Current Patterns News and Events

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Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton. Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22 (2021-02-22)

Ultraviolet 'television' for animals helps us better understand them
University of Queensland scientists have developed an ultraviolet 'television' display designed to help researchers better understand how animals see the world. (2021-02-18)

Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

How comparable different stress tests are
Scientists use many different tests to investigate what happens in the brain in people experiencing stress. It is unclear to what extent the various methods with which subjects are placed under stress are comparable to each other. In a meta-analysis, researchers compared 31 previous studies that had investigated stress using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The team worked out which regions of the brain are activated as standard during stress and which stress tests trigger similar activation patterns. (2021-02-12)

AI researchers ask: What's going on inside the black box?
Brain-like artificial networks are often referred to as a ''black box'' because researchers do not know how they learn and make predictions. Researchers at CSHL reported a way to peek inside the box and identify key features on which the computer relies, particularly when trying to identify complex DNA sequences. (2021-02-08)

Smartwatch sensors enable remote monitoring & treatment guidance for Parkinson's patients
Scientists have developed a monitoring system based on commercial smartwatches that can detect movement issues and tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-03)

Synthetic biology reinvents development
The research team have used synthetic biology to develop a new type of genetic design that can reproduce some of the key processes that enable creating structures in natural systems, from termite nests to the development of embryos. (2021-02-01)

Biomarkers in mother's plasma predict a type of autism in offspring with 100% accuracy
UC Davis MIND Institute researchers used machine learning to crunch 10,000 autoantibody pattern combinations to identify maternal biomarkers associated with a sub-type of autism. The findings have implications for early diagnosis and intervention. (2021-01-25)

Early breeding reduced harmful mutations in sorghum
A new Cornell University study found that harmful mutations in sorghum landraces - early domesticated crops - decreased compared to their wild relatives through the course of domestication and breeding. (2021-01-20)

Bio-inspired: How lobsters can help make stronger 3D printed concrete
New research addresses some of the technical issues that still need to be solved for 3D printed concrete to be strong enough for use in more free-form structures. Researchers found lobster-inspired printing patterns can make 3DCP stronger and help direct the strength where it's needed. And combining the patterns with a concrete mix enhanced with steel fibres can deliver a material that's stronger than traditionally-made concrete. (2021-01-19)

Eating habits partly down to your genetics, finds new study
Your food intake patterns are partly under genetic control, according to the latest research from researchers at King's College London, published today in the journal Twin Research and Human Genetics. (2021-01-19)

Zebra stripes, leopard spots: frozen metal patterns defy conventional metallurgy
''Stripy zebra, spotty leopard...'' Pattern formation and pattern recognition entertains children and scientists alike. Alan Turing's 1950s model explaining patterns in two-substance systems is used by metallurgists to explain microscopic internal stripes and spots. A study out today explains exotic patterns, counter to Turing's theory, forming on the liquid metal gallium, which melts in the hand. The previously ignored surface-solidification phenomenon improves fundamental understanding of liquid-metal alloys, with a potential patterning tool, and advanced applications in future electronics and optics. (2021-01-18)

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists. (2021-01-12)

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of new developments in the Arctic ice, and this tool provides a faster solution. (2021-01-12)

Imagining a face reactivates face-detecting neurons in humans
Face-sensitive neurons in humans employ distinct activity patterns to encode individual faces; those patterns reactivate when imagining the face, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-11)

Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
In a new paper published in Nature, climate researchers from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory describe a new method of tracking the ancient history of the westerly winds--a proxy for what we may experience in a future warming world. (2021-01-06)

Using wearable activity trackers to distinguish COVID-19 from flu
By analyzing Fitbit data and self-reported symptoms, researchers distinguished trends in heart rate, step count, and symptom duration between patients with flu and those with COVID-19. While both showed similar-looking spikes in resting heart rate and decreases in average step count, COVID-19 symptoms lasted longer and peaked later. The results appear December 12 in the journal Patterns. (2020-12-21)

Seeking answers in ferroelectric patterning
Why do some ferroelectric materials display 'bubble'-shaped patterning, while others display complex, labyrinthine patterns? A FLEET/UNSW study finds the changing patterns in ferroelectric films are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics, with topological defects driving subsequent evolution. Understanding the physics behind ferroelectric material patterns is crucial for designing advanced low-energy ferroelectric electronics, or brain-inspired neuromorphic computing. (2020-12-18)

Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. This is the conclusion of a study published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Fast walking in narrow corridors can increase COVID-19 transmission risk
Simulations have been used to predict droplet dispersal patterns in situations where COVID-19 might be spread and results in Physics of Fluids show the importance of the space shape in modeling how droplets move. The simulations are used to determine flow patterns behind a walking individual in spaces of different shape. The results reveal a higher transmission risk for children in some instances, such as behind quickly moving people in a long narrow hallway. (2020-12-15)

Oregon researchers find that like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to University of Oregon researchers. (2020-12-11)

Parents shouldn't worry about their baby's inconsistent sleep patterns
New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night around the time they reach six months of age. But according to a new study led by McGill Professor Marie-Helene Pennestri, parents should view sleep consolidation as a process, instead of a milestone to be achieved at a specific age. (2020-12-02)

The making of mysterious mazes: how animals got their complex colorations
A researcher at Osaka University uncovered a simple mechanism underlying the intricate skin patterns of animals through comprehensive analyses of the diversity of fish colorations. (2020-12-02)

Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
DSI postdoctoral fellow Sandrine Müller uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior. (2020-11-16)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

Urban gulls adapt foraging schedule to human activity patterns
If you've ever seen a seagull snatch a pasty or felt their beady eyes on your sandwich in the park, you'd be right to suspect they know exactly when to strike to increase their chances of getting a human snack. A new study by the University of Bristol is the most in-depth look to date at the foraging behaviours of urban gulls and how they've adapted to patterns of human activity in a city. (2020-11-10)

Researchers isolate and decode brain signal patterns for specific behaviors
A standing challenge has been isolating patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior, such as finger movements. Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that resolved this challenge by uncovering neural patterns missed by other methods. This could both enable new neuroscience discoveries and enhance future brain-machine interfaces. (2020-11-09)

A.I. tool provides more accurate flu forecasts
Yue Ning and her team at Stevens Institute of Technology trained their A.I. tool using real-world state and regional data from the U.S. and Japan, then tested its forecasts against historical flu data. By incorporating location data, the A.I. system is able to outperform other state-of-the-art forecasting methods, delivering up to an 11% increase in accuracy and predicting influenza outbreaks up to 15 weeks in advance. (2020-11-02)

Physical activity and sleep in adults with arthritis
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has examined patterns of 24-hour physical activity and sleep among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and knee osteoarthritis. (2020-10-07)

Drugs aren't typically tested on women. AI could correct that bias
Researchers at Columbia University have developed AwareDX--Analysing Women At Risk for Experiencing Drug toXicity--a machine learning algorithm that identifies and predicts differences in adverse drug effects between men and women by analyzing 50 years' worth of reports in an FDA database. The algorithm, described September 22 in the journal Patterns, automatically corrects for the biases in these data that stem from an overrepresentation of male subjects in clinical research trials. (2020-09-30)

New way of analyzing soil organic matter will help predict climate change
A new way of analyzing the chemical composition of soil organic matter will help scientists predict how soils store carbon -- and how soil carbon may affect climate in the future, says a Baylor University researcher. (2020-09-25)

Evolutionary paths: Scientists have found new patterns in protein evolution
Russian scientists studied the trends in the evolution of amino acid sequences of proteins in vertebrates and insects. External factors can be considered as a reason for positive selection affecting genomic positions and serve as an essential aspect of the rapid evolution. But the effect of epistasis is manifested in positions under negative selection, as a result of which substitutions occur less often in them - they evolve more slowly. (2020-09-18)

Analysis of COVID-19 publications identifies research gaps
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific and medical journals have published over 100,000 studies on SARS-CoV-2. But according to data scientists who created a machine-learning tool to analyze the deluge of publications, basic lab-based studies on the microbiology of the virus, including research on its pathogenesis and mechanisms of viral transmission, are lacking. Their analysis appears September 16 in the journal Patterns. (2020-09-17)

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function. (2020-09-17)

Study suggests unconscious learning underlies belief in God
Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University. (2020-09-09)

New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution. The scientists Kenji Fukushima and David D. Pollock report this finding in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-08)

In sickness and in health
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that for men with major cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, their wives are more likely to suffer from the same diseases. These results emphasize the need for extending disease concerns beyond relatives who share ancestry to the patient's spouse. Further, couple-based interventions are desirable for the management of lifestyle diseases, and spouses should be informed of their risk. (2020-08-25)

Equatorial winds ripple down to Antarctica
A CIRES-led team has uncovered a critical connection between winds at Earth's equator and atmospheric waves 6,000 miles away at the South Pole. The team has found, for the first time, evidence of a Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) -- an atmospheric circulation pattern that originates at the equator--at McMurdo, Antarctica. (2020-08-17)

Study finds cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links. (2020-08-13)

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape. (2020-08-11)

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