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Current Perception News and Events, Perception News Articles.
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Virtual reality could be used to treat autism
Playing games in virtual reality (VR) could be a key tool in treating people with neurological disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. (2019-03-28)
How to make self-driving cars safer on roads
At USC, researchers have published a new study that tackles a long-standing problem for autonomous vehicle developers: testing the system's perception algorithms, which allow the car to 'understand' what it 'sees.' (2019-03-28)
Time maps: How our brain perceives time
What happens in our brain when we listen to the rhythmic pace of a song or when, at the traffic light, the light is red and we are trembling awaiting the green? (2019-03-22)
Girls need more positive experiences of ball skills
Children have high perceptions of motor skills. Some gender differences were identified: girls better in locomotor skills, boys have higher perception and actual skills in ball skills. (2019-03-21)
How attention helps the brain perceive an object
The ability of the brain to ignore extraneous visual information is critical to how we work and function, but the processes governing perception and attention are not fully understood. (2019-03-19)
Infants' advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link
A new Northwestern University study provides the first evidence that infants' increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition. (2019-03-13)
Fear center in the brain protects against illusions
If functionality of the brain's amygdala is impaired, illusory perceptions arise much faster and more pronounced. (2019-03-12)
Mayo Clinic study: Sleep apnea may be tied to increased Alzheimer's biomarker in brain
People who stop breathing during sleep may have higher accumulations of the toxic protein tau, a biological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, in part of the brain that manages memory, navigation and perception of time. (2019-03-03)
The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy
The smell of food affects physiology and aging. That is the result of research conducted on the model organism of the roundworm by a research team led by Professor Thorsten Hoppe at the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD). (2019-02-20)
Study suggests lazy eye associated with children's sense of self-perception
This observational study looked at whether the condition known as 'lazy eye' (amblyopia) was associated with an altered sense of self-perception in children (ages 3 to 7) and whether any differences in self-perception were associated with deficiencies in vision and fine motor skills like coordination. (2019-02-14)
Risk analysis releases special issue on the social science of automated driving
Risk Analysis, An International Journal has published a special issue, 'Social Science of Automated Driving,' which features several articles examining the human side of automated driving, focusing on questions about morality, the role of feeling, trust and risk perceptions. (2019-02-14)
Surrounded by low achievers -- High on positive emotions?
Study involving the University of Konstanz proves negative impacts of high-achieving environment on school students' individual emotional well-being. (2019-02-11)
Stock market shows greater reaction to forecasts by analysts with favorable surnames
Financial analysts whose surnames are perceived as favorable elicit stronger market reactions to their earnings forecasts, new research from Cass Business School has found. (2019-02-06)
Engineers build a soft robotics perception system inspired by humans
An international team of researchers has developed a perception system for soft robots inspired by the way humans process information about their own bodies in space and in relation to other objects and people. (2019-01-30)
How our brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others
Our brains seem to reduce sensory perception from an area of our skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University, Sweden, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS. (2019-01-21)
Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease
A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that an investigational nonsteroidal topical cream (PAC-14028) may be effective for treating atopic dermatitis, one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases. (2019-01-09)
Study suggests that fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals
The emotional underpinnings of political ideology motivated how the electorate sought and processed information about the 2016 presidential election and the major issue of climate change. (2019-01-09)
Myth of Mona Lisa's magical gaze debunked
In science, the ''Mona Lisa Effect'' refers to the impression that the eyes of the person portrayed in an image seem to follow the viewer as they move in front of the picture. (2019-01-08)
Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence
We are exposed to the facial expressions of the people. (2018-12-21)
Is the US a tinderbox ready to ignite?
What is the tipping point at which tolerance for hardship and injustice turns into civic discontent in the form of street demonstrations, and how it might be closer than it seems. (2018-12-20)
Using endangered barbary macaques as photo props could negatively impact Moroccan tourism
Wild animals are increasingly exploited for entertainment and photo opportunities. (2018-12-18)
Tuning arousal to boost information transmission in the brain
Columbia neural engineers discover a mechanism by which the locus coeruleus modulates information processing in the thalamus; their findings of how sensory information is encoded in the healthy brain may lead to new treatments of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, and depression. (2018-12-17)
Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality
When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself (2018-12-14)
Video game players frequently exposed to graphic content may see world differently
Disturbing imagery disrupts perception, but not as much among violent video game players, UNSW Sydney psychologists have shown. (2018-12-13)
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. (2018-12-12)
Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in brain independently of one another
Pain is a negative feeling that we want to get rid of. (2018-12-12)
When scientists push people to their tipping point
You probably overestimate just how far someone can push you before you reach your tipping point, new research suggests. (2018-12-10)
Utility customers overestimate cost savings with energy-conservation plans
When deciding whether to participate in programs designed to conserve energy during peak hours, consumers appear to rely more on their intuition about how much money they're saving rather than on proof their bills are smaller, a new study has found. (2018-12-03)
Stop -- hey, what's that sound?
In a new study, researchers were able to see where in the brain, and how quickly -- in milliseconds -- the brain's neurons transition from processing the sound of speech to processing the language-based words of the speech. (2018-11-29)
Music supports the auditory skills of hearing-impaired children
Researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland, and University College London have found evidence that children with hearing impairment and cochlear implants can benefit from hobbies involving music and especially singing. (2018-11-27)
Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do
The more sensitive people are to the bitter taste of caffeine, the more coffee they drink, reports a new study. (2018-11-15)
Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion
The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. (2018-11-15)
Does having 'lazy eye' affect a child's self-esteem?
Academic performance, interactions with peers, and athletic ability are factors connected to self-esteem in school children. (2018-11-15)
Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field
A Dartmouth study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. (2018-11-08)
New glimpses into brain uncover neurological basis for processing social information
Neuroscientists are developing a clearer picture than ever before of how the animal brain processes social information, from status and competitive advantage in a group to the calls and vocalizations of peers. (2018-11-04)
Microplastics in food -- Many unanswered questions among scientists and the general public
Although overall 75 percent of the population regard food as safe, more and more Germans are showing concern about microplastics in food. (2018-10-31)
Suicide more prevalent than homicide in US, but most Americans don't know it
A new study by the University of Washington, Northeastern University and Harvard University delves into public perceptions of gun violence and the leading causes of death in the US. (2018-10-30)
How LSD changes perception
LSD changes the communication patterns between regions of the brain, a new study by researchers of the University of Zurich and Yale University shows. (2018-10-30)
Research supports the ump, distance to a close play is critical in making the right call
New research from Arizona State University is showing that when it comes to the bang-bang plays in baseball viewing distance from the play is critical for judging what actually happened. (2018-10-23)
Scientists find brain signal that might help us judge the holiday buffet
Neuroscientists have found a brain region that appears to be strongly connected to food preference decisions, like what to choose from a buffet line or potluck table. (2018-10-19)
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