Current Patient Care News and Events

Current Patient Care News and Events, Patient Care News Articles.
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Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Perception critical to women's breast reconstruction decision making
Women who undergo surgical treatment for breast cancer often also have reconstructive surgery but new research from QUT in Australia reveals many feel left out of the decision making process. Approximately one in every three women surveyed stated their surgeon had more input than they did. (2021-02-18)

Physical therapy after c-section improves outcomes
Women who received physical therapy after undergoing a cesarean section had significantly improved outcomes compared to those who did not according to a new study from University of Missouri Health Care. (2021-02-17)

Low-value health care drops only marginally despite effort to curb practices
An estimated 10% to 20% of health care spending consists of low-value care -- patient services that offer no net clinical benefit in specific scenarios. A new study finds that spending on low-value health care among fee-for-service Medicare recipients dropped only marginally from 2014 to 2018, despite both a national campaign to better educate clinicians and increasing use of payment revisions that discourage wasteful care. (2021-02-16)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

New tool predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation
A mathematical model predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation. The results of the study by a research team from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona-Spain) and the Institute of Health Research Pere Virgili show a potential reduction of the current rate of reintubation from 9% to 1% by using machine learning tools. Data from a thousand intensive-care patients with respiratory difficulties has been processed and analysed to create this tool (2021-02-15)

Improving discharge process key to reducing avoidable rehospitalizations, MU study finds
Throughout her career, Lori Popejoy provided hands-on clinical care in a variety of health care settings, from hospitals and nursing homes to community centers and home health care agencies. (2021-02-15)

Difficulties to care for ICU patients caused by COVID-19
Intensive care nurses highlight patient isolation, fear of the unknown and using nurses who do not usually work in the ICU as key factors in caring for critical COVID-19 patients (2021-02-10)

COVID-19 telemonitoring program helps reduce hospital admissions and ER visits
New Rochelle, NY, February 9, 2021--The rapid upscaling of a telemonitoring program in which health care providers performed daily telemedicine check-ins on COVID-19 patients faced a unique set of challenges. (2021-02-10)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the most definitive evidence to date that, of the two drugs recommended for light sedation of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU, one is as effective and safe as the other. (2021-02-02)

Neuromuscular disease registry helps patients access research, clinical trials, new genetic tests, and therapies
Amsterdam, February 2, 2021 - The Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry (CNDR) was launched in 2010 to increase efficient patient access to cutting-edge research and clinical trials, to increase understanding of the natural history and epidemiology of neuromuscular disease across Canada, and to facilitate research collaboration. (2021-02-02)

Lack of ICU beds tied to thousands of excess COVID-19 deaths, Yale study finds
New Haven, Conn. --A new study by Yale researchers found a significant association between the availability of hospital resources -- particularly ICU beds -- and patient mortality during the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-02)

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care
The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, enabling rural primary care teams to improve cardiovascular health and optimizing emergency room use after clinic hours. (2021-02-01)

Simulation helps refine pediatric care guidelines for COVID-19
DALLAS - Jan. 28, 2021 - Simulation can be a viable way to quickly evaluate and refine new medical guidelines and educate hospital staff in new procedures, a recent study from UT Southwestern's Department of Pediatrics shows. The findings, published recently in the journal Pediatric Quality and Safety and originally shaped around new COVID-19-related pediatric resuscitation procedures at UTSW and Children's Health, could eventually be used to help implement other types of guidelines at medical centers nationwide. (2021-01-28)

Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country. Stigma against long-term users of prescription opioids, likely related to the prospect of taking on a patient who might have an opioid use disorder or addiction, appears to play a role. (2021-01-27)

Controlling pain after surgery doesn't have to mean opioids, study shows
As surgeons balance the need to control their patients' post-surgery pain with the risk that a routine operation could become the gateway to long-term opioid use or addiction, a new study shows the power of an approach that takes a middle way. (2021-01-27)

Most patients find teledermatology appointments suitable alternative to office visits
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) surveyed dermatology patients at the GW Medical Faculty Associates to evaluate patient satisfaction with teledermatology appointments. The team found the majority of patients found the experience a suitable alternative to in-person office visits. (2021-01-25)

Combining best of both worlds for cancer modeling
Treatment options for many types of cancers remain limited, due partly to the in vitro tools used to model cancers and that results from animal studies do not always translate well to human disease. These shortcomings point to a clear need for a better, patient-specific model. Researchers suggest bioengineered microscale organotypic models can address this need. They discuss the advantages and capabilities of this technique, as well as its challenges, in the journal APL Bioengineering. (2021-01-21)

45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts, which could affect COVID vaccination
As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don't yet have access to the 'patient portal' online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. The poll finds that 45% of adults aged 65 to 80, and 42% of adults aged 50 to 80, said they hadn't set up an account with their health provider's portal system. (2021-01-15)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians? (2021-01-12)

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists. (2021-01-12)

Nurse involvement promotes discussion of advanced care planning during office visits
Most doctors would agree that advanced care planning (ACP) for patients, especially older adults, is important in providing the best and most appropriate health care over the course of a patient's life. (2021-01-11)

Simple monitoring could reduce medicine misuse in care homes
Nurse-led monitoring of patients for signs and symptoms associated with documented 'undesirable effects' of medicines has potential to prevent avoidable harm, and optimize prescribing. (2021-01-11)

COVID forced psychiatric care online. Many patients want it to stay there, study finds
A new study suggests that more than half of outpatient psychiatry patients whose appointments were suddenly converted to video or phone interactions by the pandemic will want to keep going with virtual mental health care even after the pandemic subsides. The convenience of seeing a provider without leaving home, and avoiding potential exposure to the coronavirus, factor heavily into this preference. So does a patient's initial experience with seeing a provider virtually. (2021-01-08)

The true cost of chemotherapy
New research reveals the non-healthcare costs of chemotherapy for breast cancer patients. It includes the cost of lost productivity, work absence, and 'out-of-pocket' personal costs such as paying for transport and parking for treatment, the cost of wigs and new bras, and over the counter medications. The research team say that better targeting of treatment could help avoid placing unnecessary costs upon patients, their caregivers and wider society. (2021-01-04)

Study shows incorporating telemedicine helps surgical practices
A new study that records patient volume at Stony Brook Medicine's Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center reveals that follow-up telehealth visits are highly effective during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in the December issue of the Annals of Surgery, serves as an example that surgical practices can continue to thrive with the help of telemedicine during the pandemic. (2020-12-18)

UBC study highlights need for more effective staffing in care homes
Even the best-managed long-term care homes will need to step up to get through the second wave of the pandemic (2020-12-17)

Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint. (2020-12-17)

Interventional radiology associated with an increased risk for preventable adverse events
In a review article in the journal Radiology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), suggest there is a critical need to renew understanding of adverse events and complications within interventional radiology. They also call for a robust recommitment to patient safety and quality assurance in clinical practice, continuing medical education and graduate medical education. (2020-12-17)

UCI researchers create model to calculate COVID-19 health outcomes
University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers have created a machine-learning model to predict the probability that a COVID-19 patient will need a ventilator or ICU care. The tool is free and available online for any healthcare organization to use. (2020-12-17)

Johns Hopkins Medicine expert weighs devastating impact of COVID-19 on health care workers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, health care workers have been at the forefront of the battle against the life-threatening illness. Sadly, they are not immune to the effects of the disease. Many have contracted COVID-19, and some have died. (2020-12-15)

From publication bias to lost in information
From publication bias to lost in information In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, IQWiG researchers call for a central, public and worldwide portal for clinical trials (2020-12-11)

MGB study finds majority of COVID-19 patients died in hospital
Brigham researchers found that 95.5 percent of individuals who died with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in the MGB health system between February 18 and May 18, 2020 did so in the hospital. To better characterize the intensity of end-of-life care and promote discussions about at-home care, the researchers analyzed specific death settings, determining that roughly 40% of hospital deaths occurred in the ICU. (2020-12-11)

Health care workers' COVID infections driven mainly by community exposure
In a well-resourced health system with adequate PPE, health care worker risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection was more strongly driven by community exposure than patient exposure early in the pandemic, reports a new study. The study of 6,510 health care workers is the largest systematically collected cohort study of health care worker risk for SARS CoV-2 in the U.S. Nurses were the only occupation group with higher risks once community exposure was accounted for. (2020-12-09)

Survey: COVID-19 prevention top concern of home-care agencies
Tens of thousands of Massachusetts residents depend on home care to support their health as they age or cope with physical challenges. That care often requires close personal contact, increasing the risk of contracting COVID-19 among both home-care clients and the aides who provide their care. (2020-12-08)

Study shows that active surveillance holds promise as a treatment option for low-risk thyroid cancer
Results from a new study co-led by researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Department of Surgery at Kuma Hospital in Kobe, Japan, show that active surveillance can be successfully implemented as a viable treatment option for patients with low-risk thyroid cancer. (2020-12-07)

Clinical trial results address concerns about pharmacogenetic testing
Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of pharmacogenetic testing related to cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.After one year, the cholesterol levels in the group who received their pharmacogenetic results were not higher than those in the group who did not receive their results, and they were not less likely to receive medical care meeting recommended guidelines. (2020-12-03)

Study: Telemedicine use disparity during COVID-19 among head and neck cancer patients
Retrospective research by Henry Ford otolaryngologists found telemedicine use disparity among head and neck cancer patients. (2020-12-02)

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