Current Parasites News and Events

Current Parasites News and Events, Parasites News Articles.
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Parasites' dispersal capacity and rates of genetic introgression--a study
The results, recently published in the journal Communications Biology, have important applications in the field of coevolutionary biology (2021-02-19)

Magnetic attraction: Breakthrough test for malaria
After nearly a decade of research, a new test that detects the magnetic properties of malaria-infected blood could soon be used to help eliminate the mosquito-borne disease. (2021-02-18)

Could playing host to hookworms help prevent ageing?
Parasitic worms could hold the key to living longer and free of chronic disease, according to a review article published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2021-02-02)

Deeper insight into how tick spit suppresses cattle immunity
A tick saliva study reveals immune responses that could lead to better protection for cattle. (2021-01-28)

New malaria mosquito is emerging in African cities
Larvae of a new malaria mosquito species are abundantly present in water containers in cities in Ethiopia. The mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, is the main malaria mosquito in India but only appeared on the African continent a few years ago. It has now been found in cities and towns in urban settings in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti. Malaria can become an increasing problem for urban areas in Ethiopia and elsewhere in Africa. (2021-01-27)

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (2021-01-26)

Genetic sequence for parasitic flowering plant Sapria
A team of Harvard-led researchers presented the most complete genome yet assembled of one of the major Rafflesiaceae lineages, Sapria himalayana. (2021-01-22)

Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, Yale scientists say
In a paper published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, four Yale immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies -- the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods. (2021-01-14)

Wits University scientists artificially infect mosquitoes with human malaria to advance treatment
Scientists at the Wits Research Institute for Malaria (WRIM) in partnership with the University of Pretoria and colleagues in the US, Spain and Switzerland have identified novel antiplasmodial lead compounds for mass drug administration and vector control to eliminate malaria. (2021-01-14)

Bacteria carried by mosquitos may protect them against pesticides
Mosquitoes are transmitters of several diseases and pesticides are used to control their numbers in many countries. New study finds Wolbachia - a bacteria commonly found in insects - appears to protect them against these pesticides. (2021-01-13)

Bioenergetics: New features of ATP synthase
Structural studies of a mitochondrial ATP synthase illustrate the basis for the diversity of its membrane-shaping properties. (2021-01-08)

Multiple mosquito blood meals accelerate malaria transmission
Multiple bouts of blood feeding by mosquitoes shorten the incubation period for malaria parasites and increase malaria transmission potential, according to a study published Dec. 31 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Lauren Childs of Virginia Tech, Flaminia Catteruccia of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and colleagues. (2020-12-31)

Genetic engineering without unwanted side effects helps fight parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at UZH to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method is making it possible to develop a (harmless) experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii. (2020-12-23)

Study: Bumble bees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes -- characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat -- had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to research led by Penn State scientists. (2020-12-21)

Cell atlas of tropical disease parasite may hold key to new treatments
The first cell atlas of an important life stage of Schistosoma mansoni, a parasitic worm that poses a risk to hundreds of millions of people each year, has been developed by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. (2020-12-18)

Researchers identify the bacteria that can make the Bolson tortoise become ill
The Bolson tortoise is a species indigenous to the Chihuahua desert in Mexico and is endangered. This research could help with conservation strategies for this species. (2020-12-03)

Young asymptomatic 'super spreaders' keep malaria viable by infecting local mosquitoes
The new findings, reported today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), reveal a hidden reservoir that's a barrier to long-term efforts to eliminate malaria and an immediate threat for disease resurgence if control measures like bednets and indoor spraying falter. (2020-11-18)

Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe. (2020-11-17)

Infection by parasites disturbs flight behaviour in shoals of fish
Shoal behaviour in fish is an important strategy for them to safeguard their survival. Certain parasites are able to manipulate this strategy. Biologists have discovered that infected individual fish disturb the transmission of flight behaviour and, as a result, increase not only their own risk of being eaten, but also that of other - non-infected - members of the group. (2020-11-09)

When malaria parasites trick liver cells to let themselves in
A new study led by Maria Manuel Mota, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, now shows that malaria parasites secrete the protein EXP2 that is required for their entry into hepatocytes. These findings, published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications, open a new avenue for prophylactic anti-malarial strategies, since blocking or decreasing the infection of the liver can prevent the disease. (2020-11-06)

UC researchers pioneer more effective way to block malaria transmission in mosquitoes
Employing a strategy known as 'population modification,' which involves using a CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system to introduce genes preventing parasite transmission into mosquito chromosomes, University of California researchers have made a major advance in the use of genetic technologies to control the transmission of malaria parasites. (2020-11-03)

Stronger treatments could cure Chagas disease
Researchers in the University of Georgia's Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases have found that a more intensive, less frequent drug regimen with currently available therapeutics could cure the infection that causes Chagas disease (2020-10-29)

Exposure to suboptimal doses of antimalarial drugs could, under certain circumstances, increase mala
Exposure to suboptimal doses of the antiparasitic drug artemisinin could increase the sexual conversion rate of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, thereby increasing the probability of transmission, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. The findings, published in eLife, may have public health implications, particularly in the context of mass antimalarial drug administration campaigns. (2020-10-28)

Study reveals differences in malaria clearance between males and females
Females are able to clear asymptomatic malaria infections at a faster rate than their male counterparts, says a study published today in eLife. (2020-10-27)

How deadly parasites 'glide' into human cells
A group of scientists led by EMBL Hamburg's Christian Löw provide insights into the molecular structure of proteins involved in the gliding movements through which the parasites causing malaria and toxoplasmosis invade human cells. (2020-10-13)

Scientists shed new light on mechanisms of malaria parasite motility
New insight on the molecular mechanisms that allow malaria parasites to move and spread disease within their hosts has been published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2020-10-13)

Building 'ToxAll' -- a smart, self-assembling nano-vaccine to prevent toxoplasmosis
A team of researchers at the University of Chicago are developing a toolbox of self-assembling nanoparticles to be used as vaccines against infections including the parasitic Toxoplasma gondii. (2020-10-13)

Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world -- and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. The research, led by Vanessa Ezenwa, a professor of ecology at the University of Georgia, and funded by the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how parasites can cause animals to produce more methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. (2020-10-07)

How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
The parasites that cause 200 million cases of malaria each year can withstand feverish temperatures that make their human hosts miserable. Now, a Duke University-led team is beginning to understand how they do it. The researchers have identified a lipid-protein combo that springs into action to gird the parasite's innards against heat shock. Understanding how malaria protects its cells against heat and other onslaughts could lead to new ways to fight tough-to-kill strains, researchers say. (2020-10-05)

Something old, something new combine for effective vaccine against parasitic skin disease
Scientists are planning for Phase 1 human trials of a vaccine they developed by using CRISPR gene-editing technology to mutate the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, a skin disease common in tropical regions of the world and gaining ground in the United States. (2020-09-24)

How Dantu Blood Group protects against malaria - and how all humans could benefit
The secret of how the Dantu genetic blood variant helps to protect against malaria has been revealed for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenya. The team found that red blood cells in people with the rare Dantu blood variant have a higher surface tension that prevents them from being invaded by the world's deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. (2020-09-16)

Pandemics and epidemics could exacerbate racism xenophobia
Human beings share these same biological impulses as other animals to separate into modular social groups. However, when pathogens are spreading, humans tend to also adopt behaviors that are ''hyper vigilant and particularly error prone,'' against those with different phenotypes. (2020-09-16)

Massively parallel sequencing unlocks cryptic diversity of eye parasites in fish
Scientists developed a methodology that uses next-generation sequencing technology for fast and efficient screening of genetic diversity of fish eye parasites. (2020-09-07)

Dodder uses the flowering signal of its host plant to flower
Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have investigated how the parasitic dodder Cuscuta australis controls flower formation. They showed that the parasite eavesdrops on the flowering signals of its host plants in order to activate its own flowering machinery. By synchronizing flowering with its host plant, the parasite makes sure that it can grow on its host long enough to produce the optimal amount of seeds. (2020-08-31)

In times of ecological uncertainty, brood parasites hedge their bets
Some birds lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species and let the host parents raise their young. A new study finds that in times of environmental flux, these brood parasites 'diversify their portfolios,' minimizing the risks of their unorthodox lifestyle by increasing the number and variety of hosts they select as adoptive parents. (2020-08-21)

Meet hedge fund managers of avian world
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that brood parasites living in more variable and unpredictable habitats tend to parasitize -- or squat and drop their eggs in -- the nests of a greater variety and number of hosts. The study is published Aug. 21 in Nature Communications. (2020-08-21)

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (2020-08-18)

Why aren't sea trout thriving anymore?
Sea trout numbers are declining in Norway and scientists don't know why. They have studied the trout in two fjord systems in northern Norway's Nordland county. The next step is to look at fish populations along the entire coastline. (2020-08-17)

Malaria discovery could expedite antiviral treatment for COVID-19
New research into malaria suggests targeting enzymes from the human host, rather than from the pathogen itself, could offer effective treatment for a range of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. (2020-08-11)

Biodiversity may limit invasions: Lessons from lizards on Panama Canal islands
Introduced species can become invasive, damaging ecosystems and disrupting economies through explosive population growth. One mechanism underlying population expansion in invasive populations is 'enemy release', whereby the invader experiences relaxation of agonistic interactions with other species, including parasites. (2020-08-09)

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