Current Paint News and Events | Page 2

Current Paint News and Events, Paint News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 14 | 544 Results
Understanding the adolescent brain
New research from University of Alberta neuroscientists shows that the brains of adolescents struggling with mental-health issues may be wired differently from those of their healthy peers. (2019-12-20)

A 'Jackalope' of an ancient spider fossil deemed a hoax, unmasked as a crayfish
A team from the University of Kansas used fluorescence microscopy to analyze the supposed spider and differentiate what parts of the specimen were fossilized organism, and which parts were potentially doctored. (2019-12-19)

Scientists use modern technology to understand how ochre paint was created in pictographs
Ochre was often used as a vivid red paint in ancient rock art known as pictographs. Despite its broad use throughout human history and a modern focus on how the artistic symbolism is interpreted, little research exists on the paint itself and how it was produced. Now, scientists are using electron microscopes to understand how ochre paint was created by hunter-gatherers in North America to produce rock art located at Babine Lake in British Columbia. (2019-11-19)

New danger for corals in warming oceans: Metal pollution
Metal copper from agricultural runoff and marine paint leaching from boat hulls poses an emerging threat to soft coral sea fans in the waters around Puerto Rico. (2019-11-19)

Spray painting fiber bandages onto wounds
Researchers at Montana Technological University have developed a portable electrospinning device with a confined electric field that can safely deposit bandages and drugs directly onto biological surfaces, using air to spray the fibers out onto the surface, like a can of spray paint. The device can be used to cover wounds and provide controlled drug release over time, and is described in the Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology B. (2019-11-12)

Movement and flow: Simulating complexity of fluids and strands in the virtual world
Simulating the physics behind the movement of liquids and how fluids -- thick or thin -- interact with other objects is a key problem in visual effects. A team of computer scientists are addressing this problem in computer graphics with a novel, multi-scale framework that realistically and precisely imitates the complex dynamics of strands interacting with so-called shear-dependent liquids, such as mud, oil paint, melted chocolate, or pasta sauce. (2019-10-31)

Scientists reveal the physics of Jackson Pollock's painting technique
A study finds that Pollock's 'drip' technique was geared to avoid a classic fluid mechanical instability. (2019-10-30)

New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects
Developed at Brown University, a new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there. (2019-10-16)

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed
Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT. (2019-10-11)

Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings 
Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. However, by the 18th century, most artists had abandoned the colors because of their tendency to darken with time. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Inorganic Chemistry have uncovered the chemistry behind the copper pigments' color change. (2019-10-02)

The toes of artists who paint with their feet can be mapped in their brains
A study of artists who paint with their feet shows that these individuals have finely tuned 'toe maps' in their brains, where each toe can be linked with an area of brain activity visualized via fMRI. Although humans have well-defined hand maps, this is the first time that similarly robust toe maps have been identified in people. The findings appear Sept. 10, 2019 in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-09-10)

Scientists explore aged paint in microscopic detail to inform preservation efforts
To learn more about the chemical processes in oil paints that can damage aging artwork, a team led by researchers at the National Gallery of Art and the National Institute of Standards and Technology conducted a range of studies that included 3D X-ray imaging of a paint sample at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source. (2019-08-29)

Synthesis of UV absorbers from cashew nut shell liquid
Researchers succeeded in using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a substitute for petroleum in organic synthesis. Their aim was the development of a sustainable synthesis of soluble organic UV filters. (2019-08-29)

Beetle scales hold secret to creating sustainable paint from recycled plastic, research shows
The structure of ultra-white beetle scales could hold the key to making bright-white sustainable paint using recycled plastic waste, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered. (2019-08-29)

Paradoxical Survival: Examining the Parrondo effect across biology
SUTD researchers study the pivotal role that Parrondo's paradox plays in the shaping of living systems and its potential identity as a universal principle underlying biological diversity and persistence. (2019-08-05)

Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-06-19)

Powerful lasers for fragile works of art
Protecting artworks from the effects of aging requires an understanding of the way materials alter over time. Professor Patrizio Antici of Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) has developed a new diagnostic and analytical method for use in cultural conservation, putting his scientific knowledge of lasers and particle accelerators to work for the art world. He describes the new method in an article published in the journal Science Advances. (2019-06-10)

Exposing modern forgers
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger used old materials. This verification process requires less than 200 micrograms of paint. (2019-06-04)

JAMA Pediatrics editorial: New lead testing recommendations inconclusive, but do not mean screening
An NYU pediatrician and researcher writes in JAMA Pediatrics that new recommendations on testing children for lead are inconclusive, but do not mean that we should abandon screening children for elevated lead levels. (2019-04-16)

Uncovering the secrets of ancient rock art using 'X-ray vision'
Prehistoric rock paintings are a source of fascination. Aside from their beauty, there's deep meaning in these strokes, which depict ancient rituals and important symbols. Scientists now describe use of 'X-ray vision' to gain brand-new insights about the layers of paint in rock art in Texas without needless damage. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-01)

University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences that spanned the full color range of the lice genus found on 300 bird species worldwide. (2019-03-05)

New shapes of laser beam 'sneak' through opaque media
Researchers have found a way to pre-treat a laser beam so that it enters opaque surfaces without dispersing -- like a headlight that's able to cut through heavy fog at full strength. The discovery from scientists at Yale University and the Missouri University of Science & Technology has potential applications for deep-tissue imaging and optogenetics, in which light is used to probe and manipulate cells in living tissue. (2019-03-04)

A new method for precision drug delivery: Painting
Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are one step closer to delivering precise amounts of medication to exact location, repurposing an existing imaging ''painting'' method. (2019-02-27)

Elevation matters when it comes to climate change, deforestation and species survival
A study examining the impact of deforestation on lizard communities in the Dominican Republic demonstrates differing outcomes at different elevations. In the lowlands, deforestation reduces the number of individuals, but not which species occur in an area. In the highlands, it's the opposite. When the forest is cut down at higher elevations, the newly created pastures become filled with species found in the warmer lowlands. But locally adapted mountain lizards cannot survive as temperature rises. (2019-02-25)

A peek at living room decor suggests how decorations vary around the world
People around the world paint their walls different colors, buy plants to spruce up their interiors and engage in a variety of other beautifying techniques to personalize their homes, which inspired a team of researchers to study about 50,000 living rooms across the globe. (2019-02-22)

Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings
A multidisciplinary team from Northwestern University and the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico has diagnosed the strange paint disease causing Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings to deteriorate. The micron-sized protrusions are metal soaps, resulting from a chemical reaction between the metal ions and fatty acids commonly used as binder in paints. (2019-02-16)

Maestro's techniques
Rembrandt van Rijn's paintings are renowned for their masterful representations of light and shadow and a characteristic plasticity generated by a technique called impasto. Now, scientists have analyzed impasto layers in some of Rembrandt's paintings, and the study, which is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reveals that the impasto unexpectedly contains a very rare lead mineral called plumbonacrite. This finding suggests that Rembrandt used a unique paint recipe. (2019-01-30)

Study: Climate change reshaping how heat moves around globe
The Earth's atmosphere and oceans play important roles in moving heat from one part of the world to another, and new research is illuminating how those patterns are changing in the face of climate change. (2019-01-28)

More than ruffled feathers: Mockingbirds show heightened aggression after lead exposure
Mockingbirds exposed to sub-lethal levels of lead in urban areas display significantly heightened aggression, said Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Tulane University. The team said their findings highlight the possibility that sub-lethal lead exposure may be common among other wildlife living in urban areas and more work is needed to better understand its full effects. Their study was published in Science of the Total Environment. (2019-01-23)

Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects
A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites. It is the first time researchers have successfully shown that body-painting has this effect. Among indigenous peoples who wear body-paint, the markings thus provide a certain protection against insect-borne diseases. (2019-01-17)

The secret to Rembrandt's impasto unveiled
Rembrandt van Rijn revolutionized painting with a 3D effect using his impasto technique, where thick paint makes a masterpiece protrude from the surface. Thanks to the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, Grenoble, France, three centuries later an international team of scientists led by the Materials Science and Engineering Department of the Delft University of Technology and the Rijksmuseum have found how he did it. The study is published in Angewandte Chemie. (2019-01-14)

Pine needles from Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners
Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield. (2018-12-27)

Feeling the pressure with universal tactile imaging
Osaka University researchers developed a universal tactile imaging technology for pressure distribution measurement using a coupled conductor pair. An image processing approach based on tomography was then used to relate the pressure distribution to the conductors' contact resistance. Mechatronics technology enabled development of flexible sensors using conventional conductive materials. These sensors undergo simple fabrication processes and enable measurements to be performed with high positional accuracy. Tactile imaging was demonstrated using sheet- and finger-type sensors. (2018-11-15)

Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
Princeton researchers explore methods of using carefully controlled droplets as a way to make soft, biomimetic structures. The trick comes in controlling the droplets, which form under competing influences like gravity and surface tension. A new study, published Oct. 26 in Nature Communications, explains how a deeper understanding of these highly dynamic forces can be harnessed to cheaply and quickly fabricate objects that normally require a more expensive and time-consuming process. (2018-11-08)

Tracking Aedes aegypti across the ages with vector genomics
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2018-10-31)

Next generation of watch springs
What happens when something keeps getting smaller and smaller? This is the type of question Empa researcher Johann Michler and his team are investigating. As a by-product of their research completely novel watch springs could soon be used in Swiss timepieces. (2018-10-30)

Do lizards dream like us?
Researchers from the CNRS, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, and Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals, and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on the bearded dragon and conducted the same sleep investigation on another lizard, the Argentine tegu. Their findings nevertheless point out differences between species, which raises new questions about the origin of sleep states. (2018-10-11)

Feeding ants dopamine might make them smarter foragers
In an ant colony, few tasks are as important as gathering food. But the desert heat can pose a challenge for an ant on foraging duty. Recent findings, publishing in the journal iScience on Sept. 27, show how dopamine may influence the behavior of ant foragers in the desert. (2018-09-27)

Keeping things cool with a paint-like polymer
Paving the way to alternatives to high-energy modes of cooling, like air conditioners, researchers now present a polymer that can cool down surfaces by reflecting sunlight and heat back into the sky. (2018-09-27)

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface
Know that sickening feeling when you find your car banged up by a runaway shopping cart? It may become just a bad memory if auto body manufacturers make use of a new suite of tests developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and three industry partners. Data from these tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defend itself against dings, dents, scratches and things that go bump on the highway. (2018-09-20)

Page 2 of 14 | 544 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.