Current Partners News and Events

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Timing and intensity of oral sex may affect risk of oropharyngeal cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) can infect the mouth and throat to cause cancers of the oropharynx. A new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, has found that having more than 10 prior oral sex partners was associated with a 4.3-times greater likelihood of having HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. (2021-01-11)

Young adults say porn is their most helpful source of information about how to have sex
Young adults ages 18-24 years old in the U.S. say that porn is their most helpful source of information about how to have sex, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. (2021-01-06)

Cooperation with R&D organizations is significantly distinctive for advanced innovators
The innovation performance of firms depends on their ability to innovate in cooperation with external partners. In a study, HSE researchers found that most of innovation in Russian manufacturing happens in a sort of open processes, but extensive cooperation networks are barely detectable. The study was published in the December issue of Foresight and STI Governance. (2020-12-23)

Monkey see others, monkey do: How the brain allows actions based on social cues
Researchers at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan have shown that when monkeys make decisions based on social cues provided by other monkeys, information flow from one part of the brain (the ventral premotor cortex) to another (medial prefrontal cortex) is vital. When this neuronal pathway is silenced temporarily, monkeys cannot catch the social cues and end up behaving like autistic monkeys. (2020-11-02)

Explaining teamwork in male lions
Biologists from the Wildlife Institute of India and the University of Minnesota demonstrated the hows and whys of cooperation among male lions. (2020-10-16)

Safe sex or risky romance? Young adults make the rational choice
Eros, the fabled Greek god of love, was said to bring confusion and weaken the mind. New research, however, suggests that young adults are instead quite rational when it comes to selecting potential sexual partners. (2020-10-16)

Post-traumatic stress experienced by partners following miscarriage
One in 12 partners experience post-traumatic stress after miscarriage, suggests a new study. The research, led by Imperial College London, surveyed over 100 couples who had experienced early stage pregnancy loss (miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy before 12 weeks). (2020-10-09)

Prior abortion does not negatively affect feelings of parental competence
A recent study found that a prior induced abortion did not negatively impact a woman's psychological well-being or her thoughts about her competence as a parent when she later became a mother. (2020-09-23)

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

Psychological abuse: obstetric care must delve deeper
As domestic violence skyrockets amid COVID-19, women's health experts are calling for compulsory training of obstetric health practitioners to ensure they can recognise the signs of coercive control for women in their care. (2020-09-04)

Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia -- and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new University of Michigan study found. (2020-09-02)

Spouses shed more pounds together than alone
Weight loss is most successful in heart attack survivors when partners join in the effort to diet, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-27)

Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
The female reproductive tract has the final say in human mate choice, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. (2020-08-19)

Penis microbiota predicts if a man's female partner will develop bacterial vaginosis
Penile microbiome composition can vary; however, the presence of some bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria correlates with bacterial vaginosis onset in their female partners. Results highlight 10 bacteria that could be used to accurately predict bacterial vaginosis incidence in women. The study suggests that treatment manipulating the penile microbiome may reduce BV incidence in sex partners. (2020-08-04)

Partnerships with bankrupt companies could be double-edged sword for investors
New research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that when a company is in bankruptcy, its advertising and research and development investments can cut both ways. They increase the odds of surviving for some bankrupt companies and decrease the odds for others. (2020-07-30)

How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. However, this kind of cooperation contradicts the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin: Why would organisms invest valuable resources to help others? Instead, they should rather use them for themselves, in order to win the evolutionary competition with other species. A new study led by Christian Kost from the University of Osnabrück now solved this puzzle. (2020-07-23)

Living with a problem gambler?
With the lure of online gambling high during COVID-19 lockdowns - and some gambling venues now reopening - partners and families of problem gamblers may be the first to see a problem emerging. Many problem gamblers do not acknowledge their addiction and do not seek help - and that's when people close to them need support to cope, and potentially even help turn the situation around by motivating a partner to seek help. (2020-07-21)

Do we know what we want in a romantic partner? No more than a random stranger would
New research coming out of the University of California, Davis, suggests that people's ideal partner preferences do not reflect any unique personal insight (2020-07-06)

Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar
As the numbers of new claims for Universal Credit reach three million, in the context of COVID-19, a new report reveals the complex issues couples experience with this new benefit. (2020-06-22)

UTEP professor collaborates on LGBTQ+ COVID-19 Texas study
Preliminary results from this first-of-its-kind survey found that gender diverse people and queer people of color are experiencing a number of disparities. They include higher rates of COVID-19, more difficulty accessing a variety of services, and higher rates of anxiety and depression, as well as high unemployment compared with white participants. (2020-06-22)

Changes in frequency of sex among US adults
This survey study of US adults ages 18 to 44 looked at changes in the reported frequency of sexual activity, the number of sexual partners and factors associated with frequency and numbers of partners. (2020-06-12)

Use of emergency contraceptive pills among Scandinavian women
Use of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) is common among Scandinavian women, with one-third having used them at least once, according to a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. (2020-05-06)

How race affects listening during political conversations
A new study offers a rare look at how black and white people listen to each other during political discussions, including those that touch on controversial issues about race. (2020-05-05)

Digital solutions for dementia care
Telehealth delivery of dementia care in the home can be as effective as face-to-face home visit services if carers and recipients take advantage of the technologies available, Australian researchers say. The study of 63 people living with mild to moderate dementia, and their care partners, found that telehealth services using videoconferences can save travel time - particularly in rural and remote areas - and equip families with strategies to promote independence in the person with dementia. (2020-04-23)

PTSD partners feel invisible, study finds
Recognition of the needs of wives and intimate partners in supporting the recovery of veterans and front-line emergency workers affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been highlighted in a new study led by Flinders University. Their contribution to trauma recovery, and their own need for support, are not well understood by military and emergency service organisations, healthcare providers and government, the researchers found when they interviewed 22 partners of Australian veterans, paramedics, fire and police officers (2020-04-23)

Support communities key for military wives and partners facing employment and social challenges
Military spouses can struggle to find and maintain employment and face severe restrictions on their social lives because of their partners' working patterns. (2020-03-06)

How your romantic attachment style affects your finances, well-being
Attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance can both have negative consequences for well-being due, at least in part, to financial reasons, University of Arizona researchers found. (2020-02-25)

Social networks reveal dating in blue tits
Blue tits that are already associated in winter are more likely to have young together in the spring. (2020-02-20)

NCRI data shows increase in cancer research funding following five years of growth
Analysis of the NCRI's 18 partner organizations shows that cancer research funders in the UK have increased their collective spend, for the first time spending over £700 million in the year 2018/19. This follows five years of spending increases and the highest level of funding since NCRI started collecting data in 2002. (2020-02-04)

Fungi as food source for plants
The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed. This was discovered by researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Copenhagen through isotope investigations on Paris quadrifolia, otherwise known as Herb Paris or True Lover's Knot. In 'The New Phytologist' journal, the scientists report on their surprising results. (2020-01-29)

Study challenges assumptions about social interaction difficulties in autism
Results from researchers at UT Dallas suggest that successful social interactions for autistic adults revolve around partner compatibility and not just the skill set of either person. 'If autistic people were inherently poor at social interaction, you'd expect an interaction between two autistic people to be even more of a struggle than between an autistic and non-autistic person,' Dr. Noah Sasson said. 'But that's not what we found.' (2020-01-29)

Relation between physical violence and not having adequate check-ups during pregnancy
An international study led by the University of Granada has found that 9.8% of pregnant women in Andalusia fail to have sufficient check-ups during pregnancy -- that is, the number of hospital antenatal appointments they attend is lower than recommended. (2020-01-08)

Close friends help macaques survive
Close friendships improve the survival chances of rhesus macaques, new research shows. (2019-12-10)

Caring for family is what motivates people worldwide
A study of more than 7,000 people from 27 countries, led by scientists in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, has found that what motivates people the most is caring for their family. For 40 years researchers have focused on romantic and sexual partners, but these motivations were rated as a relatively low priority for most study participants, most of the time. Caring for family members was associated with well-being, and seeking romantic partners was associated with unhappiness. (2019-11-26)

Women raised in poor neighborhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology. (2019-11-21)

Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. If those samples are not available in one place, research institutions can support each other. This is the rationale behind ManyPrimates, a project that aims to establish a culture of global collaboration in primate cognition research. It was set up by researchers from the Leipzig Research Center for Early Childhood Development (LFE) at Leipzig University, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and Zoo Leipzig. (2019-10-29)

Polyamorous families face stigma during pregnancy and birth
Polyamorous families experience marginalization during pregnancy and birth, but with open, nonjudgmental attitudes from health care providers and changes to hospital policies, this can be reduced, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-15)

Depression and binge-drinking more common among military partners
New research from King's College London suggests that depression and binge-drinking are more common among the female partners of UK military personnel than among comparable women outside the military community. (2019-09-23)

Gender identity conversion efforts associated with adverse mental health outcomes
Gender identity conversion efforts to try to change a person's gender identity to match their sex assigned at birth were associated with increased likelihood of adverse mental health outcomes, including suicide attempts, in this study of nearly 28,000 transgender adults from across the United States. Professional organizations, including the American Psychiatric Association, have called conversion therapy for gender identity unethical and ineffective, and some states have outlawed the practice. (2019-09-11)

Do single people suffer more?
Researchers at the University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall, Austria) and the University of the Balearic Islands (Palma de Mallorca, Spain) have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support - even without verbal or physical contact. (2019-08-23)

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