Current Periodic Table News and Events

Current Periodic Table News and Events, Periodic Table News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

Optical frequency combs found a new dimension
Scientists from EPFL and IBM Research Europe have demonstrated the generation of tunable and coherent frequency combs in a pair of hybridised optical microresonators. (2021-02-20)

RUDN University chemist used iodine to synthesize new chalcogenides
A chemist from RUDN University, working with a group of colleagues, synthesized three new chalcogenides (compounds that contain metals and elements from group 16 of the periodic table). The team suggested an unusual approach to synthesis that was based on iodine. (2021-02-19)

Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

Experimental tests of relativistic chemistry will update the periodic table
Researchers from Osaka University used a particle accelerator and co-precipitation to study the chemical reactivity of single rutherfordium atoms. Such experiments will continue the advancement of relativistic chemistry that is pertinent to a range of applications including renewable energy and new materials. (2021-02-16)

Physicists have optimized the method of smelting the MAX phase
Physicists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University in collaboration with their foreign colleagues have optimized the method for obtaining highly pure Cr2AlC MAX-phase, which is necessary for studying the magnetic properties of this compound when it is doped with manganese. The unique properties of magnetic MAX materials could be used in a wide range of new technologies from magnetic cooling to spintronics. (2021-02-10)

Advanced simulations reveal how air conditioning spreads COVID-19 aerosols
A restaurant outbreak in China was widely reported as strong evidence of airflow-induced transmission of COVID-19, but it lacked a detailed investigation about exactly how transmission occurred. In Physics of Fluids, researchers at the University of Minnesota report using advanced simulation methods to capture the complex flows that occur when the cold airflow from air conditioners interacts with the hot plume from a dining table and the transport of virus-loading particles within such flows. (2021-02-09)

Scientists measure spectral line of Cherenkov radiation in radiant regime
The scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the colleagues from Keysight company have conducted an experiment with an electron beam at the TPU microtron to study a super-radiant regime that occurs when radiation is generated by a train of electron bunches. The research findings obtained by a high-precision measurement of a spectral line width proved that about 8,000 electron bunches in a super-radiant regime form monochromatic Cherenkov radiation. This experiment was conducted for the first time. (2021-02-07)

Grape consumption may protect against UV damage to skin
A recent human study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that consuming grapes protected against ultraviolet (UV) skin damage. Study subjects showed increased resistance to sunburn and a reduction in markers of UV damage at the cellular level. Natural components found in grapes known as polyphenols are thought to be responsible for these beneficial effects. (2021-02-05)

New microscopy concept enters into force
The first demonstration of an approach that inverts the standard paradigm of scanning probe microscopy raises the prospect of force sensing at the fundamental limit. (2021-02-05)

Charge radii of exotic potassium isotopes challenge nuclear structure theory
In nuclear physics so-called magic number are such nuclear proton and/or neutron numbers, for which the nucleus is more stable compared to neighboring isotopes on the nuclear chart. An international research team studied the nuclear charge radii of potassium isotopes. Isotopes were studied by using the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy technique. The results indicated that the potassium isotope with a neutron number of 32 does not conform with criteria of magic neutron number. The results were published in Nature Physics journal. (2021-02-04)

Large-area periodic perovskite nanostructures for lenticular printing laser displays
We fabricated large-area periodic structures with spatial resolution at wavelength scale from hybrid perovskite materials via a space-confined solution growth method. It takes advantages of both high refractive index contrast and high luminescence brightness, which allows the optical modulation on not only the reflection of illumination, but also the light emission from hybrid perovskites. The distributed feedback within these periodic structures significantly improves the degree of polarization and directionality of laser action while its threshold is also reduced. (2021-02-04)

Discoveries at the edge of the periodic table: first ever measurements of einsteinium
Since element 99 - einsteinium - was discovered in 1952 at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizing some of its properties, opening the door to a better understanding of the remaining transuranic elements of the actinide series. (2021-02-03)

Finding rare birds is never a picnic, contrary to popular Patagonia belief
One of birdwatching's most commonly held and colorfully named beliefs, the Patagonia Picnic Table Effect, is more a fun myth than a true phenomenon, Oregon State University research suggests. (2021-02-01)

Nuclear physicist's voyage towards a mythical island
Theories were introduced as far back as the 1960s about the possible existence of superheavy elements. Their most long-lived atomic nuclei could give rise to a so-called ''island of stability'' far beyond the element uranium. However, a new study, led by nuclear physicists at Lund University, shows that a 50-year-old nuclear physics manifesto must now be revised. (2021-01-26)

What's in a name? A new class of superconductors
A new theory that could explain how unconventional superconductivity arises in a diverse set of compounds might never have happened if physicists Qimiao Si and Emilian Nica had chosen a different name for their 2017 model of orbital-selective superconductivity. (2021-01-25)

A method for calculating optimal parameters of liquid chrystal displays developed at RUDN University
A professor from RUDN University together with his colleagues from Saratov Chernyshevsky State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia developed a method for calculating the parameters of diffraction optical elements used in LCDs. In particular, the new technology can be used to expand the angle of view while preserving high resolution and color rendition. (2021-01-22)

Could lab-grown plant tissue ease the environmental toll of logging and agriculture?
MIT researchers have proposed a method for growing plant-based materials, like wood and fiber, in a lab. The technology is still in early development but might one day help reduce the environmental footprint of some types of agriculture. (2021-01-21)

Teamwork in a molecule
Chemists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have demonstrated the value of 'teamwork' by successfully harnessing the interaction between two gallium atoms in a novel compound to split the particularly strong bond between fluorine and carbon. The gallium compound is also cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional alternatives. (2021-01-21)

Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Chemical Education introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elements much more approachable -- by using ''pseudo'' periodic tables filled with superheroes, foods and apps. (2021-01-13)

Researchers develop new one-step process for creating self-assembled metamaterials
A team led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers has discovered a groundbreaking one-step process for creating materials with unique properties, called metamaterials. (2021-01-11)

A charge-density-wave topological semimetal
A novel material has been discovered that is characterised by the coupling of a charge density wave with the topology of the electronic structure. (2021-01-09)

High-flux table-top source for femtosecond hard X-ray pulses
Researchers at the Max Born Institute (MBI) in Berlin have now accomplished a breakthrough in table-top generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses by demonstrating a stable pulse train at kilohertz repetition rate with a total flux of some 10^12 X-ray photons per second. (2021-01-07)

Scientists discover how mother-of-pearl self-assembles into a perfect structure
In a new study published in Nature Physics, researchers from the B CUBE - Center for Molecular Bioengineering at TU Dresden and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble describe, for the first time, that structural defects in self-assembling nacre attract and cancel each other out, eventually leading to a perfect periodic structure. (2021-01-04)

Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
Minerals are the most durable, information-rich objects we can study to understand our planet's origin and evolution. However, the current classification system leaves unanswered questions for planetary scientists, geobiologists, paleontologists and others who strive to understand minerals' historical context. A new evolutionary approach to classifying minerals complements the existing protocols and offers the opportunity to rigorously document Earth's history. (2020-12-21)

New type of atomic clock keeps time even more precisely
An MIT-designed atomic clock uses entangled atoms to keep time even more precisely than its state-of-the-art counterparts. The design could help scientists detect dark matter and study gravity's effect on time. (2020-12-16)

New, ultrastable tetrahedral "chiral zinc" added to synthetic chemistry toolbox
Researchers have designed and built a new chemical tool inspired by natural metal-containing enzymes in living organisms. The product, a tetrahedral ''chiral zinc'', maintains its shape for years, providing a new structure with exciting possibilities for manufacturing pharmaceuticals and optical electronics. (2020-12-15)

Scientists recruit new atomic heavyweights in targeted fight against cancer
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radiotracer for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy. (2020-12-14)

UMBC team reveals possibilities of new one-atom-thick materials
New 2D materials have the potential to transform technologies, but they're expensive and difficult to synthesize. Researchers at UMBC used computer modeling to predict the properties of 2D materials that haven't yet been made in real life. These highly-accurate predictions show the possibility of materials whose properties could be ''tuned'' to make them more efficient than existing materials in particular applications. A separate paper demonstrated a way to integrate these materials into real electronic devices. (2020-12-14)

Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals--including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds--follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology. (2020-12-11)

Researchers find a better way to design metal alloys
A system developed by MIT researchers uses machine learning to analyze boundaries between crystal grains, allowing for the selection of desired properties in a new metal alloy. (2020-12-11)

Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure. Jill Linz is working toward synthesizing unique tones for each element to create an acoustic version of the periodic table. She will discuss her progress and the potential applications of the project at the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10. (2020-12-10)

A comprehensive review of biosynthesis of inorganic nanomaterials using microorganisms and bacteriophages
A KAIST bioprocess engineering research team conducted a summary of 146 biosynthesized single and multi-element inorganic nanomaterials covering 55 elements in the periodic table synthesized using wild-type and genetically engineered microorganisms. Their research highlights the diverse applications of biogenic nanomaterials and gives strategies for improving the biosynthesis of nanomaterials in terms of their producibility, crystallinity, size, and shape. (2020-12-07)

Physicists capture the sound of a "perfect" fluid
MIT physicists have observed sound waves moving through a ''perfect'' fluid. The results should help scientists study the viscosity in neutron stars, the plasma of the early universe, and other strongly interacting fluids. (2020-12-03)

Pitt researchers create nanoscale slalom course for electrons
''We already know how to shoot electrons ballistically through one-dimensional nanowires made from these oxide materials,'' explains Levy. ''What is different here is that we have changed the environment for the electrons, forcing them to weave left and right as they travel. This motion changes the properties of the electrons, giving rise to new behavior.'' (2020-11-25)

Novel chemical process a first step to making nuclear fuel with fire
Developing safe and sustainable fuels for nuclear energy is an integral part of Los Alamos National Laboratory's energy security mission. (2020-11-24)

Ideal type-II Weyl points are observed in classical circuits
As one kind of elementary particles, Weyl fermions manifest themselves as Weyl points from dispersion relations. Although the type-II Weyl points with strongly tilted band structures have been observed in different systems, their ideal form where the Weyl points are symmetry-related and well-separated, and reside at the same energy and far from nontopological bands are never observed. Now scientist based in China and Singapore observe the ideal type-II Weyl points in classical circuits. (2020-11-24)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Carbyne - an unusual form of carbon
Which photophysical properties does carbyne have? This was the subject of research carried out by scientists at FAU, the University of Alberta, Canada, and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, which has led to a greater understanding of the properties of this unusual form of carbon. (2020-11-17)

Financial penalties imposed on large pharmaceutical firms for illegal activities
The UNC Charlotte study examined financial penalties imposed by government agencies using a sample of 26 large pharmaceutical firms over 13 years. Results indicated that 22 firms (85%) were penalized for illegal activities with most firms engaging in illegal activities for four or more years. Total penalties imposed during this period were $33 billion. The most common penalties were pricing violations, off-label marketing, and kickbacks. Four firms had no penalties assessed during the period. (2020-11-17)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.