at their smartphones after waking in the middle of the night. While this acute burst of light does make it more difficult to fall back to sleep, a new Northwestern University study reports that it won't interfere with the body's overall circadian rhythms. (2019-07-19)

Beat the heat
University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much more efficient at converting radiant heat to energy. (2019-07-10)

Blood pressure and glucose control may prevent common arrhythmia
Blood-pressure and glucose control may be effective in preventing heart block, a common form of arrhythmia, and the subsequent need for a pacemaker, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2019-05-24)

Dead zones in circadian clocks
Circadian clocks of organisms respond to light signals during night but do not respond in daytime. The time window where circadian clocks are insensitive to light signals is referred to as the 'dead zone'. Researchers from Kanazawa University have proposed a mechanism for the daytime dead zone. They report that saturation of a single biochemical reaction in the gene regulatory network that controls circadian oscillations can create a daytime dead zone in different species. (2019-05-14)

Treatment to restore natural heartbeat could be on the horizon for heart failure
A new therapy to re-engage the heart's natural electrical pathways -- instead of bypassing them -- could mean more treatment options for heart failure patients who also suffer from electrical disturbances, such as arrhythmias, according to research led by the University of Chicago Medicine. (2019-05-10)

Scientists develop way to perform supercomputer simulations of the heart on cellphones
You can now perform supercomputer simulations of the heart's electrophysiology in real time on desktop computers and even cellphones. A team of scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech developed a new approach that can not only help diagnose heart conditions and test new treatments, but pushes the boundaries of cardiac science by opening up a floodgate of new cardiac research and education. (2019-03-29)

U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks
What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, the surprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells. (2019-03-27)

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat
Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats, according to a report in ACS Nano. The device was successfully tested in pigs, which have a similar physiology to humans. (2019-02-20)

Engineers harvest heart's energy to power life-saving devices
The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge life-saving devices, according to new research from Dartmouth. Using a dime-sized invention developed by engineers at Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering, the heart's energy can be harnessed to power implantable devices, according to the study. Creating an energy source within the body could save millions of people who rely on pacemakers and other implantable devices from having to undergo surgery to replace batteries. (2019-02-04)

Tiny pacemakers aim to make infant heart surgeries less invasive, while cutting operating costs and time
Rohan Kumthekar, M.D., a cardiology fellow at Children's National, presents a prototype for a miniature pacemaker, about the size of an almond, which aims to make pacemaker procedures for infants less invasive, less painful, and more efficient, measured by shorter surgeries, faster recovery times and reduced medical costs. (2018-11-09)

Societies publish new guidance for the treatment of slow, irregular heartbeats
The American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society today released a guideline for the evaluation and treatment of patients with bradycardia, or a slow heartbeat, and cardiac conduction disorders. (2018-11-06)

Wearable defibrillator lowers sudden cardiac death, but only when you wear it
An international clinical trial that studied wearable cardioverter defibrillators (WCDs) found that the devices did not significantly reduce sudden cardiac death -- the primary goal of the device -- among patients assigned to the device in the first 90 days after a heart attack, but did lower mortality among those who wore it as prescribed, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2018-09-26)

Results from the SOLVE-TAVI trial reported at TCT 2018
The first randomized study to compare general versus local anesthesia during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with intermediate to high surgical risk found local anesthesia to be both safe and effective. In addition, the study found that a current generation balloon-expandable valve had similar outcomes to a current generation self-expanding one. (2018-09-23)

Security millimetre wave body scanner safe for patients with pacemakers and defibrillators
Munich, Germany -- Aug. 26, 2018: Body scanners used for security checks are safe for patients with pacemakers and defibrillators, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2018. (2018-08-26)

The danger of coronary artery compression in children is more common than we think
The incidence of coronary artery compression in children fitted with epicardial pacemakers may be slightly more common than previously believed, say noted cardiologists. After reviewing patient records at Boston Children's Hospital, they advocate for stricter monitoring to identify patients at risk and prevent complications. Their recommendations are published as a featured article in the journal HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society. (2018-08-13)

The rules of attraction: Scientists find elusive molecule that helps sperm find egg
A recent report in Nature Communications by scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory identifies a key molecule driving chemoattraction between sperm and egg cells in marine invertebrates. (2018-08-03)

Genetic basis of heart rhythms explored in large population study
New information about the biology behind the heart's electrical activity has been revealed in a major genome study with the largest sample size ever of a project of this type. These molecular mechanisms offer insights into cardiac electrical diseases and could suggest avenues of drug research for preventing and treating heart rhythm or conduction problems. Genes in 44 loci identified as associated with the PR interval on an EKG are overrepresented in cardiac disease processes, including heart block, sick sinus syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. (2018-07-27)

Novel micropacemaker takes new approach to faulty heart rhythms
Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Southern California have demonstrated the feasibility of implanting a micropacemaker system in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart -- a breakthrough that may open up new cardiac pacing options for children and adults. (2018-06-26)

Cleveland clinic- led study shows leadless pacemaker patients experience less complications
Patients receiving leadless pacemakers experience overall fewer short-term and mid-term complications than those receiving traditional transvenous pacemakers, a Cleveland Clinic-led research study found. The study was published today in the journal Heart Rhythm. (2018-06-26)

Enigma of fatty acid metabolism solved: Enzyme shape controls its activity
Fats are essential for our body. The core components of all fats are fatty acids. Their production is initiated by the enzyme ACC. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now demonstrated how ACC assembles into distinct filaments. As the researchers report in (2018-06-13)

His bundle pacing: rebirth of an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction system
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 61-71(11); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0030), Michael R. Kaufmann, Matthew S. McKillop, Thomas A. Burkart, Mark Panna, William M. Miles and C. Richard Conti from the Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, US consider His bundle pacing; an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction system. (2018-06-10)

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