Current Paint News and Events

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Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems
Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems. (2021-01-21)

New biochemical clues in cell receptors help explain how SARS-CoV-2 may hijack human cells
The SARS-CoV-2 virus may enter and replicate in human cells by exploiting newly-identified sequences within cell receptors, according to work from two teams of scientists. (2021-01-21)

Scientists paint multi-color atlas of the brain
Columbia scientists have engineered a coloring technique, known as NeuroPAL (a Neuronal Polychromatic Atlas of Landmarks), which makes it possible to identify every single neuron in the mind of a worm. (2021-01-08)

Do the benefits of Christmas outweigh its harms?
The Christmas season is associated with preventable harms from cards, tree decorations, and presents, as well as overeating and overdrinking, so do the benefits of Christmas outweigh the harms? In the Christmas issue of The BMJ, Robin Ferner and Jeffrey Aronson dig out some cautionary tales from the archives. (2020-12-16)

Researchers demonstrate nondestructive mid-infrared imaging using entangled photons
Researchers have shown that entangled photons can be used to improve the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in highly scattering materials. The method represents a way to perform OCT with mid-infrared wavelengths and could be useful for non-destructive testing and analysis of materials such as ceramics and paint samples. (2020-12-10)

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal ''Soft Matter'' as an ''Emerging Investigator'' article. (2020-11-26)

What EEGs tell us about COVID-19 and the brain
A systematic review of hundreds of cases of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 helps painting a broader picture of how COVID-19 affects the brain. (2020-10-27)

This white paint keeps surfaces cooler than surroundings, even under direct sunlight
Scientists have developed a white paint that cools below the temperature of its ambient surroundings even under direct sunlight. Their research, published October 21, 2020 in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science, demonstrates a radiative cooling technology that could be used in commercial paints, that could be less expensive to manufacture, and that passively reflects 95.5% of sunlight that reaches its surface back into outer space. (2020-10-21)

Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving. (2020-10-19)

Robot swarms follow instructions to create art
Controlling a swarm of robots to paint a picture sounds like a difficult task. However, a new technique allows an artist to do just that, without worrying about providing instructions for each robot. Using this method, the artist can assign different colors to specific areas of a canvas, and the robots will work together to paint the canvas. The technique could open up new possibilities in art and other fields. (2020-10-14)

New way of analyzing soil organic matter will help predict climate change
A new way of analyzing the chemical composition of soil organic matter will help scientists predict how soils store carbon -- and how soil carbon may affect climate in the future, says a Baylor University researcher. (2020-09-25)

Guiding light: Skoltech technology puts a light-painting drone at your fingertips
Skoltech researchers have designed and developed an interface that allows a user to direct a small drone to light-paint patterns or letters through hand gestures. The new interface, DroneLight, can be used in distant communications, entertainment, and even search and rescue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdnIqLjtGeU&feature=emb_logo (2020-09-23)

Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible. (2020-09-18)

Computational modelling explains why blues and greens are brightest colous in nature
Researchers have shown why intense, pure red colours in nature are mainly produced by pigments, instead of the structural colour that produces bright blue and green hues. (2020-09-11)

Development of photovoltaics that can be applied like paint for real-life application
Researchers in Korea have successfully developed a high-efficiency large-area organic solution processable solar cell by controlling the speed at which the solution of raw materials for solar cells became solidified after being coated. (2020-09-09)

Painting with light: Novel nanopillars precisely control intensity of transmitted light
By shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of tiny titanium dioxide pillars, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have reproduced with astonishing fidelity the luminous hues and subtle shadings of 'Girl With a Pearl Earring.' (2020-09-04)

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence
Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big cities and 42% more likely than suburban women. (2020-08-06)

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes. (2020-08-03)

Eyckian Lamb of God reveals her secrets
Two non-invasive chemical imaging modalities were employed to help understand the changes made over time to the Lamb of God, the focal point of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. Two major results were obtained: a prediction of the facial features of the Lamb of God that had been hidden beneath non-original overpaint dating from the 16th century (and later), and evidence for a smaller earlier version of the Lamb's body with a more naturalistic build. (2020-07-29)

What jigsaw puzzles tell us about child development
New research shows that children only learn to do jigsaw puzzles once they have reached a certain stage of development. Three-year-olds use trial and error, but four-year-olds are able to use information in the picture to complete the puzzles. The research team say this understanding is the foundation of learning to draw and paint. (2020-07-28)

Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'
Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products. UH researchers have discovered a chemical compound that stops listeria reproduction in both light and dark conditions which could lead to bacterial control in food products. (2020-07-27)

Older adults who can really smell the roses may face lower likelihood of dementia
Seniors who can identify smells like roses, turpentine, paint-thinner and lemons, and have retained their senses of hearing, vision and touch, may have half the risk of developing dementia as their peers with marked sensory decline. (2020-07-20)

Composing creativity: Children benefit from new painting materials
New research out of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) utilizes digital image analysis technology to shed light on some of the challenges children face when representing their imaginations through the medium of paint. The research also offers concrete insight into the development of children's psyches, and importantly, offers suggestions for educators to improve children's cognitive, spatial, and artistic abilities. (2020-07-16)

Microscopy technique reveals nanoscale detail of coatings as they dry
Thin film coatings do more than add color to walls. For example, they can be used as pharmaceutical devices. How these coatings dry can change their properties, which is especially important for films used in drug delivery. Lehigh University engineering researchers studying the in situ drying behavior of thin film coatings are visualizing particle interactions with groundbreaking precision. Their findings could impact the development of drug delivery technology. (2020-07-10)

UCLA-led team develops ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
A research team led by UCLA materials scientists has demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun. The advance shows practical pathways for designing paints that, if used on rooftops and other parts of a building, could significantly reduce cooling costs, beyond what standard white 'cool-roof' paints can achieve. (2020-07-08)

Bristol innovation challenges regular touchscreens with new spray-on technique
A team at Bristol has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape. Inspired by the way an artist creates graffiti on a wall and using a novel combination of sprayable electronics and 3D printing, the technique, called ProtoSpray, allows the creation of displays on surfaces that go beyond the usual rectangular and 2D shapes. (2020-06-24)

The origins of measles: Virus diverged from cattle-infecting relative earlier than thought in history
The measles virus diverged from a closely related cattle-infecting virus in approximately the sixth century BCE - around 1,400 years earlier than current estimates - according to a new study of dozens of measles genomes. (2020-06-18)

Carpet shell clams reveal high levels of pollution in several coastal lagoons in Tunisia
The clams with the greatest levels of heavy metals come from lagoons in which the water temperature is higher, according to a University of Cordoba study (2020-06-16)

Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction
Researchers have discovered that repurposed enzymes and light are key to producing chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion. By blending bio- and photocatalysis and experimenting with reactionary 'ingredients,' the CABBI team developed a visible-light-induced reaction using the enzyme family ene-reductase (ER). The substrates used in this study, alkenes, can be derived in principle from biomass fatty acids; the end products are valuable chiral carbonyl compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. (2020-06-08)

A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-04-28)

Global changes in insect populations reflect both decline and growth
The widely reported 'insect apocalypse' is far more nuanced than previous studies have suggested, according to a new study, which reports the findings of a meta-analysis featuring data from 166 long-term surveys across 1,676 sites worldwide. (2020-04-23)

NASA reports Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion hit record low in March
Ozone levels above the Arctic reached a record low for March, NASA researchers report. An analysis of satellite observations show that ozone levels reached their lowest point on March 12 at 205 Dobson units. While such low levels are rare, they are not unprecedented. Similar low ozone levels occurred in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, in 1997 and 2011. In comparison, the lowest March ozone value observed in the Arctic is usually around 240 Dobson units. (2020-04-16)

Study reveals secret of 18th-century portrait
Russian researchers and Russia's famed Tretyakov Gallery have conducted a comprehensive preconservation study of 'The Portrait of F.P. Makerovsky in a Masquerade Costume' (1789) by the Russian painter Dmitry Levitsky. (2020-03-19)

New study reveals the secret of magmatic rocks consisting of only one mineral
Geologists from Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, have come up with an original explanation of how nature may produce an intriguing class of magmatic rocks that are made up of only one type of mineral. (2020-03-02)

Cracks make historical paintings less vulnerable to environmental variations
Historical wood panel paintings with developed craquelure patterns -- networks of fine cracks in the paint- are significantly less vulnerable to environmental variations than previously assumed, according to a study in the open access journal Heritage Science. The findings offer a potential explanation as to why heavily cracked historical paintings remain stable in environments far from 'ideal' museum conditions. (2020-02-19)

Study points to better medical diagnosis through levitating human blood
New research from the UBC's Okanagan campus, Harvard Medical School and Michigan State University suggests that levitating human plasma may lead to faster, more reliable, portable and simpler disease detection. The researchers used a stream of electricity that acted like a magnet and separated protein from blood plasma. Plasma is the clear, liquid portion of blood that remains after red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and other cellular components are removed. (2020-02-19)

University of Notre Dame-developed home lead screening kits shown to be highly accurate
An inexpensive lead sample collection kit distributed to homes in St. Joseph County is comparable in accuracy and sensitivity to more costly in-home analysis, according to research published this month in the Journal of Environmental Research. (2020-02-13)

Stanford researchers conduct census of cell surface proteins
A new technique for systematically surveying proteins on the outer surface of cells, which act like molecular social cues to guide cell-cell interactions and assembly into tissues and organs. (2020-01-24)

Feel the force: new 'smart' polymer glows brighter when stretched
Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created a stress-detecting 'smart' polymer that shines brighter when stretched. Researchers hope to use the new polymer to measure the performance of synthetic polymers and track the wear and tear on materials used in engineering and construction industries. (2020-01-23)

Risk of lead exposure linked to decreased brain volume in adolescents
In a study using brain scans from nearly 10 thousand adolescents across the country, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles show that risk of lead exposure is associated with altered brain anatomy and cognitive deficits in children from low income families. (2020-01-13)

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