Current Pediatricians News and Events

Current Pediatricians News and Events, Pediatricians News Articles.
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CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C
In a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) describe the array of rashes seen in MIS-C patients at their hospital through late July 2020, providing photos and information that could help doctors diagnose future cases. (2021-02-22)

Innovative parenting programs address inequality in young children's development
Parent education programs and interventions that begin shortly after the birth of a child have shown to significantly impact parenting behaviors that support social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty, according to a study led by pediatricians and psychologists across the country, including NYU Grossman School of Medicine, NYU Steinhardt, and the University of Pittsburgh. (2021-02-19)

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems. The best-practice approach, known as the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding, has now been rigorously tested and peer reviewed, resulting in the quantifiable tool sDOR.2-6y. (2021-02-08)

Bullied lesbian, gay and bisexual students more likely to carry weapons
A new study has found youth who report carrying a weapon have higher odds of experiencing bullying and bullying-related victimization. Minoritized student populations, especially sexual minority youth disproportionately experience bullying and bullying victimization. (2020-12-08)

Researchers uncover health disparities in childhood obesity and access to treatments
The use of bariatric surgery to treat severe obesity in adolescents, and the racial disparities in access to that treatment, were analyzed in a retrospective study published in Annals of Surgery by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-10-28)

E-modules increase knowledge, attitude and confidence related to childhood adversity and trauma-informed care
Training health care professionals in the skills and capacity to respond adequately to children and adults who have been exposed trauma, such as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), is recognized as an essential need in health care. But opportunities to educate physicians and physician-trainees in the science of childhood adversity and trauma-informed care are limited. (2020-10-12)

For vulnerable families, the pandemic's effect on mental health is swift and harsh
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic swiftly and substantially worsened mental health among US hourly service workers and their children -- especially those experiencing multiple hardships, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and Barnard College. (2020-09-02)

Experts question need to wait days between introducing new solid foods to infants
The current recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) call for introducing to infants one single-ingredient food at a time and waiting three to five days to observe for food allergy before introducing another new food. However, the long waiting period might be too long, given that food allergy becomes apparent within minutes to a few hours after eating a new food. (2020-08-17)

Only a third of pediatricians fully follow guidelines on peanut allergy prevention
While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study published in JAMA Network Open. (2020-07-15)

Age of sexual debut among young gay-identified sexual minority men
Young gay sexual minority men - especially Black and Latino youth - have their first sexual experiences at younger ages, emphasizing a need for comprehensive and inclusive sex education, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-07-14)

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health. (2020-06-16)

Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. (2020-03-04)

Despite burdens most pediatricians very supportive of national vaccination program
Despite bureaucratic hurdles, the vast majority of pediatricians want to keep participating in a national program that provides vaccinations at no cost to children who are on Medicaid, uninsured, or who are American Indian/Alaska Native, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-02-21)

Social factors play a key role in missed well-child care visits
Despite the benefits of well-child care visits (WCV), up to half of WCVs are missed. A team of researchers and pediatricians at Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Washington, and the University of Vermont sought to understand the challenges that prevent families from attending their child's scheduled appointment. (2020-02-18)

Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth often not tested for virus
Most Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth are not later tested to see if they acquired the virus, according to a study by researchers at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt and the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy. (2020-02-14)

Alarmingly low rates of HIV testing among at-risk teenage boys
The majority of teenage boys most at risk for developing HIV are not being tested for the disease, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. This lack of testing feeds the growing epidemic of undiagnosed HIV infections in the United States. (2020-02-11)

Visits to pediatricians on the decline
Commercially insured children in the US are seeing pediatricians less often than they did a decade ago, according to a new analysis led by a pediatrician-scientist at the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. But whether that's good or bad is unclear, the researchers say in the study, published today in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-21)

Link found between maternal depression and atopic dermatitis in children
A recent study suggests that maternal depression in the postpartum period, and even beyond, is associated with the development of atopic dermatitis throughout childhood and adolescence. (2020-01-21)

Study: Pharmaceutical companies marketing stimulants to physicians
Results of a new study show that a large number of physicians in the US may have received marketing payments from pharmaceutical companies that produce stimulant medications. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's (BMC) Grayken Center for Addiction, the first of its kind study found that one in 18 physicians received some form of pharmaceutical marketing about stimulants, most often in the form of food or beverage. (2020-01-21)

Most youths surviving opioid overdose not getting timely treatment to avoid recurrence
A study of more than 4 million Medicaid claims records during a recent seven-year period concludes that less than a third of the nearly 3,800 US adolescents and young adults who experienced a nonfatal opioid overdose got timely (within 30 days) follow-up addiction treatment to curb or prevent future misuse and reduce the risk of a second overdose. (2020-01-16)

Tennessee review: 2% of providers account for 25% of pediatric antibiotic prescriptions
Fewer than 2% of providers accounted for 25% of antibiotic prescriptions for children in Tennessee, with the highest number of prescriptions coming from general pediatricians and those who graduated prior to 2000, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2020-01-15)

Addressing the emotional toll of pediatric chronic conditions
Report led by experts at Cincinnati Children's, published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics, calls upon pediatricians to increase efforts to support emotional health of parents of children with chronic conditions. (2020-01-09)

Children with food allergies seen faster under new paediatric model
Children with food allergies are seen 10 months sooner and have fewer allergic reactions when treated by a paediatrician in their own community, a new study shows. (2019-12-04)

AAP recommends greater access to surgical treatments for severe obesity
Recognizing that severe obesity is a serious and worsening public health crisis in children and adolescents, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is calling for greater access to metabolic and bariatric surgery, one of the few strategies that has been shown to be effective in treating the most severe forms of the chronic disease. (2019-10-27)

Decision support tool reduces unneeded referrals of low-risk patients with chest pain
A simple evidence-based change to standard practice could avert needless referrals of low-risk patients to cardiac specialists, potentially saving nearly $4 million in annual health care spending while also easing worried parents' minds. (2019-10-25)

New DNA 'clock' could help measure development in young children
Scientists have developed a molecular 'clock' that could reshape how pediatricians measure and monitor childhood growth and potentially allow for an earlier diagnosis of life-altering development disorders. (2019-10-15)

First large-scale study of universal screening for autism raises questions about accuracy
In the first large, real-world study of universal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that the most widely used and researched screening tool is less accurate than shown in previous studies conducted in research laboratory settings. The new study also revealed significant disparities in detecting early autism symptoms in minority, urban and low-income children. (2019-09-27)

Study questions routine sleep studies to evaluate snoring in children
A new finding from the University of Maryland School of Medicine suggests that the pediatric sleep study -- used to diagnose pediatric sleep apnea and to measure improvement after surgery -- may be an unreliable predictor of who will benefit from having an adenotonsillectomy. (2019-09-18)

When is a child an adult?
When does childhood end? That's the question international researchers are asking as they chart age cut-offs for paediatric services around the world. Adolescent Health Professor at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and the University of Melbourne Susan Sawyer says previous research has found that global health systems do not meet adolescents' needs, yet pediatricians are well placed to provide age-appropriate care to adolescents -- especially if they are trained in adolescent medicine. (2019-09-18)

Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement
Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. A new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus shows that physicians' delivery and communication practices must improve to boost vaccination completion rates. (2019-09-16)

Study shows pediatricians can help parents to quit smoking
An NIH-funded study published in JAMA Pediatrics has shown pediatricians can help parents quit smoking. (2019-08-12)

Bringing mental health care into pediatricians' offices works, finds 5-year study
A five-year study at Boston Children's Hospital reports success with a program it started in 2013 to bring much-needed behavioral health services directly into primary care pediatricians' offices. As reported today in Pediatrics, the program improved children's access to behavioral health care, with only minor increases in cost, and got high marks from participating pediatric practices. (2019-06-11)

Bariatric surgery can be safe and effective for adolescents
Pediatricians are often reluctant to recommend bariatric surgery for teen-agers, but a Rutgers-led study concludes it is a justifiable treatment for adolescents with persistent extreme obesity if they can maintain a healthy lifestyle afterward. (2019-05-28)

Plenary addresses importance of 2020 US Census and challenge of the young child undercount
The Census not only determines how over $675 billion in federal funds are allocated, but it is used to draw district lines and to give voice to those who live in the US. (2019-04-28)

New AAP research examines US pediatric residents' experience treating gun injuries
A new American Academy of Pediatrics study examines US pediatric residents' experience during training in caring for children injured by guns, and their attitudes toward counseling families and public policies to address gun injury. (2019-04-27)

HPV vaccine coverage is far behind other infant vaccines in many US states
Trends in HPV vaccine uptake in children in the US. (2019-04-27)

Survey of pediatricians and family physicians assesses HPV vaccine delivery practices
Current primary care practices and experiences with the delivery of HPV vaccine. (2019-04-27)

New study aims to better understand Kawasaki disease
A new study looks to define the antibody characteristics, including clonality, of plasmablasts during Kawasaki disease. (2019-04-27)

New research examines association between gun access and adolescent health
Access to guns and perceived unsafe school environments have been associated with gun-related injury, depression and suicidality among adolescents. Whether widespread acceptance of guns among peers alters these associations, however, is unknown. (2019-04-27)

Pediatricians and nurse practitioners report using strategies to improve HPV vaccination
Pediatricians and nurse practitioners report using several strategies to improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, yet also perceive barriers, according to a national American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS) network study. (2019-04-27)

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