Current Participation News and Events

Current Participation News and Events, Participation News Articles.
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Communal activities boost rehabilitation for older adults in long term care
A group of researchers has developed a new program showing participation and activity is critical for the rehabilitation of older adults in long-term care. (2021-02-19)

Basque ethnic identity and collective empowerment are associated with wellbeing
A member of the Culture, Cognition and Emotion research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque country has explored how social identification with Basque speakers and collective psychological empowerment relate to personal and social wellbeing and community participation. Individuals who experience a high degree of identification with Basque speakers and a high degree of empowerment have been seen to display higher indices of wellbeing. (2021-02-19)

If healthy people are purposefully infected with COVID-19 for the sake of science, they should be paid
Multidisciplinary team of international experts suggests participants should receive a ''substantial'' amount, be paid ethically. (2021-02-05)

What impact did police violence have on participation in the October 1, 2020 referendum?
An academic study by professors Toni Rodon (UPF) and Marc Guinjoan (UB) demonstrates that violence decreased participation at the places where it occurred, but increased participation in surrounding municipalities. Part of this increased participation is accounted for by people with a dual sense of national identity who had not planned to vote but did so as a sign of protest or civil disobedience. (2021-02-02)

Sport participation levels lower in students from lower socio-economic groups
Students from lower socio-economic groups (SEG) are less likely to participate in sport or physical activity at university, research from Sheffield Hallam University has found. (2021-02-01)

Youth with autism see sharp decline in physical activity between ages 9-13
A recent study from Oregon State University has found that to best help kids with autism maintain healthy rates of physical activity, interventions should be targeted during the ages of 9 to 13, as that's when kids show the biggest drop in active time. (2021-02-01)

Sport may fast-track numeracy skills for Indigenous children
Greater sports participation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is linked with better academic performance, according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2021-01-25)

Chimpanzee friends fight together to battle rivals
Humans cooperate with each other in large groups to defend territories or wage war. But what underlies the evolution of this kind of cooperation? Researchers at the Max PIanck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Harvard University show that there may be a link between social bonds and participation in large-scale cooperation: Chimpanzees join their close bond partners when fighting rivals. In humans, too, social bonds may have been essential to the evolution of cooperative abilities. (2021-01-22)

Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras
University researchers surveyed the 312 students found that while some students had concerns about the lack of privacy or their home environment, 41% of the 276 respondents cited their appearance, as their reason not to switch on their cameras on zoom. (2021-01-19)

College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a Dartmouth study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language. The findings are published in Gender & Society. (2021-01-18)

What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19-related closures?
As schools across the United States are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia (DC), five US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education (BIE). (2020-12-08)

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-12-07)

Football-loving states slow to enact youth concussion laws
States with college teams in strong conferences, in particular the Southeastern Conference (SEC), were among the last to take up regulations on youth concussions, according to a recent study. The study, which investigated the association between youth sport participation and passage of concussion legislation, also found a similar connection in states with high rates of high school football participation. In contrast, states with higher gender equality were early adopters. (2020-12-01)

Analysis of the relations between Spanish civil society organizations and science
Researchers at UPF have analysed the relationship between civil society organizations and the Spanish science and technology system. The study has been published in Public Understanding of Science and conducted by Carolina Llorente and Gema Revuelta, at the Science, Communication and Society Studies Centre (CCS-UPF), and Mar Carrió, of the Health Sciences Educational Research Group (GRECS). (2020-11-19)

US nephrology fellows' perceptions on home dialysis training
This study assessed nephrology fellows' confidence and clinical experience with these therapies near the completion of their training. Researchers surveyed trainee attendees of 3 separate home dialysis-focused conferences. Overall, perceived preparedness was moderate for peritoneal dialysis and low for home hemodialysis. The majority reported participation in a continuity clinic and other home dialysis education, but nearly all desired more focused teaching on PD and HHD. This study suggests that redesign of nephrology fellowship training in home dialysis is warranted. (2020-11-16)

Researchers study strength-training gender gap, possible solutions
Strength training is an important part of any exercise routine, but some women may not be getting the recommended hours. New Penn State research discovered some of the barriers preventing women from strength training, as well as some solutions to overcoming those obstacles. (2020-11-05)

Early big-game hunters of the americas were female, researchers suggest
For centuries, historians and scientists mostly agreed that when early human groups sought food, men hunted and women gathered. Not so, say researchers. (2020-11-04)

Study raises questions about role of leisure activity in dementia
Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

Justice for all: How race and American identity may affect politics
New Penn State research examined whether feeling like you belong in America -- or not -- affected how members of different races and ethnicities participated in politics. (2020-10-16)

A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. Now new research shows that parents' participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out. (2020-10-06)

Theater improvisation techniques show promising results for science classroom engagement
A researcher at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed a unique method to improve class participation in a graduate-level thermodynamics course by incorporating theater improvisation activities in the classroom. (2020-09-25)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

Women hold prominent roles, publish more in 'open science' vs. 'reproducibility' model
An international group of researchers examined the two paths that scientists are following to improve science: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. They have very distinct cultures, with two distinct literatures produced by two groups of researchers with little crossover. Their investigation also suggests that one of the movements -- open science -- promotes greater equity, diversity, and inclusivity. (2020-09-16)

NSAIDs not associated with more severe coronavirus disease, study finds
The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and diclofenac, is not associated with any adverse effects in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a new study published September 8 in PLOS Medicine by Anton Pottegård of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues from Aarhus University Hospital and the Danish Medicines Agency. (2020-09-08)

Finnish children get to participate in the evaluation of their early childhood education and care
Finnish children have a very positive attitude towards early childhood education and care (ECEC), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Early Child Development and Care this August, the study explored children's negative experiences of early childhood education and care. The researchers have published an article on children's positive experiences already earlier. (2020-08-25)

UIC study examines high schoolers' accuracy in classification of their peers
A study led by UIC's Rachel Gordon examines the accuracy of adolescent peer group classifications based on similar values, behaviors, and interests. (2020-08-17)

Obesity linked to social ties in older women, more so than in men
Women who lack social ties have a greater likelihood of being obese, according to new UBC research published today in PLOS One. Men, on the other hand, were less likely to be obese if they lived alone and had a smaller social network. (2020-07-30)

Towards prosperous public goods with freedom of choice
An experimental game reveals that having the freedom to choose preferred public goods greatly increases their value by motivating more, and better, provisioning. (2020-07-14)

Participants in CPC+ are diverse but not representative of all primary care practices
This study analyzes patterns of participation in the Comprehensive Primary Care Plus initiative which is the largest voluntary primary care payment and delivery reform model tested to date. (2020-07-14)

SNAP work requirements put low-income Americans at risk
When work requirements for a federal food safety-net program start again, many low-income Americans will lose benefits -- and Black adults will be hardest hit, according to a study published today. In addition, some disabled people will lose these crucial food assistance benefits. (2020-06-26)

Study confirms the importance of informal learning in hospitals
The coronavirus crisis has shaken the structure of the Spanish healthcare system, leaving staff backed into a corner in their fight to beat the infection. However, doctors, nurses and other hospital and healthcare workers around the country have managed to acquire essential knowledge and adapt to these extraordinary circumstances in a matter of days. Plus, they've done it without attending courses or conferences; nothing but old-fashioned cooperation, according a research with the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC). (2020-06-10)

Sex differences in participation in large-scale genetic studies may affect results
An international group of researchers have found differences in the characteristics that drive men and women to participate in genome-wide association studies, which analyse genetic variants in different individuals to see if any are associated with a trait or disease. Millions of participants are involved. This means that researchers can see smaller and smaller effects increasing the number of genes they can link to a disease or trait, but these large numbers also mean that biases can affect results. (2020-06-07)

Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found. (2020-06-01)

Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports. Additionally, the study provided information about the importance of temperament traits for motor skills. (2020-05-27)

Domestic coastal and marine tourism could contribute to rebooting activity in the sect
NUI Galway's Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU) has released a report that presents estimates of the value of domestic coastal and marine tourism in the Republic of Ireland. (2020-05-21)

Electrocardiogram shows value in college athletes' screens
Research published today indicates that screenings that incorporate an ECG are more effective at detecting cardiac conditions that put athletes at risk, and more efficient in terms of cost-per-diagnosis of at-risk players, than screenings involving only a physical exam and patient history. (2020-05-04)

Strenuous exercise safe for people at high risk of knee arthritis
People at high risk for knee osteoarthritis (OA) may be reluctant to participate in strenuous physical activities such as jogging, cycling, singles tennis and skiing. But a new study that followed high-risk individuals for 10 years showed vigorous exercise did not increase their risk of developing OA and may even protect them from it. (2020-05-04)

COVID-19 limitations unique opportunity for researchers to decrease digital divide
The COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders and other limitations could offer researchers the chance to use technology to decrease the digital divide and disparities in academic research. (2020-04-29)

Culturally adapted materials boost Latino participation in diabetes education programs
An Oregon State University study published last week found that diabetes education programs that are linguistically and culturally tailored to Latinos lead to significantly higher rates of completion among Latino participants -- even higher than rates among non-Latinos enrolled in the English versions of those programs. (2020-03-25)

Can migration, workforce participation, and education balance the cost of aging in Europe?
New IIASA research shows that higher levels of education and increasing workforce participation in both migrant and local populations are needed to compensate for the negative economic impacts of aging populations in EU countries. (2020-03-23)

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