Current Perception News and Events

Current Perception News and Events, Perception News Articles.
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Gay men who 'sound gay' encounter more stigma and discrimination from heterosexual peers
Gay men are more likely than lesbian women to face stigma and avoidant prejudice from their heterosexual peers due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the British Journal of Social Psychology reports. Researchers also found that gay men who believe they sound gay anticipate stigma and are more vigilant regarding the reactions of others. (2021-02-23)

A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this is the first time it has been used to study the perception of satiety (2021-02-22)

Ultraviolet 'television' for animals helps us better understand them
University of Queensland scientists have developed an ultraviolet 'television' display designed to help researchers better understand how animals see the world. (2021-02-18)

How comparable different stress tests are
Scientists use many different tests to investigate what happens in the brain in people experiencing stress. It is unclear to what extent the various methods with which subjects are placed under stress are comparable to each other. In a meta-analysis, researchers compared 31 previous studies that had investigated stress using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The team worked out which regions of the brain are activated as standard during stress and which stress tests trigger similar activation patterns. (2021-02-12)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

Time perception and sense of touch: a new connection
The percept of time relates to the sense of touch. A new SISSA study ''A sensory integration account for time perception'' published in PLOS Computational Biology uncovers this connection. The main clue leading to the new theory is that the perceived duration of a vibration increases not only in relation to actual elapsed time but also in relation to the intensity of the vibration. (2021-02-10)

Object transparency reduces human perception of three-dimensional shapes
Toyohashi University of Technology discovered that when people judge the thickness of an object, objects with glass-like transparent optical properties are perceived to be flatter than they actually are. This discover may be useful for everyday applications, such as devices to assist with walking in people with low-vision or autonomous driving. (2021-02-10)

Link found between time perception, risk for developmental coordination disorder
Neuroscientists at McMaster University have found a link between children who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a common condition that can cause clumsiness, and difficulties with time perception such as interpreting changes in rhythmic beats. (2021-02-05)

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Alternate type of surgery may prevent total knee replacement
An underused type of knee surgery in younger patients, called high tibial osteotomy, shows considerable success in reducing the need for total knee replacement, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200934. (2021-02-01)

Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper. (2021-01-28)

'Aging well' greatly affected by hopes and fears for later life, OSU study finds
If you believe you are capable of becoming the healthy, engaged person you want to be in old age, you are much more likely to experience that outcome, a recent Oregon State University study shows. (2021-01-21)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

High levels of clinician burnout identified at leading cardiac centre
More than half the clinicians surveyed at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre reported burnout and high levels of distress according to a series of studies published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open (CMAJ-OPEN). In the studies carried out before the COVID-19 pandemic, 78% of nurses, 73% of allied health staff and 65% of physicians described experiencing burnout. (2021-01-12)

How anorexia nervosa alters body awareness
People with anorexia nervosa have a distorted relationship with the dimensions of their body. A study by the team at the Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at LWL University Hospital at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has shown that, in addition to the conscious body image, what is known as the body schema - unconscious body awareness - is also distorted. It normally adapts to the current situation. (2021-01-12)

Perceptions of police using PPE during the pandemic - SFU study
A Simon Fraser University study on public perceptions of police officers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during the current pandemic finds that most PPE renders positive perceptions of police, while some equipment, including full-face respirator masks, may be viewed more negatively. (2021-01-12)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

Study explains role of bone-conducted speech transmission in speech production and hearing
The perception of our own voice depends on sound transmission through air (air-conducted) as well as through the skull bone (bone-conducted or BC). The transmission properties of BC speech are, however, not well understood. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report their latest findings on BC transmission under the influence of oral cavity sound pressure, which can boost BC-based technology and basic research on hearing loss and speech impairment. (2021-01-07)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

Do I know you? Researchers evaluate how masks disrupt facial perception
The researchers found that the success rate of identifying someone wearing a mask was reduced by 15%. ''This could lead to many errors in correctly recognizing people we know, or alternatively, accidently recognizing faces of unfamiliar face as people we know,'' says Prof. Galia Avidan who is a member of the BGU Department of Psychology and the Department of Cognitive and Brain Sciences, and an expert on facial recognition and perception. (2020-12-21)

New research shows masks change the way we process faces
New study finds that our ability to recognize faces is severely impaired by masks, and this decreased face perception is impacting our social interactions with others. (2020-12-21)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
Although many studies have found that humans benefit from spending time in nature, few studies have explored why. Researchers hid speakers that played recorded songs from a diverse group of birds on two sections of trails in Colorado. Hikers who heard the bird songs reported a greater sense of well-being than those who didn't. The survey results showed that both the sounds themselves and people's perception of biodiversity can increase humans' feelings of well-being. (2020-12-15)

Create a realistic VR experience using a normal 360-degree camera
Scientists at the University of Bath have developed a quick and easy approach for capturing 360° VR photography without using expensive specialist cameras. The system uses a commercially available 360° camera on a rotating selfie stick to capture video footage and create an immersive VR experience. (2020-12-14)

Accent perception depends on backgrounds of speaker, listener
Visual cues can change listeners' perception of others' accents, and people's past exposure to varied speech can also impact their perception of accents. Ethan Kutlu will discuss his team's work testing the impact that visual input and linguistic diversity has on listeners' perceived accentedness judgments in two different locations: Gainesville, Florida, and Montreal, Canada. The session will take place Dec. 9 as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-09)

Brain clears the way for binocular vision even before eyes are open
The brain architecture of binocular vision is laid down even before a young mouse's eyes are open. About half of the chandelier cells, so-named because they have many long extensions that control the firing of hundreds of excitatory pyramidal neurons, are selectively pruned from the developing mouse visual cortex by a process of programmed cell death called apoptosis. (2020-12-07)

High-definition brain prosthesis demonstrates artificial shape perception in monkeys
An implant packed with more than 1000 tiny, brain-stimulating electrodes generates recognizable perceptions of motion and complex shapes - including letters of the alphabet - in a monkey's mind. (2020-12-03)

Adults with overweight or obesity often don't recognize they have a weight problem
A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data found that more than 40% of U.S. adults with overweight and nearly 10% with obesity did not consider themselves to be overweight. This trend has increased over the last two decades and was especially true of non-Hispanic Blacks and persons with low socioeconomic status. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Psychological factors contributing to language learning
Motivation for language learning is a system of cognitive, emotional, and personality-related characteristics. (2020-11-25)

Barriers to police investigations into widespread financial crime unveiled
A majority of police detectives in England and Wales investigating financial crime do not have sufficient knowledge to build a successful case. That's the finding of new research from the University of Portsmouth, looking into why results of such investigations vary so widely, especially when the crimes account for half of all criminal activity in the UK. (2020-11-24)

Rhythm and bleughs: changes in our stomach's rhythms steer us away from disgusting sights
Does the sight of maggots squirming in rotten food make you look away in disgust? The phrase 'makes my stomach turn' takes on a new meaning today as researchers at the University of Cambridge reveal that changes in the rhythm of our stomachs prompt us to look away from disgusting images. (2020-11-24)

Research shows the intrinsically nonlinear nature of receptive fields in vision
According to a study led by Marcelo Bertalmío, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, published in the journal of the group Nature, Scientific Reports, which proposes a paradigm shift for both vision science and for artificial intelligence. (2020-11-23)

Upgraded radar can enable self-driving cars to see clearly no matter the weather
A new kind of radar could make it possible for self-driving cars to navigate safely in bad weather. Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a clever way to improve the imaging capability of existing radar sensors so that they accurately predict the shape and size of objects in the scene. The system worked well when tested at night and in foggy conditions. (2020-11-17)

Re-mapping taste in the brain
A new study from Stony Brook University found that the map of neural responses mediating taste perception does not involve, as previously believed, specialized groups of neurons in the brain, but rather overlapping and spatially distributed populations. (2020-11-12)

Optoelectronic detectors capable of perceiving light intensity and color
Current optoelectronic detectors are only able to perceive light intensities. Although multi-photosensor spectrometers are capable of perceiving intensity and colour, they require chip-level assembly and can generate redundant signals. Scientists in China have created a low cost, flexible device consists of a photoactive layer made from a semiconductor with a small bandgap and a photosensing layer made from a semiconductor with gradient bandgaps, which is capable of detecting light intensity and perceiving colour. (2020-11-11)

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling. (2020-11-10)

Why do bats fly into walls?
Bats sometimes collide with large walls even though they detect these walls with their sonar system. Researchers from Tel Aviv University have concluded that these collisions do not result from a sensory limitation but rather from an error in acoustic perception. (2020-11-09)

Intelligent cameras enhance human perception
A team of FAU researchers has developed an intelligent camera that achieves not only high spatial and temporal but also spectral resolution. The camera has a wide range of applications that can improve environmental protection and resource conservation measures as well as autonomous driving or modern agriculture. (2020-11-02)

Dull-colored birds don't see the world like colorful birds do
Bengalese finches -- also called the Society finch -- are a species of brown, black and white birds that don't rely on colorful signals when choosing a mate. Consequently, when presented with a color-perception test that their bright red-beaked cousins the Zebra finches routinely ace, they seem to be paying more attention to differences in brightness than hue. (2020-10-28)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

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