Current Pandemic News and Events

Current Pandemic News and Events, Pandemic News Articles.
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Tool encoded in coronaviruses provides a potential target for COVID-19
Coronaviruses exploit our cells so they can make copies of themselves inside us. (2021-02-23)

More than 87,000 scientific papers on coronavirus since pandemic
Scientists from around the world have published more than 87,000 papers about coronavirus between the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and October 2020, a new analysis shows. Even given the importance of the pandemic, researchers were surprised by the huge number of studies and other papers that scientists produced on the subject in such a short time. (2021-02-23)

CDDEP report highlights tremendous burden from infectious diseases in SEAR countries
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India - Researchers at CDDEP, in collaboration with leading experts in the field, have produced the ''Infectious Diseases in the South-East Asia Region'' report, which examines cross-boundary challenges in communicable disease control in countries in the South-and South-East Asia region. The report emphasizes infectious diseases related to other sources of disease burden in the region and communicates overall trends in the health and economic burden they impose. (2021-02-23)

College students displaced from campus due to COVID-19 show worse psychological outcomes
In a new study of 791 undergraduate and graduate students, surveyed between April 9 and August 4, 2020, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston University's School of Social Work, and McLean Hospital revealed that students forced to relocate during the spring were more likely to report COVID-19-related grief, loneliness and generalized anxiety symptoms than students who did not relocate. (2021-02-23)

Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

Material hardship taking a mental and physical toll on young adults during pandemic
Material hardship, such as not being able to pay bills, negatively affects both physical and mental health. This research brief examines how different types of material hardship (difficulty paying for food, bills, and health care) are associated with self-rated health, depression, sleep problems, and suicidal thoughts among U.S. young adults (ages 24-32). (2021-02-22)

UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use - or lack thereof - prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementation of new services. (2021-02-22)

What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (2021-02-22)

Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

Ten lessons from the virus crisis
A mixture of smaller countries led by New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Cyprus, Rwanda and Iceland led the world 's Top 10 countries to manage their COVID-19 response well, according to a new study. In the study, published in The BMJ, lead researcher Flinders University's Professor Fran Baum joined experts from around the world to reflect upon the Global Health Security Index (October 2019) predictions for a public health emergency. (2021-02-21)

COVID-19 may have caused the loss of more than 20.5 million years of life worldwide
A study by a group researchers from several international universities and research centres, including lecturers from the UPF Department of Economics and Business, has estimated the premature mortality impact of covid-19. It has done so by calculating years of life lost (YLL) due to covid-19 compared to YLL for other common illnesses, such as the flu or cardiovascular diseases. (2021-02-19)

Innovative parenting programs address inequality in young children's development
Parent education programs and interventions that begin shortly after the birth of a child have shown to significantly impact parenting behaviors that support social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty, according to a study led by pediatricians and psychologists across the country, including NYU Grossman School of Medicine, NYU Steinhardt, and the University of Pittsburgh. (2021-02-19)

Data show lower daily temperatures lead to higher transmission of COVID-19
Understanding the impact of seasonal temperature changes on transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is an important factor in reducing the virus's spread in the years to come. Researchers compared daily low temperature data and logged cases of COVID-19 in 50 countries in the Northern Hemisphere between Jan. 22 and April 6, 2020. Their research, published this week in PLOS ONE, showed that as temperatures rose, the rate of new cases of COVID-19 decreased. (2021-02-19)

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students
New nationwide survey data uncovers college students' current mental health challenges and needs. (2021-02-19)

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills
Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average. (2021-02-18)

Climate change concern unaffected by pandemic, study shows
Covid-19 has not made people any less concerned about climate change - despite the pandemic disrupting and dominating many aspects of their lives, a study suggests. Over a period of 14 months - including the first three months of the Covid-19 lockdown - neither concern about climate change nor belief in the severity of the problem declined in the UK, the research found. (2021-02-18)

Pandemic got you down? A little nature could help
Researchers have long been aware of the positive impact of a connection with nature on psychological health and, according to a new study published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the pandemic hasn't decreased the power of nature to improve mental well-being. (2021-02-18)

COVID-19 in Africa is severely underestimated, finds Zambia study by Boston University
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study in Lusaka, Zambia's capital, challenges the common belief that Africa somehow 'dodged' the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings indicate that low numbers of reported infections and deaths across Africa may simply be from lack of testing, with the coronavirus taking a terrible but invisible toll on the continent. (2021-02-18)

Promoting and protecting human milk and breastfeeding during COVID-19
With stressors mounting daily on the health care system due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a de-prioritization of the childbearing family has been noted. Their care has changed, resulting in mothers forced to go through labor and birth without their partners, parents barred from NICU visitation, and discharge of mothers and newborns early without enough expert lactation care. (2021-02-18)

Internet trends suggest COVID-19 spurred a return to earlier values and activities
American values and attitudes have changed dramatically during COVID-19, report researchers, including UCLA Professor Patricia Greenfield, in a new study of online behavior that analyzed more than half a billion words and phrases posted on Twitter, blogs and internet forums. This may be the largest analysis of socio-cultural change, using behavioral data, ever conducted in psychology. (2021-02-18)

New report calls for universal coverage of long-term care for older adults in U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic's heavy toll on older Americans highlights the need to strengthen the nation's safety net for people in need of long-term services and supports, according to a new report published by Milbank Quarterly. The report proposes a system of universal coverage to support the long-term care of all older Americans. (2021-02-18)

New research finds drive-through mass-vaccination clinics could alter COVID-19 trajectory
Policymakers at all levels of government are racing to vaccinate hundreds of millions of people to save lives and blunt the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. New research published in the INFORMS Journal on Applied Analytics provides a simulated model for drive-through clinics that can be used for mass COVID-19 vaccinations based on the successful use of such a clinic to address H1N1. (2021-02-17)

Online tool helps estimate COVID's true toll on sub-Saharan Africa
Although early reporting portrayed sub-Saharan Africa as being largely spared from the coronavirus pandemic, an international team led by Princeton researchers reported that determining the true impact of the novel coronavirus in sub-Saharan Africa may be complicated by a tremendous variability in risk factors and obscured by surveillance challenges. The researchers developed an interactive online tool for estimating severe coronavirus infections per country based on the impact of various risk factors, such as chronic diseases and access to healthcare. (2021-02-17)

Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

Global poliovirus risk management and modeling
Launched in 1988, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) stands out as one of the largest, internationally coordinated global public health major projects conducted to date, with cumulative spending of over $16.5 billion for 1988-2018, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than 30 years later, stubborn outbreaks of wild poliovirus still occur in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where cases have been increasing since 2018. The global eradication of polio continues to be an elusive goal. (2021-02-16)

ASHP publishes reports exploring pharmacy's role in future of healthcare delivery
ASHP today announced the publication of two landmark reports that articulate a futuristic vision for pharmacy practice, including expanded roles for the pharmacy enterprise in healthcare organizations. The 2021 ASHP/ASHP Foundation Pharmacy Forecast Report and the Vizient Pharmacy Network High-Value Pharmacy Enterprise (HVPE) framework, published in AJHP, outline opportunities for pharmacy leaders to advance patient-centered care, population health, and the overall well-being of their organizations (2021-02-16)

Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt
A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies. (2021-02-16)

COVID-19 infection rates high in pregnant women
The study also showed that the number of COVID-19 infections in pregnant patients from nearly all communities of color in Washington was high. There was a twofold to fourfold higher prevalence of pregnant patients with COVID-19 infections from communities of color than expected based on the race-ethnicity distribution of pregnant women in Washington in 2018. (2021-02-16)

Partners' company helps us stay connected during pandemic
A pair of UCR studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found: not your kids, not kibitzing with your bestie on Facetime, and not your adorable-adoring pets. (2021-02-16)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

Almost half of virus sufferers report depression
Almost half of people testing positive for coronavirus have reported symptoms of depression, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. (2021-02-15)

New study of goals and beliefs during COVID-19 lockdown shows people still care
A new report has revealed how people's attitudes towards their beliefs and/or accomplishing their short and long-term goals changed amid the unexpected alteration and challenges of lockdown. (2021-02-15)

The impact of COVID-19 on motherhood
A new study explores the impact that the stress and isolation brought on by COVID-19 has had on people who were pregnant or gave birth during the pandemic. Many of those surveyed last summer reported additional stress brought on by disinformation in hospitals and lack of support with childcare and infant feeding. (2021-02-15)

Regional variation in the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed human behavior, and that has major consequences for data-gathering citizen-science projects such as eBird, run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. New research finds that when human behaviors change, so do the data. (2021-02-15)

Grasshoppers and roadblocks: Coping with COVID-19 in rural Mexico
On the outskirts of some small Indigenous communities in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, a few volunteer guards keep watch along roads blocked by makeshift barricades of chains, stones and wood. The invader they are trying to stop is COVID-19. For many of Mexico's Indigenous people, poor and ignored by state and federal governments, the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic is one that rests primarily with themselves. (2021-02-12)

Identifying risk factors for elevated anxiety in young adults during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study has identified early risk factors that predicted heightened anxiety in young adults during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The findings from the study, supported by the National Institutes of Health and published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, could help predict who is at greatest risk of developing anxiety during stressful life events in early adulthood and inform prevention and intervention efforts. (2021-02-12)

Protein sequences provide clues to how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells
Researchers at EMBL Heidelberg have identified sequences in human proteins that might be used by SARS-CoV-2 to infect cells. They have discovered that the virus might hijack certain cellular processes, and they discuss potentially relevant drugs for treating COVID-19. (2021-02-11)

- How we sleep and experience psychological symptoms during pandemic
A study shows that during the first confinement, day-to-day variations in subjective sleep quality influenced the occurrence of mental and physical health complaints, and that these effects were linked to daily reports of COVID-19 related deaths. The team of researchers led by Peter Simor interviewed 166 participants in three European countries, twice a day for two consecutive weeks via an online interface about their sleep quality and negative psychological experiences. (2021-02-11)

National trends in us otolaryngology surgical volume early in COVID-19 pandemic
Changes in otolaryngology surgical volumes in the United States early on in the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this study. (2021-02-11)

Researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability
Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. (2021-02-11)

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