Current Pathology News and Events

Current Pathology News and Events, Pathology News Articles.
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Beta blockers can repair malformed blood vessels in the brain
Propranolol, a drug that is efficacious against infantile haemangiomas (''strawberry naevi'', resembling birthmarks), can also be used to treat cerebral cavernous malformations, a condition characterised by misshapen blood vessels in the brain and elsewhere. This has been shown by researchers at Uppsala University in a new study published in the scientific journal Stroke. (2021-02-23)

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults. (2021-01-25)

Novel effector biology research provides insights into devastating citrus greening disease
Ma and her colleagues at the University of California and the University of Florida used molecular plant pathology approaches to dissect the mechanisms of the ongoing tug-of-war between the citrus host and the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus greening disease. (2021-01-21)

New study: available drugs can prevent rejection and tissue injury after transplantation
Controlling inflammation after transplantation of organs, cells, or tissues is critical for graft survival; however, it can be difficult. Continuing injuries due to chronic rejection can be particularly problematic. Now, a team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine report that neutralizing the cell signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), can prevent cascades of injurious molecules and signals after cell transplantation in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2020-12-21)

Uniquely human gene may drive numerous cancers
A new study published in FASEB BioAdvances reveals a human-specific connection between advanced carcinomas and a gene called SIGLEC12. (2020-12-09)

Reductive stress in neuroblastoma cells aggregates protein and impairs neurogenesis
Cells require a balance among oxidation-reduction reactions, or redox homeostasis. Loss of that balance to create oxidative stress is often associated with neurodegeneration. Less is known about how loss of that balance at the other end of the spectrum -- reductive stress -- may affect neurons. Now researchers show for the first time that reductive stress promotes protein aggregation in neuroblastoma cells and impairs neurogenesis. (2020-12-08)

Novel form of Alzheimer's protein found in spinal fluid indicates stage of the disease
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a novel form of the Alzheimer's protein tau in the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. This form of tau -- known as MTBR tau -- indicates what stage of Alzheimer's a person is in and tracks with tangles of tau protein in the brain. (2020-12-07)

Prostate cancer: CRYM protein inhibits tumour growth
Prostate cancer is caused by elevated hormone levels, and tumours are generally treated using hormone therapy. A research team headed by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna in collaboration with David Heery from the University of Nottingham/UK and Sarka Pospisilova and Suzanne Turner of the University of Brno/Czech Republic have shown that the protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) plays a significant part in tumour growth. The higher the levels of this protein that are present, the better the prognosis. (2020-11-18)

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). (2020-11-17)

Trial targets deadly lung cancer
With more than 650 Australians diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma last year, Flinders University is leading new research to discover alternatives to chemotherapy and even prevent deaths by early detection in future. One novel approach, using natural therapeutic benefits of curcumin, a key component of the spice turmeric, will be put to the test in a clinical trial in 2021 as part of world-leading research at Flinders University. (2020-10-30)

Study shows myocarditis linked to COVID-19 not as common as believed
A study conducted by Richard Vander Heide, MD, PhD, Professor and Director of Pathology Research at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Marc Halushka, MD, PhD, Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, suggests myocarditis caused by COVID-19 may be a relatively rare occurrence. (2020-10-29)

New cancer diagnostics: A glimpse into the tumor in 3D
A new technique could initiate a revolution in pathology: Tumor tissue is made transparent and illuminated with a special ultramicroscope. This makes it possible to analyze all the tissue removed in 3D without the need for slicing up the tumor. That way, the reliability of the diagnosis can be significantly increased. (2020-10-27)

Aging alone does not explain kidney pathology
Histopathology in non-neoplastic kidney tissue from 1,347 nephrectomy specimens showed very limited histopathologic changes in subset of older individuals. (2020-10-21)

Blood tests could be developed to help predict pregnancy complications new study suggests
UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. Their preliminary study, appearing in Epigenetics, links certain cell-free DNA signatures to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes. (2020-10-13)

Novel digital dashboard improves cancer case review efficiency
Researchers at the MU School of Medicine partnered with Roche Diagnostics to evaluate a cloud-based product called NAVIFY® Tumor Board that integrates all relevant clinical data for a tumor board into a single digital dashboard accessible to everyone. During a 16-month clinical study of the dashboard, researchers found NAVIFY Tumor Board significantly reduced the amount of time doctors and nurses across multiple specialties spent preparing for tumor board meetings. (2020-10-08)

Early COVID-19 cases in Southern California linked to New York
Most COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients in Southern California during the early months of the pandemic appear to have been infected by a variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus introduced to the region from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (2020-10-07)

Excess folic acid during pregnancy harms brain development of mice
A study of pregnant mice found high levels of folic acid were associated with significant changes in brain development of offspring. (2020-10-05)

A putative mechanism that switches brain pathology from anxiety to depression discovered
In experiments on mice, putative mechanisms for switching brain pathology from a state of experimental anxiety to depression have been discovered by the international team of researchers led by scientists from St Petersburg University (Russia). In the long term, this discovery could make it possible to create new, more effective drugs for mental disorders in humans. (2020-10-02)

Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply. Around 95 percent of food comes from conventional agriculture, which uses chemical pesticides to keep crops healthy. Increasingly, organic pesticides are sought as an alternative. Some organic pesticides contain live spores of the fungus Trichoderma to suppress other pathogens. Researchers at Göttingen University found one Trichoderma species can cause severe rot in cobs of maize (corn). Results were published in Frontiers in Agronomy. (2020-09-30)

MarrowQuant: A new digital-pathology tool
EPFL scientists have developed a digital pathology tool for quantifying bone marrow compartments in standard histological sections. Named 'MarrowQuant', the software makes it possible to examine bone marrow biopsies as well as to re-examine historical collections of bone-marrow samples and even old clinical trials. (2020-09-28)

Sanders-brown research discovers new pathway in TDP-43 related dementias
Recent work published by researchers at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) highlights what the lead investigator calls the ''cornerstone'' of her lab. Maj-Linda Selenica, assistant professor at SBCoA, led the study recently published in BBA Molecular Basis of Disease. She says their approach was unconventional as it looked at the molecular mechanisms implicated in TDP-43 biology, which is the focus of her lab. (2020-09-23)

After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid detection of infectious diseases. (2020-09-18)

new alteration in the brain of people with Alzheimer's discovered
New research led by Spanish scientists suggest that the altered glycosylation could determine that the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is processed by the amyloidogenic (pathological) pathway, giving rise to the production of the beta-amyloid, a small protein with a tendency to cluster forming the amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-09-18)

Brain astrocytes show metabolic alterations in Parkinson's disease
A new study using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology links astrocyte dysfunction to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology. The study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland and published in Scientific Reports highlights the role of brain astrocyte cells in PD pathology and the potential of iPSC-derived cells in disease modelling and drug discovery. (2020-09-07)

Toxicity of dorsal root ganglia is widely associated with CNS AAV gene therapy
A meta-analysis of non-human primate (NHP) studies showed that adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy often caused dorsal root ganglion (DRG) pathology. There were no clinical effects. (2020-09-02)

Researchers pursue 'hidden pathology' to explain fatigue in multiple sclerosis
In a study published in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital used positron emission technology (PET) imaging to look for brain's immune cells that may become erroneously activated in MS, leading to fatigue. The team describes a potential link to brain inflammation that may help explain the connection between MS and fatigue. (2020-08-26)

New links found between diabetes blood markers and Alzheimer's disease pathology
A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease provides insight into the association of blood markers of diabetes with brain beta-amyloid accumulation among older people at risk of dementia. The results suggest a link between Alzheimer's pathology, lower levels of insulin and lower insulin resistance. (2020-08-18)

Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
A preliminary analysis of an ongoing study of more than 300 COVID-19 patients treated with convalescent plasma therapy at Houston Methodist suggests the treatment is safe and effective. The results, published in The American Journal of Pathology, represent one of the first peer-reviewed publications in the country assessing efficacy of convalescent plasma and offer valuable scientific evidence that transfusing critically ill COVID-19 patients with high antibody plasma early in their illness reduced the mortality rate. (2020-08-12)

McKee CTE staging scheme accurate in diagnosing severity, location of disease
Since 2008, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and VA Boston Healthcare System have studied Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive brain disease associated with repetitive head impacts that has been diagnosed after death in the brains of American football players and other contact sport athletes as well as members of the armed services (2020-08-10)

LSU health pathologists publish first report on likely MIS involving the heart
A team of LSU Health New Orleans pathologists published what is believed to be the first case report on pathologic findings of vasculitis of the small vessels of the heart, which likely represents multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS). (2020-07-30)

Autopsies reveal surprising cardiac changes in COVID-19 patients
A series of autopsies conducted by LSU Health New Orleans pathologists shows the damage to the hearts of COVID-19 patients is not the expected typical inflammation of the heart muscle associated with myocarditis, but rather a unique pattern of cell death in scattered individual heart muscle cells. (2020-07-21)

Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests
A UCLA-led study has found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears -- often simultaneously -- when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern. (2020-07-17)

Timing key in understanding plant microbiomes
Oregon State University researchers have made a key advance in understanding how timing impacts the way microorganisms colonize plants, a step that could provide farmers an important tool to boost agricultural production. (2020-07-16)

SNMMI Image of the Year: Super-agers show resistance to tau and amyloid accumulation
Super-agers, or individuals whose cognitive skills are above the norm even at an advanced age, have been found to have increased resistance to tau and amyloid proteins, according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2020 Annual Meeting. (2020-07-15)

New study shows SARS-CoV-2 viral load peaks in the early stages of disease
In a retrospective study, investigators from New York University Langone Health found that the quantity of SARS-CoV-2 (viral load) collected from patients in the emergency department is significantly higher in patients with fewer or milder symptoms who did not require hospitalization--the opposite of what might be expected. Reporting in The American Journal of Pathology, they also found that a patient's history of cancer and cardiovascular disease is associated with higher viral loads even after adjusting for age. (2020-07-14)

Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington's and other diseases
Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background. (2020-06-30)

New research paves way for developing therapies that could slow down Alzheimer's
Neuroscientists and stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a research model that allows studying human hippocampal neurons, the brain cells primarily affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The study has been published in Stem Cell Reports. (2020-06-28)

It's not just Alzheimer's disease: Sanders-Brown research highlights form of dementia
The long-running study on aging and brain health at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Center has once again resulted in important new findings -- highlighting a complex and under-recognized form of dementia. (2020-06-26)

New technical approach can enhance diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension
The management and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension heavily relies on whether the pathology is localized in pulmonary arteries or veins. In particular, at early stages, it is challenging to distinguish pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) from the rare subtype of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) because clinical presentations of PAH and PVOD can be similar. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, reports gene expression analysis of lung explant tissue can accurately differentiate PAH from PVOD. (2020-06-15)

New method to identify genes that can drive development of brain tumors
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a method for identifying functional mutations and their effect on genes relevant to the development of glioblastoma. The results show that a specific, evolutionarily conserved, mutation in the vicinity of SEMA3C disrupts the binding of certain proteins whose task is to bind genes and regulate their activity. (2020-06-09)

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