Current Peer Influence News and Events

Current Peer Influence News and Events, Peer Influence News Articles.
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Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

Ageism and sexism barring grandmothers from initiatives to save newborn lives in Global South
Ageism, sexism, and Western ideals of the nuclear family have excluded grandmothers from national and international policy initiatives to save newborn lives in the Global South, suggests an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2021-02-15)

COVID-infected mothers separated from their babies affects breastfeeding outcomes
It may be safe for COVID-infected mothers to maintain contact with their babies. Keeping them apart can cause maternal distress and have a negative effect on exclusive breastfeeding later in infancy (2021-02-10)

Can the brain resist the group opinion?
Scientists at HSE University have learned that disagreeing with the opinion of other people leaves a 'trace' in brain activity, which allows the brain to later adjust its opinion in favour of the majority-held point of view. The article was published in Scientific Reports. (2021-02-08)

UC study: The dangers of drugged driving are outpacing drunk driving
A recent study of drugged driving, by a team of University of Cincinnati researchers, shows that a sizable percentage of individuals reported the use of marijuana and other illicit drugs while operating behind the wheel. (2021-01-26)

Social influence matters when it comes to following pandemic guidelines
New research published in the British Journal of Psychology indicates that social influence has a large impact on people's adherence to COVID-19 guidelines. (2021-01-21)

Having plants at home improved psychological well-being during lockdown
This was agreed by 74% of the more than 4,200 respondents in 46 countries. In fact, more than half of them (55.8%) stated that they would have preferred to have more plants in their house during that difficult period. (2021-01-21)

Methods in studying cycad leaf nutrition found to be inconsistent and incomplete
Collective research to date regarding nutrients found in the leaves of contemporary cycad species has been inconsistent as far as data collection and narrow in scope, according to a University of Guam-led literature review published on Nov. 19 in Horticulturae journal. (2021-01-21)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Many parents say teens with anxiety, depression may benefit from peer confidants at school
Three-quarters of parents in a new national poll think peers better understand teen challenges, compared to teachers or counselors in the school. (2021-01-18)

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine collection highlights 15 years of scientific discovery
Editors of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine have identified some of the most significant articles in the publication's history, publishing new commentaries on them in a special 15th anniversary collection. The 15 commentaries from associate editors and members of the journal's editorial board describe the impact of the selected articles both at the time of their publication and today. (2021-01-14)

SUTD develops new model of influence maximization
The model will enhance the robustness of networks to adversarial attacks and will benefit both practitioners and organizations. (2021-01-12)

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19. (2021-01-12)

An analysis of 145 journals suggests peer review itself may not explain gender discrepancies in publication rates
An analysis of 145 scholarly journals found that, among various factors that could contribute to gender bias and lesser representation of women in science, the peer review process itself is unlikely to be the primary cause of publishing inequalities. However, Flaminio Squazzoni and colleagues emphasize that the study does not account for many other factors. (2021-01-06)

Why an early start is key to developing musical skill later in life
Is there, as some have suggested, a developmental period early in life when the brain is especially receptive to musical training? The answer, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science, is probably not. (2020-12-22)

Nobel Prize reflects perseverance in scientific research
New Rochelle, NY, December 21, 2020--The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to three researchers for their discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The undying perseverance that it took to find and cure this elusive virus (2020-12-21)

One in five doctors in Sweden has a doctor parent
One in five doctors in Sweden has a parent who is also trained in medicine, more than triple the proportion for doctors born three decades earlier, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not. (2020-12-10)

Science paper links root endodermis and microbiota in mineral balance
Valéria Custódio, ITQB NOVA PhD Student and GREEN-IT member, is a co-author of the paper, which offers new insight on the importance of the relationship between microbiota and root endodermis. (2020-12-09)

Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2020-12-07)

Less COVID-19 transmission seen in countries with more intense testing
Lacking vaccines, countries have relied on multiple non-pharmaceutical interventions to control COVID-19 transmission. Despite the urging of the World Health Organization (WHO) in March to ''test, test, and test,'' policy makers disagree on what is adequate testing. (2020-12-02)

Researchers show risk-averse teens sway peers to make safer choices
Prior studies have shown adolescents are likely to experiment along with friends who use drugs and alcohol. But do friends who avoid risks have similar influential power? In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Virginia Tech neuroscientists at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC show that observing peers making sound decisions may help teenagers avoid risky situations. (2020-11-30)

Forming beliefs in a world of filter bubbles
Why do so many Republicans still believe that the recent US presidential election was fraudulent? Is it possible to reach coronavirus deniers with factual arguments? A study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University of Amsterdam provides insights into what it is that stops people from changing their minds. Their findings have been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B. (2020-11-25)

Depression, social anxiety, and use of mobile dating apps
Depression symptoms and social anxiety are associated with greater use of mobile dating applications among women (2020-11-02)

'Patient activation' may improve quality of life in individuals with kidney disease
In individuals with chronic kidney disease who received online peer mentoring, improved patient activation correlated with improvements in various aspects of quality of life. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-23)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Does classroom indoor environmental quality affect teaching and learning?
What impact does a classroom's indoor environment have on teaching, learning, and students' academic achievement in colleges and universities? This is the question researchers set out to answer in their analysis of all relevant published studies. (2020-10-21)

Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
A study from the University of Cordoba (Spain) analyzed degrees of acceptance, popularity and friendship at different stages of victimization in the field of school bullying (2020-10-21)

Why school bullying prevention programs that involve peers may be harmful to victims
School bullying has been identified as harmful to students' mental health. Many studies have evaluated the effectiveness of bullying prevention programs, finding mixed results in general and no benefits overall for secondary school students. A new review explores why encouraging peers to defend victims may actually cause more harm than good. (2020-10-20)

Oncotarget: Induction of phenotypic changes in HER2-postive breast cancer cells
The cover for issue 30 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''RNAseq results demonstrating differences between normal, cancer, and redirected cells,'' by Frank-Kamenetskii, et al. which reported that the influence of breast cancer cells on normal cells of the microenvironment, such as fibroblasts and macrophages, has been heavily studied but the influence of normal epithelial cells on breast cancer cells has not. (2020-10-17)

And the winner is... dependent on judging accountability
A new study suggests that the status of award nominees combined with the level of social connection that they have with members of a judging panel can work both ways towards determining how successful they are -- depending on whether or not they are judged publicly or privately. (2020-10-13)

Foreign election interference: A global response
The increasing threat of foreign interference in elections has driven six nations to take similar approaches to combat this pervasive threat. A review of the details to their responses brings out valuable differences and insights. (2020-10-13)

Age does not contribute to COVID-19 susceptibility
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2. However, development of symptoms, progression of the disease, and mortality are age-dependent. (2020-10-12)

Cannabis ads and store location influence youth marijuana use
States may want to consider the proximity of cannabis retailers and cannabis advertising to neighborhoods to prevent underage use of the drug, according to new WSU research. (2020-10-08)

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's ''ground game,'' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base. (2020-10-07)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Increase in alcohol-industry funded research is a cause for concern, study suggests
A study by the University of York has found that since 2009, there has been a 56% increase in research funded by alcohol companies or affiliated organisations - with some studies making claims about the health benefits of alcohol. (2020-09-16)

Aiming for accuracy
Artificial intelligence and machine learning could enhance scientific peer review as scientists rush to publish COVID-related research. (2020-09-15)

Children will wait to impress others -- another twist on the classic marshmallow test
When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others. (2020-09-10)

Racial segregation drives disparities in COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses
Across the US, COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses are lowest in primarily white counties. They follow the same pattern, with diagnoses decreasing as the population of white residents in these counties increases. (2020-08-26)

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