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Current Pelvic Organ Prolapse News and Events, Pelvic Organ Prolapse News Articles.
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RUDN University doctors suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients
A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues had studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition. (2020-10-14)

IPK scientists discover gene that ensures slim inflorescence shape of barley
The inflorescences of grasses often have very different shapes. An international research team led by IPK has now succeeded in identifying a gene that plays a decisive role in ensuring that barley develops its characteristic slender inflorescences, called spikes. Compared to other grasses, the COMPOSITUM1 (COM1) gene has acquired a new function during grass evolution. The results have today been published in Nature Communications magazine. (2020-10-12)

More than 40% of women suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth
Women are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth than at any other time in their life, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-10-09)

Hearts harvested from pigs may soon help solve chronic shortages of these donor organs
An analysis discusses scientific breakthroughs that have overcome obstacles to cardiac xenotransplantation. (2020-10-07)

Are organ transplant recipients at greater risk of death from COVID-19?
A new study analyzes death risk from COVID-19 in organ transplant recipients and finds one treatment method greatly increased the risk. (2020-10-01)

Wasp egg-laying organ inspires new tool to reduce trauma in minimally invasive surgery
A new surgery tool based on the egg-laying organ of parasitic wasps could advance minimally invasive surgery by enabling tissue removal in deeper areas of the body while further minimising trauma and patient recovery time. Researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands based their prototype on the ovipositor of wasps, an ultra-thin flexible organ, which uses friction forces generated by sliding internal blades to achieve efficient transport on a small scale. (2020-09-30)

The heat is on for building 3D artificial organ tissues
Bioengineers have devised a technology that uses heat to remotely control the positioning and timing of cell functions to build 3-dimensional, artificial, living tissues. They designed 3-D printed fluid systems to supply penetrating heat, which allows them to manipulate the genetic wiring of cells deep in artificial tissues. Their vision for the future is to try to find ways to direct cells to form complex artificial organs that assume some functions of damaged livers. (2020-09-30)

High-fibre diet, low level inflammation: sidestepping the effects of radiation
Loved or hated, the humble oat could be the new superfood for cancer patients as international research shows a diet rich in fibre could significantly reduce radiation-induced gut inflammation. (2020-09-29)

New discovery helps researchers rethink organoid cultures
Organoids are stem cell-based tissue surrogates that can mimic the structure and function of organs, and they have become a key component of numerous types of medical research in recent years. But researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have uncovered problems with the conventional method for growing organoids for common experiments that may cause misleading results. (2020-09-29)

The Josep Carreras Institute identifies a marker of poor evolution in Hodgkin's lymphoma
Dr. Manel Esteller, director of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, published today in Blood journal, the discovery of a marker that allows predicting which patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma will present the aggressive clinical course, and will therefore be a case of special risk. (2020-09-15)

100-million-year-old amber reveals sexual intercourse of ostracods
Dr. WANG He and Prof. WANG Bo, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS), and their collaborators presented exceptionally well-preserved ostracods with soft parts (appendages and reproductive organs) from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber (~100 million years old), which revealed sexual intercourse of ostracods. (2020-09-15)

New research in JNCCN sheds light on multi-organ adverse events from immunotherapy
New international research in the September 2020 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds immunotherapy-related adverse events (irAEs) can impact more than one organ in a single patient. Multi-organ irAEs are more likely to happen sequentially rather than simultaneously. (2020-09-08)

New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution. The scientists Kenji Fukushima and David D. Pollock report this finding in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-08)

Skeletal study suggests at least 11 fish species are capable of walking
An international team of scientists has identified at least 11 species of fish suspected to have land-walking abilities. (2020-09-08)

Rejuvenating old organs could increase donor pool
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are leading efforts to breathe new life into older organs by leveraging a new class of drugs known as senolytics, which target and eliminate old cells. (2020-08-27)

Study of Asia's hillstream loaches reveals keys to fish family's land-walking abilities
A new genetic and morphological study of South Asia's hillstream loach (Balitoridae) family is shedding new light on the fishes' unusual land-walking capabilities, including that of the family's strangest relative -- Cryptotora thamicola -- a rare, blind cavefish from Thailand with an uncanny ability to walk on land and climb waterfalls using four limbs that move in salamander-like fashion. (2020-08-26)

Immune response to Sars-Cov-2 following organ transplantation
Even patients with suppressed immune systems can achieve a strong immune response to Sars-Cov-2. A test helps to adapt therapy following an infection. (2020-08-17)

Montana State researcher featured in Nature for work on rare reptile genome
Chris Organ worked with an international group of scientists to sequence the genome of the tuatara, a reptile found only in New Zealand with an evolutionary history stretching back 250 million years. (2020-08-14)

Exploring connections between ovarian cancer and blood cells
Recent discoveries made by researchers at Texas A&M University could change the way ovarian cancer is understood and treated. (2020-08-14)

Radiation to treat pediatric cancers may have lasting impact on heart and metabolic health
Adult survivors of childhood abdominal and pelvic cancers who had been treated with radiation therapy experienced abnormalities in body composition and had worse cardiometabolic health compared with the general population. (2020-08-13)

Sex, flies and videotape
Researchers discover key behaviour that triggers the transition from courtship to mating in fruit flies. (2020-08-13)

The larynx has evolved more rapidly in primates
The larynx is larger, more variable in size, and has undergone faster rates of evolution in primates than in carnivores, according to a study published August 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daniel Bowling of Stanford University, W. Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna, and colleagues. (2020-08-13)

Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity
Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity in this species, according to a study published August 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hanae Pouillevet of Oniris Nantes-Atlantic National College of Veterinary Medicine, and colleagues. (2020-08-12)

Why does COVID-19 impact only some organs, not others?
In severe cases of COVID-19, damage can spread beyond the lungs and into other organs, such as the heart, liver, kidney and parts of the neurological system. Beyond these specific sets of organs, however, the virus seems to lack impact. Ernesto Estrada aimed to uncover an explanation as to how it is possible for these damages to propagate selectively rather than affecting the entire body. He discusses his findings in the journal Chaos. (2020-08-11)

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace
Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals. (2020-08-11)

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour. (2020-08-10)

Scientists suggest device to make breast MRI more effective
Magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly popular as a method of diagnosing diseases. Standard scanners are multifunctional, making it possible to cut down on the costs of specialized equipment. On the other hand, this leads to images of lower quality, especially when relatively small areas need to be examined. A group of Russian scientists, including ITMO University researchers, has proposed a system that can be used to update existing MRI scanners. It will allow conducting breast MRI using standard scanners without specialized equipment. (2020-08-04)

Immune functions traded in for reproductive success
Researchers at the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, and the University of Washington in Seattle, USA, for the first time, investigate the phenomenon of sexual parasitism in deep-sea anglerfish. The scientists show that this very rare mode of reproduction is associated with the loss of adaptive immunity. In the course of evolution, however, the animals have reorganized their immune systems and only survive with the help of their innate immunity. (2020-07-30)

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found. (2020-07-24)

Kidney transplantation between people with HIV is safe, NIH study finds
Kidney transplantation from deceased donors with HIV to people living with both HIV and end-stage kidney disease is feasible and safe, investigators supported by the National Institutes of Health have found. Their study demonstrates that the pool of available kidneys for people with HIV can be expanded by including donors with HIV, making more kidneys available for all who are awaiting a transplant. (2020-07-23)

New hope for kidney revival for transplant
Cell therapy delivered directly to the kidney can revive a 'marginal' organ, improving function and could offer new hope for providing more kidneys for transplant. (2020-07-14)

Human lungs rejected for transplant recovered using novel technique
A multidisciplinary team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Columbia University has demonstrated that injured human donor lungs declined for transplant can be recovered by cross-circulation between the human lung and a xenogeneic host. (2020-07-13)

New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation. (2020-07-10)

Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The team followed more than 2,000 women for three years after they delivered their first child. (2020-07-09)

Hyperactive immune cells accelerate heart valve disease: Study
Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of heart valve disease in the elderly and affects more than one in eight people aged over 75. Researchers used organ-on-a-chip technology to discover the disease is made worse by the damaging hyperactivity of immune cells, which are activated by the constant stress of squeezing through the narrow aortic valve. (2020-07-08)

Order from noise: How randomness and collective dynamics define a stem cell
Without stem cells, human life would not exist. Due to them, a lump of cells becomes an organ, and a fertilized egg develops into a baby. But what actually makes a stem cell? Are these a stable population of specially gifted cells? Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered that instead, stem cells might emerge due to the collective behavior of cells within the organs. (2020-07-06)

Location, location, location -- Even gut immune response is site-specific
Researchers at W├╝rzburg University are using mini-organs to model the digestive tract in the laboratory. These so-called organoids provide insights into the inflammatory processes that play a role in diseases such Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. (2020-07-03)

Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells
Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of 'pancreatic slices' to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time. (2020-07-01)

Rutgers co-leads first nationwide study of COVID-19 related multiple inflammatory syndrome
Parents and clinicians need to be aware in looking for symptoms of multiple inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) in children who have been diagnosed or exposed to COVID-19. (2020-06-30)

Ladder falls have long-lasting consequences for older blokes
In the world's first study of long-term impacts from ladder falls, Queensland researchers have found half of fallers experience a deterioration in their psychological wellbeing for at least six months after the incident. (2020-06-28)

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