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Current Peripheral Neuropathy News and Events, Peripheral Neuropathy News Articles.
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Heart disease medications underused among Hispanic/Latino populations with PAD
Recommended heart medications are underused among Hispanic/Latino people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Only a quarter to slightly more than half of Hispanic/Latino study participants with PAD reported taking recommended medications to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and to prevent blood clots. (2020-08-05)

Developing new smart soft materials
The research team directed by H. Shimomoto and E. Ihara in Ehime University synthesized pH-responsive dendronized polymers by C1 polymerization of dendron-containing diazoacetates, and demonstrated a unique pH-responsive behavior of the resulting polymers. These achievements will contribute to progress in the field of polymer chemistry and will allow us to develop new types of smart soft materials. (2020-08-04)

Assembly within the tumor center
Number of macrophages in tumor tissue enables prognosis of lung tumor progression. (2020-08-04)

Penn researchers identify new genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy
Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. This finding is detailed in a study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, presenting a clearer picture of the disease's genetic underpinnings that could inform the development of gene therapies to correct it. (2020-08-03)

Developing a new strategy to selectively deliver therapies to the brain
Developing a new strategy to selectively deliver therapies to the brain (2020-07-26)

Cellular cleanup! Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Institute of Microbial Chemistry investigated 'ER-phagy,' the degradation mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an important organelle with multiple biologically necessary functions like the synthesis of proteins and lipids. Degradation is critical for maintaining ER functions. Scientists found that the 'Atg40' protein not only marks ER parts to be degraded by autophagy, but also folds them for efficient degradation, contributing to our understanding of a critical process in cellular maintenance. (2020-07-22)

Glaucoma study findings emphasise need for regular eye checks
People with early-stage glaucoma see the contrast of visible objects in a very similar way to people without the condition, a new study has shown. (2020-07-17)

Blood vessels communicate with sensory neurons to decide their fate
The researchers, using real-time videos, have discovered that both the neurons and the cells of blood vessels emit dynamic protrusions to be able to 'talk' to each other. (2020-07-16)

Consensus statement on doppler waveforms
The first consensus-based nomenclature for arterial and venous waveforms has been published online first today in Vascular Medicine (VMJ) and the Journal for Vascular Ultrasound (JVU). This publication reflects a multispecialty collaboration in partnership with the Society for Vascular Medicine (SVM) and the Society for Vascular Ultrasound (SVU), with Writing Committee members nominated by both organizations. This document addresses a significant area of confusion in vascular testing. (2020-07-15)

Gut Piezo1 regulates gut and bone homeostasis via RNA sensing.
Gut enterochromaffin cells regulate gut and bone homeostasis via serotonin production. A recent report suggested that gut microbes regulate serotonin levels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unexplored. Here, Piezo1 is reported to be crucial for serotonin production from gut. Researchers discovered that bacterial derived RNA could activate Piezo1, leading to the production of serotonin from enterochromaffin cells, and that the RNA-Piezo1 axis could be an important target for treatment of bone and gut disorders. (2020-07-07)

Oncotarget: Clonality and antigen-specific responses shape prognostic effects
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 reported that to delineate the complexity of anti-tumor T-cell responses, the author's utilized a computational method for de novo assembly of sequences from CDR3 regions of 369 high-grade serous ovarian cancers from TCGA, and then applied deep TCR-sequencing for analyses of paired tumor and peripheral blood specimens from an independent cohort of 99 ovarian cancer patients. (2020-07-07)

Abnormal proteins in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's Disease
A new study published in The Journal of Physiology has shown that misfolded protein build-up in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice. This could suggest a new treatment approach for Alzheimer's disease that would target the gut before symptoms of cognitive deficits appear in patients. (2020-07-02)

Chemotherapy and cancer gang up to cause a neurological side effect, study says
Chemotherapy has been the lone suspect in a neurological ailment, but cancer also appears to be to blame. The havoc they wreak together is much more than additive. (2020-06-09)

Discovery of important molecular mechanism of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin, in collaboration with colleagues from Milan, Paris and Mexico, have been able to highlight a new molecular mechanism of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: According to their discovery, the protein Rab35 and the mTOR signaling pathway it regulates play a central role in the formation of myelin sheaths in the peripheral nervous system. First in-vivo experiments show that new therapies can be derived from the findings. (2020-06-08)

How much color do we really see?
Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. A study from Dartmouth in collaboration with Amherst College finds that people are aware of surprisingly limited color in their peripheral vision; much of our sense of a colorful visual world is likely constructed by our brain. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-06-08)

Neurobiology of Disease publishes results of AFFiRiS' antibody mAB C6-17 in Huntington's
Monoclonal antibody mAB C6-17 targeting human/mutant huntingtin protein (HTT/mutHTT) was developed and characterized. In vitro assay for testing cell-to-cell transmission of mutHTT was established. For the first time, capability of antibody to block mutHTT transmission in vitro was demonstrated. Results support potential of AFFiRiS' antibody-based concept for a new therapeutic targeting circulating extracellular mutHTT. (2020-06-03)

New guidelines for assessment of bone density and microarchitecture in vivo with HR-pQCT
There is an urgent need for guidance and consensus on the methods for, and reporting of, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) imaging so that different studies can be compared to each other. This position paper, published by a joint working group from IOF, ASBMR and ECTS addresses the need for standardization of techniques and terminology, provides guidance on interpretation and reporting of results, and discusses unresolved issues in the field. (2020-06-02)

Two paths better than one for treating patients with heart stents
Pairing a blood-thinning drug with aspirin daily for patients who have an angioplasty with a stent can contribute to better health outcomes, including lower risk of death, than aspirin alone, according to a recent study by cardiologists at the University of Alberta and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute. (2020-05-28)

Modified Parkinson's drug shows potential in treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) severely impairs the quality of life in patients and often leads to various liver complications. Recently, scientists at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology designed a novel compound that can potentially treat NAFLD by targeting peripheral serotonin, which regulates lipid metabolism in the liver. They achieved this by structurally modifying an existing neurological drug such that it targets peripheral serotonin by minimizing brain penetration. (2020-05-28)

Cancer researchers gain valuable insights through a comprehensive review of Clioquinol
Researchers at Karmanos Cancer Institute of Wayne State University compiled the latest cancer research on clioquinol (CQ), an anti-fungal/anti-protozoal hydroxyquinoline family drug. The authors reported that although CQ isn't suitable for cancer therapy currently, using CQ derivatives or analogues such as nitroxoline as well as combining CQ with other drugs, including docahexaenooic acid or disulfiram, are potential cancer treatments, as supported by strong positive preclinical results. (2020-05-21)

A sole mate to prevent diabetic foot ulcers
A new cooling insole developed by UT Southwestern scientists reduced the foot temperature of patients with diabetic neuropathy by several degrees, diminishing a significant risk factor for diabetic foot ulcers. (2020-05-21)

Heart attack prevention lags for people with stroke, peripheral artery disease
Although all three conditions can lead to heart attack, people with stroke or peripheral artery disease were less likely to receive preventive treatments to prevent heart attack than people with coronary artery disease. Stroke survivors were more likely to report poor health care satisfaction and more emergency room visits. Patients with peripheral artery disease had the highest out-of-pocket health expenses of the three conditions. (2020-05-16)

Burning fat with brain-sparing amphetamines without harmful side effects
The team of Ana Domingos, principal investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) and Associate Professor of the University of Oxford, together with Gonçalo Bernardes, principal investigator at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular (IMM) and Reader at the University Cambridge, have modified amphetamine so that does not enter the brain while avoiding its known side effects. (2020-05-13)

Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) x-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders
Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, says the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differential diagnosis in pediatric patients, leading to optimal patient care. (2020-05-08)

Prime time for lower extremity artery disease
This article provides an overview of the indications and techniques of lower extremity revascularisation, and an in-depth analysis of the available evidence regarding type and duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment following endovascular and surgical revascularisation. (2020-05-06)

Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers
In an international collaboration led by Lund University in Sweden, researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes. The technique shows the 3D-structure of nerve fibers in very high resolution. (2020-05-06)

Genetic study ties higher alcohol consumption to increased stroke and PAD risk
Using genetic analysis, researchers found higher alcohol consumption increased risks for stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Studies using genetic analysis don't rely on observational data, which often use self-reported data and could be subject to unreported risk factors. (2020-05-05)

Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs -- if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-05-05)

Nanostimulators boost stem cells for muscle repair
In regenerative medicine, an ideal treatment for patients whose muscles are damaged from lack of oxygen would be to invigorate them with an injection of their own stem cells. Illinois researchers demonstrated that 'nanostimulators' - -nanoparticles seeded with a molecule the body naturally produces to prompt stem cells to heal wounds -- can amp up stem cells' regenerative powers in a targeted limb in mice. (2020-05-01)

Work-related stress linked to increased risk for peripheral artery disease
People who reported work-related stress were more likely to be hospitalized for treatment of peripheral artery disease compared to those who did not report work-related stress. Work-related stress, or job strain, refers to psychological and social stress at work, often from high expectations combined with lower levels of personal control. (2020-04-28)

Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting biorobotic engineering applications to help solve real world challenges. However, this requires the creation of biohybrid, which is a challenge. Researchers combined an intact rat spinal cord with a tissue-engineered, 3D muscle system. They describe the novel biohybrid system in the journal APL Bioengineering. (2020-04-28)

Spinal cord gives bio-bots walking rhythm
Miniature biological robots are making greater strides than ever, thanks to the spinal cord directing their steps. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers developed the tiny walking 'spinobots,' powered by rat muscle and spinal cord tissue on a soft, 3D-printed hydrogel skeleton. While previous generations of biological robots, or bio-bots, could move forward by simple muscle contraction, the integration of the spinal cord gives them a more natural walking rhythm. (2020-04-28)

How animals 'dial up' the pain they experience from certain stimuli
Scientists have -- for the first time -- shown how chemical triggers in the nervous system can amplify the pain experienced by mammals in response to certain stimuli. (2020-04-28)

Trade friction: Adaptiveness of swarms of complex networks
Network analysis revealed power-law properties of core and peripheral networks. The USD/JPY exchange rate affected B2B networks by changing structures. (2020-04-17)

Ludwig MSK study reveals bile metabolite of gut microbes boosts immune cells
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has discovered a novel means by which bacterial colonies in the small intestine support the generation of regulatory T cells--immune cells that suppress autoimmune reactions and inflammation. (2020-04-15)

Patients with type 2 diabetes belonging to online support groups have poorer health
Diabetes is a disease that affects people's lives more in the long term and requires emotional support and information. It is increasingly common for people with diabetes to participate in digital communities and seek help in so-called OSGs (online support groups) to share experiences and glean information. This social phenomenon has been little studied (2020-03-19)

A new strategy for the management of inflammatory pain
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has discovered a new mechanism of long-lasting pain relief. The cell-signaling protein interleukin-4 induces a specific type of blood cell to produce endogenous opioids at the site of inflammation. The researchers' findings have been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) Insight*. (2020-03-16)

Regenerative nerve interface enhances precision and durability of hand prostheses
Researchers have found that a new nerve interface technology endows upper limb amputees with greater control and precision when using prosthetic hands. (2020-03-04)

International group of scientists found new regulators of blood supply to the brain
There are approximately as many neuroglia class cells known as astrocytes in the brain as there are neurons, but the function of these cells has long remained a mystery to scientists. (2020-02-26)

As out-of-pocket costs for neurologic medications rise, people less likely to take them
As out-of-pocket costs go up for drugs for the neurologic disorders Alzheimer's disease, peripheral neuropathy and Parkinson's disease, people are less likely to take the drugs as often as their doctors prescribed, according to a study funded by the American Academy of Neurology and published in the Feb. 19, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-02-19)

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