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Current Pathology News and Events, Pathology News Articles.
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Alzheimer research: Noise-inducing neurons shut down memories
Neurons that are responsible for new experiences interfere with the signals of neurons that contain memories and thereby disturb the recall of memories - at least in mice. The research group of Martin Fuhrmann of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) reports this phenomenon in the scientific journal 'Nature Neuroscience'. The results of this study potentially shed new light on memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease. (2020-06-09)

Late blight research pairs spectroscopy with classic plant pathology diagnostics
Gold and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently published research showing how they used contact spectroscopy to non-destructively sense how plant pathogens differentially damage, impair, and alter plant traits during the course of infection. This research centered on late blight of potato and tomato. The hyperspectral sensors Gold and colleagues used measure light reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum- 7x more wavelengths than the human eye can see. (2020-06-09)

Deadly bacterial infection in pigs deciphered
New-born piglets often die painfully from infection with an intestinal bacterium. A team of researchers from 3 faculties at the University of Bern has now discovered how the bacterium causes fatal intestinal bleeding. They have thus made a breakthrough in veterinary research. Promising prospects for vaccinations and medications for use in humans too have now opened up. (2020-06-04)

1ST COVID autopsy series by LSUHealthNO pathologists reveals new cardiopulmonary findings
LSU Health New Orleans pathologists performed the first series of autopsies on African Americans who died from COVID-19 in New Orleans, and their findings provide new and critical information to guide patient management. The findings are published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. (2020-05-27)

Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological. Reductive stress causes pathological heart enlargement and diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model. (2020-05-14)

Predictive models could provide more accurate detection of early-stage Parkinson's disease
neuroscientists at York University have found five different models that use these types of non-motor clinical as well as biological variables to more accurately predict early-stage Parkinson's disease. Their five-model analysis is one of the first utilizing only non-motor clinical and biologic variables. Some models performed better than others but all distinguished early stage (preclinical) Parkinson's disease from healthy, age-matched controls, with better than 80 per cent accuracy. (2020-05-11)

AMP recommends minimum set of pharmacogenetic alleles to help standardize clinical genotyping testing for warfarin response
AMP has published consensus, evidence-based recommendations to aid in the design, validation and interpretation of clinical genotyping tests for the prediction of warfarin response. The manuscript, 'Recommendations for Clinical Warfarin Sensitivity Genotyping Allele Selection: A Joint Recommendation of the Association for Molecular Pathology and College of American Pathologists,' was released online ahead of publication in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. (2020-05-05)

Research suggests new therapeutic target for kidney diseases
Researchers have published a new study that suggests a signaling pathway called ROBO2 is a therapeutic target for kidney diseases, specifically kidney podocyte injury and glomerular diseases. (2020-05-04)

'Dirty' mice could help make a more effective flu vaccine
Studying mice that have been exposed to other illnesses could help make vaccine development processes more reflective of real-world conditions and lead to better vaccines, according to a new study. (2020-04-27)

Scientists uncover how Zika virus can spread through sexual contact
Zika virus is capable of replicating and spreading infectious particles within the outermost cells lining the vaginal tract, according to new research. The findings provide the first molecular-level insights into how the virus can move from person to person through sexual contact. (2020-04-27)

Marshall School of Medicine team explores surgery technology resulting in fewer incisions
Through the use of a newly developed needle arthroscope, incisionless and single-incision surgical procedures are possible for repairing certain types of knee and shoulder injuries suggests a series of Marshall University studies published in Arthroscopy Techniques, a companion to Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery. (2020-04-16)

COPD as a lung stem cell disease
Two internationally renowned stem cell researchers at the University of Houston have found an abundance of abnormal stem cells in the lungs of patients who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a leading cause of death worldwide. The team, who used single cell cloning of lung stem cells to make their discovery, is now targeting the cells for new therapeutics. (2020-04-15)

UCI-led study finds modifiable risk factors could play a role in Alzheimer's disease
Amyloid is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease, but the accumulation of these sticky proteins may not be the only risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published this week. (2020-04-08)

Drug shows promise in reversing kidney damage caused by lupus
A drug used for cancer therapy has shown promise in reversing kidney damage caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), according to a Yale-led study published April 8 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-04-08)

Removing belly fat before it sticks to you
University of Cincinnati researchers are producing in the lab a human protein tasked with removing triglycerides from the blood stream. Unlocking the secrets of human protein APOA 5 gives us a leg up in treating heart disease. (2020-03-19)

Loss of protein disturbs intestinal homeostasis and can drive cancer
An international team of researchers from the University of Zurich, the University Hospital Zurich, Heidelberg and Glasgow has identified a novel function for the cell death regulating protein MCL1: It is essential in protecting the intestine against cancer development -- independent of bacterial-driven inflammation. These findings have implications for the use of MCL1 inhibitors, currently being tested for cancer treatment. (2020-03-18)

Alzheimer risk genes converge on microglia
Our DNA determines a large part of our risk for Alzheimer's disease, but it remained unclear how many genetic risk factors contribute to disease. A team led by Prof. Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven) and Dr. Mark Fiers now show that many of risk factors affect brain maintenance cells called microglia, and more particularly their response to amyloid-beta, one of the proteins aggregating in the brains of Alzheimer patients. (2020-03-18)

First-ever pathology of the early phase of lung infection with the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)
An international team of clinicians and researchers for the first time have described the pathology of the SARS-CoV-2, or coronavirus, and published their findings in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2020-02-27)

KAT6A syndrome: Advances on the genetic bases and clinical picture of a rare disease
A research team has described five new cases of a rare disease -- known as KAT6A syndrome -- of which there are only eighty dominant cases worldwide. This neurological and developmental disorder, caused by alterations in the lysine acetyltransferase 6A gene (KAT6A), involves intellectual disability, language impairment, low muscle tone, cardiovascular malformation and eye defects, among other affectations. (2020-02-26)

Subtle decline in cognition predicts progression to Alzheimer's pathology
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that abnormal levels of beta-amyloid plaques in brain predict cognitive decline and higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, but also that cognitive performance predicts progression from normal to abnormal levels of beta-amyloid. (2020-02-14)

Hybrid microscope could bring digital biopsy to the clinic
By adding infrared capability to the ubiquitous, standard optical microscope, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hope to bring cancer diagnosis into the digital era. Pairing infrared measurements with high-resolution optical images and machine learning algorithms, the researchers created digital biopsies that closely correlated with traditional pathology techniques and also outperformed state-of-the-art infrared microscopes. (2020-02-12)

Can lithium halt progression of Alzheimer's disease?
In a new study, a team of researchers at McGill University has shown that, when given in a formulation that facilitates passage to the brain, lithium in doses up to 400 times lower than what is currently being prescribed for mood disorders is capable of both halting signs of advanced Alzheimer's pathology and of recovering lost cognitive abilities. (2020-01-24)

AI can be used to detect and grade prostate cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Tampere University in Finland have developed a method based on artificial intelligence for histopathological diagnosis and grading of prostate cancer. The AI-system has the potential to solve one of the bottlenecks in today's prostate cancer histopathology by providing more accurate diagnosis and better treatment decisions. The study, presented in The Lancet Oncology, shows that the AI-system is as good at identifying and grading prostate cancer as world-leading uro-pathologists. (2020-01-08)

Artificial intelligence identifies previously unknown features associated with cancer recurrence
Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developed by the RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP) in Japan has successfully found features in pathology images from human cancer patients, without annotation, that could be understood by human doctors. Further, the AI identified features relevant to cancer prognosis that were not previously noted by pathologists, leading to a higher accuracy of prostate cancer recurrence compared to pathologist-based diagnosis. (2019-12-18)

New software tool uses AI to help doctors identify cancer cells
UT Southwestern researchers have developed a software tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images -- giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes. (2019-12-09)

Using artificial intelligence to analyze placentas
A team of researchers has developed a novel solution that could produce accurate, automated and near-immediate placental diagnostic reports through computerized photographic image analysis. (2019-11-25)

Inflammatory processes drive progression of Alzheimer's and other brain diseases
Inflammation drives the progression of neurodegenerative brain diseases and plays a major role in the accumulation of tau proteins within neurons. An international research team led by the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn comes to this conclusion in the journal Nature. The results indicate that inflammatory processes represent a potential target for future therapies. (2019-11-20)

A new pathway to 'reprogram' killer cells
Killer cells of the immune system detect and kill infected cells or cancer cells. Researchers at the Institute of Pathology at the University of Bern have now discovered that the mechanism by which certain immune cells kill their target cells can also be used to control the killer cells themselves. This finding may be relevant to cancer immunotherapy. (2019-11-19)

Getting cancer drugs to the brain is difficult -- but a new 'road map' might make it easie
Purdue University scientists have provided the first comprehensive characterization of both the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers in brain metastases of lung cancer, which will serve as a road map for treatment development. The work was recently published in Oncotarget. (2019-11-12)

Self-cannibalizing mitochondria may set the stage for ALS development
Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a new phenomenon in the brain that could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration that is seen in diseases such as ALS, which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking.  The discovery was so novel, the scientists needed to coin a new term to describe it: mitoautophagy, a collection of self-destructive mitochondria in diseased upper motor neurons of the brain that begin to disintegrate from within at a very early age. (2019-11-07)

Gene variant may help protect against Alzheimer's disease
A new study provides insights on why some people may be more resistant to Alzheimer's disease than others. (2019-11-04)

Seeking better treatment for ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease
In neurodegenerative disease ALS, proteins called TDP-43 aggregate in patient tissues. A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found that in ALS, TDP-43 proteins are dysfunctional, causing de-silencing of retrotransposons or 'jumping genes.' (2019-10-29)

Combination of more hospitalizations and brain pathologies linked to faster cognitive decline
Older people who experienced more hospitalizations and also had more Alzheimer's pathology in their brain experienced the fastest rates of cognitive decline, according to study results published in the October 15, 2019 online issue of the Annals of Neurology. (2019-10-22)

Metabolic disturbance in the brain exacerbates, may forewarn Alzheimer's pathology
A better understanding of the metabolic processes in the brain -- specifically disturbances resulting from neurodegenerative diseases -- has important implications for potential treatments. The research was presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2019-10-20)

New findings about mechanisms regulating brain inflammation
These new findings about mechanisms regulating brain inflammation open a new pathway in the field of neuroinflammation. This is important because in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson´s and Alzheimer´s diseases, where there is no effective treatment yet, it is considered that microglia play a key role in their pathology and progression. Therefore, discovery of new mechanisms regulating microglial function could become new therapeutic targets to use in clinic. (2019-10-15)

Study 'cures' oldest case of deafness in human evolution
An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory. (2019-10-15)

Diabetes-Alzheimer's link explored at Neuroscience 2019
Surprising links exist between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, and researchers are beginning to unpack the pathology that connects the two. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-10-07)

Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer
Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer. They have also shown that cancer progression can be controlled by artificially increasing the amount of this protein in the cells. These findings could lead to the development of new therapies against pancreatic cancer. (2019-10-07)

Placenta pathology may clarify racial disparities in preemie health outcomes
African-American infants are twice as likely to die in the first year of life than white infants, for reasons that are complex and not well understood. Results from a recent study suggest that specific abnormalities in the placenta from African-American preterm births may hold clues to the physical mechanisms behind racial disparities in preemie health outcomes. (2019-10-03)

Potential target for diabetes-associated Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified a protein that may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology in type-2 diabetes, reports a new study of male mice and human brain tissue. The research, published in JNeurosci, could have implications for future drug development. (2019-09-16)

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