Current Peptides News and Events

Current Peptides News and Events, Peptides News Articles.
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Researchers reveal genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19
HSE University researchers have become the first in the world to discover genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19. The results of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.641900 (2021-02-23)

Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-02-22)

Tricking the novel coronavirus with a fake "handshake"
Fool the novel coronavirus once and it can't cause infection of cells, new research suggests. Scientists have developed protein fragments, called peptides, that bind to the virus's Spike protein, effectively tricking SARS-CoV-2 into ''shaking hands'' with a replica rather than with the receptor that lets the virus into a cell. (2021-02-22)

Cone snail venom shows potential for treating severe malaria
Using venom from a cone snail, a first-of-its-kind study suggests these conotoxins may potentially treat malaria. The study provides important leads toward the development of new and cost-effective anti-adhesion or blockade-therapy drugs aimed at counteracting the pathology of severe malaria. Similarly, mitigation of emerging diseases like COVID-19 also could benefit from conotoxins as potential inhibitors of protein-protein interactions as treatment. Venom peptides from cone snails has the potential to treat myriad diseases using blockage therapies. (2021-02-18)

A peptide that inhibits virus transmission among ferrets may point to a promising treatment
An engineered peptide given to ferrets two days before they were co-housed with SARS-CoV-2-infected animals prevented virus transmission to the treated ferrets, a new study shows. (2021-02-17)

First test for all known human coronaviruses, including new SARS-CoV-2 variants
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and SunYat-Sen University in China have set the stage for the development of highly sensitive antibody tests for infection with all known human coronaviruses, including new variants of SARS-CoV-2. These tests should also allow differentiation of immune responses due to infection and vaccination. The research is published in Communications Biology, a Nature journal. (2021-02-16)

Collagen structures get the royal reveal
An algorithm by Rice University scientists predicts the structures and melting temperatures of collagen, the triple helix that accounts for about a third of the body's proteins and forms the fibrous glue in skin, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments. (2021-02-15)

New synthetic peptides could attenuate atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis, a lipid-triggered chronic inflammatory disease of our arteries, is the main cause of strokes and heart attacks. An international team of researchers led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the LMU University Hospital has developed novel synthetic peptides that can help to prevent atherosclerosis in vitro, that is in the test tube, as well as in animal models. (2021-02-12)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

The therapeutic potential of peptides
There are more than 80 peptide drugs on the global market and about twice as many in clinical development. Due to their beneficial properties, these biomolecules play already an important role in the treatment of diseases. In Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, a team of Austrian and Australian scientists led by Markus Muttenthaler of the University of Vienna present an outlook on the latest trends in peptide drug discovery and development. (2021-02-10)

Brain protein that causes Alzheimer's also protects against the disease: USask research
Findings from a new study on Alzheimer's disease (AD), led by researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (USask), could eventually help clinicians identify people at highest risk for developing the irreversible, progressive brain disorder and pave the way for treatments that slow or prevent its onset. (2021-02-08)

Immune response to insulin could identify, help treat those at risk for Type 1 Diabetes
Researchers from the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that immune responses to insulin could help identify individuals most at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes. (2021-02-08)

Study: 'Hidden' genes could be key in development of new antibiotics
A study from the Center for Phage Technology, part of Texas A&M's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Texas A&M AgriLife Research, shows how the ''hidden'' genes in bacteriophages -- types of viruses that infect and destroy bacteria -- may be key to the development of a new class of antibiotics for human health. (2021-02-05)

Biobased anti-thrombosis agent
Thrombosis, the clogging of blood vessels, is a major cause of heart attacks and embolism. Scientists have now engineered the first inhibitors of thrombin, a protease promoting thrombosis, that is three-fold efficient. In a study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors demonstrate that attacking three sites of the thrombin molecule is more efficient than attacking only two sites, which is the mode of action of many natural agents. (2021-01-29)

Technology bolsters use of chia seeds to help improve health, slow signs of aging
A Purdue University team has developed and patented a method to separate mucilage from chia seeds, yielding a protein-rich chia seed flour with improved bioactivity and functionality compared with conventional methods. (2021-01-28)

Researchers develop promising way to find new cancer drugs
The enzymes in human cells known as histone deacetylases, or HDACs, are targets for a handful of anticancer drugs because of their ability to affect gene expression. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method to investigate how these enzymes work on a molecular level. This new method can also help identify more precise possible anti-cancer drug candidates at a very high pace. (2021-01-25)

Inflamed environment is C. diff paradise
A new study shows that the inflammation caused by Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) infection gives the pathogen a two-fold advantage: by both creating an inhospitable environment for competing bacteria and providing nutrients that enable C. diff to thrive. (2021-01-19)

BIO Integration journal, Volume 1, Issue number 4, publishes
BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 4, Publishes Guangzhou, January 15, 2021: New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) publishes its fourth issue, volume 1, issue 4. (2021-01-15)

Moffitt researchers discover biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis
In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis. (2021-01-14)

Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria
Researchers at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire the development of novel synthetic drugs to combat bacterial infections (2021-01-14)

Antibiotic resistance from random DNA sequences
An important and still unanswered question is how new genes that cause antibiotic resistance arise. In a new study, Swedish and American researchers have shown how new genes that produce resistance can arise from completely random DNA sequences. The results have been published in the journal PLOS Genetics. (2021-01-08)

Protein that can be toxic in the heart and nerves may help prevent Alzheimer's
A protein that wreaks havoc in the nerves and heart when it clumps together can prevent the formation of toxic protein clumps associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new study led by a UT Southwestern researcher shows. The findings, published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to new treatments for this brain-ravaging condition, which currently has no truly effective therapies and no cure. (2021-01-07)

Resist the resistance: fighting the good fight against bacteria
Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathogen without damaging the good bacteria that bolsters the immune system. (2021-01-06)

Enhanced scorpion venom molecules can be used to treat Chagas disease
Brazilian researchers tested the antichagasic properties of VmCT1, obtained from the venom of Vaejovis mexicanus, a scorpion harmless to humans, and synthesized novel analogs to redesign the native molecule (2020-12-21)

Natural antibiotics produced in wounds increase sleep and survival after injury
When wounded, our body sets off a complex immune response. As part of it, the wound produces small antimicrobial molecules to fight off the pathogens locally. Researchers from the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) of the TU Dresden and Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in collaboration with the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy (CIML) in France have found that these natural antibiotics can also act as long-range molecular messengers. (2020-12-09)

Sous vide cooking method makes beef protein more digestible
Once used to prepare cuisine in only the finest restaurants, sous vide is now making its way into home chefs' kitchens. French for 'under vacuum,' the technique involves vacuum sealing food in a plastic pouch and then slowly cooking it in warm water. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found that, compared with boiling or roasting, sous vide increases beef protein digestibility during simulated digestion. (2020-12-09)

Development of a new method for decoding viral genes
A research team led by Professor Yasushi Kawaguchi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, developed a new decoding method for viral genes that can easily and quickly obtain even non-canonical genetic information. Using this new decoding method, they identified nine novel proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) and found that one of them, piUL49, is a pathogenic factor that specifically controls the onset of herpes encephalitis . (2020-12-07)

Useful 'fake' peptides
Some useful drugs consist of peptides acting on their protein targets. To make them more efficient and stable, scientists have found a way to replace crucial segments of the peptides with ureido units. These oligoureas, which are composed of urea-based units, fold into a structure similar to that of peptides. Oligourea-based 'fake' peptides enhance the options for rational drug design, concludes the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-12-07)

Team uses copper to image Alzheimer's aggregates in the brain
A proof-of-concept study conducted in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease offers new evidence that copper isotopes can be used to detect the amyloid-beta protein deposits that form in the brains of people living with -- or at risk of developing -- Alzheimer's. (2020-11-24)

Researchers identify genetics behind deadly oat blight
A multi-institution team co-led by a Cornell University researcher has identified the genetic mechanisms that enable the production of a deadly toxin called Victorin - the causal agent for Victoria blight of oats, a disease that wiped out oat crops in the U.S. in the 1940s. (2020-11-23)

Antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Zhong, Cuiyu; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jiandong; Huang, Songyin; Yao, Yandan from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Guangzhou Regenerative Medicine and Health Guangdong Laboratory, Guangzhou, China and Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Guangdong, China review antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties. (2020-11-19)

Liver condition identified in patients using urine samples: new research
Fifty fragments of proteins, termed peptides, have been identified in the urine of liver fibrosis patients in a new study that could pave the way for a potential diagnostic urine test for the condition if further validated. (2020-11-16)

Cysteine synthesis was a key step in the origin of life
All proteins are built from the same 20 amino acids. One of these, cysteine, was assumed not to have been present at the origin of life. In a new study, published in Science, UCL scientists have recreated how cysteine was formed at the origins of life. Additionally, they have observed how, once formed, cysteine catalyses the fusion of peptides in water - a fundamental step in the path towards protein enzymes. (2020-11-12)

Folding proteins feel the heat, and cold
A new study shows proteins that presumably evolved to avoid water as they fold may actually behave in ways scientists did not anticipate. (2020-11-11)

Beetroot peptide as potential drug candidate for treating diseases
In a recent study, a research group led by Christian Gruber at MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology isolated a peptide (small protein molecule) from beetroot. The peptide is able to inhibit a particular enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of messenger molecules in the body. Due to its particularly stable molecular structure and pharmacological properties, the beetroot peptide may be a good candidate for development of a drug to treat certain inflammatory diseases, such as e.g. neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. (2020-10-30)

TalTech chemists' new method is a significant step towards greener pharmaceutical industry
The rapid changes in the chemical industry are connected one hand with the depletion of natural resources and deepening of environmental concerns, on the other hand with the growth of environmental awareness. Green, environmentally friendly chemistry is playing an increasingly important role in the sustainable chemical industry. (2020-10-27)

Peptides+antibiotic combination may result in a more effective treatment for leishmaniasis
A combination of peptides and antibiotics could be key to eliminating the parasite causing leishmaniasis and avoiding the toxicity to people and animals caused by current drugs. The study, coordinated by researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona opens the door to new, more effective treatments against this disease. (2020-10-16)

DNA-peptide interactions create complex behaviours which may have helped shape biology
DNA and proteins are two fundamental biochemical polymers found in all living cells. They are very different in terms of their molecular properties: DNA is a remarkably homogenous polymer in terms of its molecular properties, while proteins can be extremely heterogeneous with regard to these properties. New research suggests the intrinsic ways that DNA and proteins interact at molecular level can lead to extremely diverse behaviours that may helped shape important aspects of modern biology. (2020-10-14)

Protein that keeps immune system from freaking out could form basis for new therapeutics
Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study. (2020-10-14)

Scientists develop new precise therapeutic leukemia vaccine
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University have developed a new type of precise therapeutic vaccine against leukemia. It utilizes self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules for co-encapsulating a new epitope peptide and PD-1 antibody. (2020-10-12)

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