Current Peripheral Neuropathy News and Events

Current Peripheral Neuropathy News and Events, Peripheral Neuropathy News Articles.
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Solving chronic pain during intercourse
Women suffering from chronic conditions that result in painful intercourse represent about 10% of females of reproductive age - triggering a combined economic burden of more than $7.7 billion per year - yet scant knowledge about the origins of this pain is preventing an effective way to treat it. (2021-02-04)

FGF23 hormone from red blood cell precursors promotes hematopoietic stem cell mobilization
A Kobe University research group have discovered that fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) produced by erythroblasts (cells that are the precursors of red blood cells) promotes the movement of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood. It is hoped that this discovery will enable new strategies to be developed for harvesting hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow transplant donors. (2021-01-18)

ADA lowers target HbA1C levels for children with type-1 diabetes
In early 2020, upon recommendation by leading endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association lowered the target hemoglobin A1C guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Their goal in recommending stricter glucose control was to ensure children with type 1 diabetes have better immediate and long-term health outcomes with fewer health complications and reduced mortality rates. In this ''Perspective'' article they discuss the evidence and rationale behind this new recommendation. (2021-01-14)

A subtle change in the DNA may predispose to polyneuropathy after gut infection
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a novel genetic variant associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). By analyzing the DNA sequence of patients with the disease, the researchers identified two novel variants of the ganglioside-binding protein Siglec-10 accumulated in the patients. They found that one of these variants impairs the function of the protein, predisposing carriers to the development of GBS. This study improves our understanding of the pathophysiology of GBS. (2021-01-07)

Mid-term clinical trial results show similar outcomes in promising cell therapies for CLI
Mid-term results of the first clinical trial designed specifically to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of two cell therapies that are showing early promise in treating angiitis-induced critical limb ischemia were released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine. (2021-01-05)

COVID-19-associated ocular neuropathy with panuveitis
A case of COVID-19 with severe ocular neuropathy and panuveitis (inflammation) is reported in this article. (2020-12-17)

CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. Researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%. (2020-12-16)

Low blood pressure during hemodialysis may indicate peripheral vascular disease
Using a large nationwide registry of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases found that higher frequency of low blood pressure episodes during hemodialysis was associated with a higher incidence of diagnosed peripheral arterial disease. (2020-12-11)

Single-eye gene therapy improves vision in both eyes of patients with inherited eye disorder
A gene therapy for an inherited eye disorder can ameliorate vision loss in both eyes despite only being injected into one, according to a phase 3 clinical trial involving 37 patients. (2020-12-09)

No mortality increase with paclitaxel-coated devices in peripheral arterial disease
An interim analysis from the Swedish Drug-Elution Trial in Peripheral Arterial Disease (SWEDEPAD) has now been presented. It shows that, for patients with lower limb occlusive arterial disease, paclitaxel-coated balloons and stents do not bring about the rise in mortality previously reported. The study, led by the University of Gothenburg and published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), is expected to resonate internationally. (2020-12-09)

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment. (2020-12-01)

Statins can save lives, are they being used?
People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke. (2020-12-01)

Link between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis
Rates of both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are elevated in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. New research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that immune responses to certain bacteria that cause periodontal disease may play a role in patients' higher cardiovascular disease risk. (2020-11-18)

Neurorehabilitation experts highlight breakthroughs in neurogenic pain management
There have been significant advances in knowledge regarding the pathology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of several significant neurogenic pain disorders regularly encountered by neurorehabilitation professionals in both inpatient and outpatient care. In a collection of articles published in NeuroRehabilitation, experts describe the latest advancements in neurogenic classification and pain management and treatment of these disorders. (2020-11-18)

Racial/ethnic minorities comprise small portion of patients referred with AL amyloidosis
Despite being theoretically at an increased risk for AL amyloidosis, underrepresented minorities make up only a small percentage of patients seen at specialized treatment centers for this disease. (2020-11-10)

Hydrogen sulfide helps maintain your drive to breathe
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that the production of hydrogen sulfide gas is necessary to breathe normally. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide production in rats prevented brain neurons that control breathing from functioning normally. These findings have identified new mediators of breathing that can now be explored in the context of human health and disease. (2020-10-26)

Study reveals most effective drugs for common type of neuropathic pain
More than 20 million people in the U.S. suffer neuropathic pain. At least 25% of those cases are classified as unexplained and considered cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy (CSPN). There is no information to guide a physician's drug choices to treat CSPN, but a researcher from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care led a first-of-its-kind prospective comparative effectiveness study. (2020-10-15)

VAV1 gene mutations trigger T-cell tumors in mice
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown how mutations in the VAV1 gene may trigger T-cell neoplasia in laboratory mice. Using cutting-edge research techniques including generation of specific transgenic mice models, tumor cell transplantation, whole transcriptome analysis, whole exome sequencing and in vivo treatment, the team was able to clarify the molecular pathways of T-cell tumor formation. These experimental protocols and animal models may be useful in evaluating novel treatments for such tumors. (2020-10-11)

Scientists developed key principles for creating an artificial vessel
Researchers from St. Petersburg provided a unique experiment. They implanted a polymer scaffold as a vascular prosthesis into the rat abdominal aorta and monitored the process of its bioresobtion for 16 months. An artificial vessel was formed where the scaffold was located. It posess similar characteristics as a natural vessel. (2020-10-08)

Drug combination proves effective in rare peripheral nerve sheath tumours
Malignant tumours of the peripheral nerve are rare but aggressive and difficult to treat successfully. Now, researchers have shown in mice that a combination of two types of anti-cancer drugs, MEK and SHP2 inhibitors, is effective in targeting the mechanism that drives the cancer's growth. One drug is already approved by the FDA and the other is currently in clinical trials for several cancers. The research will be presented at the EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium. Most abstracts go up online on 9 October. (2020-10-08)

A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves -- tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body -- often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage. They report their results in ACS Nano. (2020-10-07)

Clinician survey reveals significant variation in ultrasound-guided PIV insertion
A new survey among vascular access (VA) and emergency department (ED) clinicians has revealed significant levels of variation in ultrasound-guided peripheral IV (UGPIV) practices and supply use across hospitals and alternate care settings. Published in the September issue of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access, the findings carry critical implications for patient safety. (2020-10-01)

Hackers targeting companies that fake corporate responsibility
A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy. These hackers -- which include everyone from disgruntled employees to hacktivist groups -- can ''sniff out'' actions that only give the appearance of corporate social responsibility. (2020-09-30)

Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy. (2020-09-29)

A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists at EPFL, ETHZ and Harvard Medical School/Boston Children's Hospital have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells. (2020-09-21)

Super-potent blood stem cells discovered in human embryos
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Andrejs Ivanovs, Alexander Medvinsky (a.medvinsky@ed.ac.uk) and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh discovered that HSCs from early human embryos, when HSCs are just starting to form, are more robust at expanding than those from the cord blood. (2020-09-17)

How does chronic stress induce bone loss?
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have found that bone mineral density in patients with anxiety or depression is lower than in ordinary people. (2020-09-11)

Muscle weakness in patients in intensive care: Potential approach to treatment
Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) has taken on a new relevance as a result of the Corona virus. CIM is the specialists' term for a muscle weakness which occurs in patients being treated in intensive care for a longer period of time. In a severe case of a Covid19 infection, for example, many patients need artificial ventilation. Researchers have now found a potential method of treating CIM. The results have been published in ''Nature Communications''. (2020-09-09)

RIT/NTID researchers study how deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand. The study by Rain Bosworth, an assistant professor and researcher in the Center for Sensory, Perceptual, and Cognitive Ecology (SPaCE Center) at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, explores the unknown qualities of gaze behavior for 'sign watching' and how these are affected by a user's language expertise and intelligibility of the sign input. (2020-09-09)

USTC deciphers transcriptomic atlas of aging human and macaque retina
The work which provides valuable basic for the molecular regulation of aging progression and related diseases, was published in National Science Review on Aug. 25, 2020. (2020-09-06)

Ultraviolet B exposure expands proenkephalin+ regulatory T cells with a healing function
Skin exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) induces expansion of regulatory T (Treg) cells with immunosuppressive activity. Here researchers found that UVB-expanded skin Treg (UVB-skin Treg) cells had a tissue repair function. UVB-skin Treg cells expressed proenkephalin (PENK) and amphiregulin (AREG), which promoted keratinocyte outgrowth and skin wound healing. Their results provide a new implication in developing a therapy using UVB-skin Treg cells. (2020-09-01)

Nerve cells with energy saving program
Thanks to a metabolic adjustment, the cells can remain functional despite damage to the mitochondria. (2020-08-31)

Progress toward a treatment for Krabbe disease
The inherited disease, which typically kills children before their second birthday, has no cure, but a University of Pennsylvania study in a canine model offers hope for an effective gene therapy with lasting results. (2020-08-26)

Mechanisms identified to restore myelin sheaths after injury or in multiple sclerosis
A research team led by neurobiologist Professor Claire Jacob has identified an important mechanism that can be used to control the restoration of myelin sheaths following traumatic injury and in degenerative diseases. With the insights gained, the researchers were able to regenerate damaged myelin sheaths in mice by treating them with the active substance theophylline, thereby restoring their nerve cell function. (2020-08-24)

Targeting a chronic pain gateway could bring relief
A new approach to chronic pain treatment targets a molecule that moves pain messages into nerve cell nuclei. (2020-08-19)

UAlberta researchers find way to speed up nerve regrowth for trauma patients
A University of Alberta researcher has found a treatment that increases the speed of nerve regeneration by three to five times, leading to much better outcomes for trauma surgery patients. (2020-08-19)

PAD patients with depression had worse recovery, women twice as likely to be depressed
Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and symptoms of depression had worse recovery, according to an analysis of PAD patients receiving vascular care at a specialty clinic. Researchers detected about twice the rate of depressive symptoms among women than men. This research is the first to document the link between depressive symptoms and PAD recovery among patients newly diagnosed with PAD, which illustrates the need for a multidisciplinary approach to improve patient outcomes. (2020-08-12)

Flipping a metabolic switch to slow tumor growth
The enzyme serine palmitoyl-transferase can be used as a metabolically responsive ''switch'' that decreases tumor growth, according to a new study by a team of San Diego scientists, who published their findings Aug. 12 in the journal Nature. By restricting the dietary amino acids serine and glycine, or pharmacologically targeting the serine synthesis enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the team induced tumor cells to produce a toxic lipid that slows cancer progression in mice. (2020-08-12)

First in Human Study with Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide
A single intravenous dose of MRG-110, an anti-microRNA drug, significantly reduced miR-92a levels in the blood of healthy humans. (2020-08-12)

Penn's 'Enhanced Recovery' program significantly reduces post-op opioid use
Penn Medicine researchers found that when an ''Enhanced Recovery After Surgery'' protocol was employed--which optimizes patients' surgical care before, during, and after surgery--the majority of patients did not need opioids for pain management at one, three, and six months after elective spinal and peripheral nerve surgery. (2020-08-06)

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