Current Personality Traits News and Events

Current Personality Traits News and Events, Personality Traits News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Psychological 'signature' for the extremist mind uncovered by Cambridge researchers
Study investigates ideological attitudes using an unprecedented number of cognitive and personality tests, and finds that people who lean towards ''extreme pro-group action'' have a similar type of mind. (2021-02-21)

How location dictates biological clocks of species: Study in beetles offers new insights
Biological clocks are ubiquitous in living organisms and govern their behavioral pattern, from sleep-wake cycle to reproduction. Although they are well-understood, how they differ based on geographic location is unclear. In a new study, scientists from Japan report variations in the biological clocks of red flour beetles across the country, offering new insights into how they work. (2021-02-18)

Is odor the secret to bats' sex appeal?
A literature review revealed that odor-producing glands and tissues in bats may play a prominent role in mating behavior (2021-02-18)

Study suggests link between DNA and marriage satisfaction in newlyweds
New study from a University of Arkansas psychologist suggests a link between DNA and traits beneficial to bonding and satisfaction in first years of marriage. (2021-02-18)

Breeding better seeds: Healthy food for more people
For thousands of years, farmers have worked to perfect their crops. Today, scientists use the latest advances to improve the foundation of civilization -- our seeds. (2021-02-17)

University of Limerick research finds new link between personality and risk of death
Ground-breaking research led by University of Limerick, Ireland has revealed for the first time that the immune system directly links personality to long-term risk of death. (2021-02-17)

Answer quickly to be believed
When people pause before replying to a question, even for just a few seconds, their answers are perceived to be less sincere and credible than if they had replied immediately, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-02-16)

Capuchin monkey genome reveals clues to its long life and large brain
An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of a capuchin monkey for the first time, uncovering new genetic clues about the evolution of their long lifespan and large brains. Published in PNAS, the work was led by the University of Calgary in Canada and involved researchers at the University of Liverpool. (2021-02-15)

Computer love
In your quest for true love and that elusive happily ever after, are you waiting for the ''right'' person to come along, or do you find yourself going for the cutest guy or girl in the room, hoping things will work out? Do you leave your options open, hoping to ''trade-up'' at the next opportunity, or do you invest in your relationship with an eye on the cost-benefits analysis? (2021-02-12)

Smartphone app to change your personality
How quickly can personality traits be modified? An international research team led by the University of Zurich has shown that daily use of a smartphone app can lead to desired personality changes within three months. And three months after the daily interventions, the changes are still noticeable. (2021-02-11)

New insights to past ecosystems are now available based on pollen and plant traits
Researchers have mined and combined information from two databases to link pollen and key plant traits to generate confidence in the ability to reconstruct past ecosystem services. The approach can help understand how plants performed different benefits useful for humans over the past 21,000 years, and how these services responded to human and climate disturbances. (2021-02-11)

Neandertal genes alter neurodevelopment in modern human brain organoids
Building modern human brain organoids with the Neanderthal variant of a gene has provided a glimpse into the way substitutions in this gene impacted our species' evolution. (2021-02-11)

Brain activity can reveal the severity of autistic traits
A team of researchers from Russia and Israel applied a new algorithm to classify the severity of autistic personality traits by studying subjects' brain activity. The article 'Brief Report: Classification of Autistic Traits According to Brain Activity Recoded by fNIRS Using ε-Complexity Coefficients' is published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. (2021-02-11)

Cataloguing genetic information about yams
New collection of resources will help yam breeders and farmers. (2021-02-10)

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator
Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from. (2021-02-10)

How accurate are first impressions on a first date?
The high stakes of first dates require would-be partners to make and interpret first impressions. But, can we rely on these first impressions to accurately assess someone's personality? According to researchers from McGill University, the answer is yes, although it may be more difficult than in more casual settings. (2021-02-09)

Marmoset monkeys have personalities too
An international team of behavioral biologists from Austria, Brazil and the Netherlands, with Vedrana Å lipogor from the University of Vienna as leading author of the study, designed a set of tasks to assess personality of common marmosets. These results have just been published in American Journal of Primatology. (2021-02-08)

Help for borderline personality disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder, or BPD, is the most common personality disorder in Australia, affecting up to 5% of the population at some stage, and Flinders University researchers warn more needs to be done to meet this high consumer needs. A new study in the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Wiley) describes how people with BPD are becoming more knowledgeable about the disorder and available treatments, but may find it difficult to find evidence-based help for their symptoms. (2021-02-04)

Time management can work but in unexpected ways, according to new research
Concordia University postdoc Brad Aeon and his colleagues Aïda Faber of Université Laval in Quebec City and Alexandra Panaccio, associate professor of management at John Molson, conducted a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis of time management literature. Their study pored over data from 158 separate studies spanning four decades, six continents and involving more than 53,000 respondents. Their conclusion? Yes, time management does work. Though maybe not as one might initially think. (2021-02-04)

New research about emerging 'COVID-19 personality types'
New research just published identifies and explores the impacts of salient viral or COVID-19 behavioural identities that are emerging. (2021-01-29)

Family's our focus during pandemic, study finds
More fully appreciating family and engaging in more conflict are among the heightened experiences during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new UC Riverside study. (2021-01-29)

New study identifies bird species that could spread ticks and Lyme disease
A new study published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography used machine learning to identify bird species with the potential to transmit the Lyme disease bacterium (Borrelia burgdorferi) to feeding ticks. The team developed a model that identified birds known to spread Lyme disease with 80% accuracy and flagged 21 new species that should be prioritized for surveillance. (2021-01-27)

Researchers identify genetic dependencies in tumors that have undergone whole genome doubling
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified proteins that are essential for the viability of whole genome doubled tumor cells, yet non-essential to normal cells that comprise the majority of human tissue. (2021-01-27)

AI used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia in relatives of patients
University of Alberta researchers have taken a step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest on a self-reported schizotypal personality trait scale. (2021-01-26)

Mental health is important to overall health, and heart disease prevention and treatment
Depression and negative psychological health conditions are associated with a less healthy heart and body, while optimism and other positive mental health states are associated with a healthier heart and body. Health care professionals should consider patients' psychological health when evaluating or treating people with or at risk for heart disease. (2021-01-25)

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults. (2021-01-25)

Study highlights factors that predict success for treating canine behavioral disorders
Canine behavioral problems are one of the leading causes of why pets are abandoned at shelters. Researchers have identified some of the key factors in both dogs and their owners that predict the success or failure of clinical interventions to correct problems like aggression or separation anxiety. This information may be valuable for veterinarians to provide better guidance to dog owners in future cases that require clinical intervention. (2021-01-22)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
A team of researchers led by the University of South Florida has decoded the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake, which has venom 40 times more toxic than that of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes, the largest venomous snake in North America. (2021-01-19)

Sexual harassment claims by less feminine women perceived as less credible
Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-01-14)

Behavioral traits converge for humans and animals sharing an environment
Humans, mammals and birds that live in a particular environment share a common set of behavioral traits, according to a new study, which identifies a local convergence of foraging, reproductive and social behaviors across species. (2021-01-14)

Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth (2021-01-13)

Zombie movies prepared you for the pandemic
Tales of post-apocalyptic landscapes in which few survivors emerge into a new and much different world have long been popular tales woven by screenwriters and authors. While many enjoy these stories, thinking of them as nothing but a guilty pleasure, they may not realize that immersing themselves in fiction has prepared them for the reality of 2020, according to a team of researchers. (2021-01-11)

Researchers find nonnative species in Oahu play greater role in seed dispersal
Oahu's ecosystems have been so affected by species extinctions and invasions that most of the seeds dispersed on the island belong to nonnative plants, and most of them are dispersed by nonnative birds. (2021-01-11)

Autism theory 25 years in the making
A unifying explanation of the cause of autism and the reason for its rising prevalence has eluded scientists for decades, but a theoretical model published in the journal Medical Hypotheses describes the cause as a combination of socially valued traits, common in autism, and any number of co-occurring disabilities. (2021-01-08)

Noncognitive skills -- distinct from cognitive abilities -- are important to success across the life
Noncognitive skills and cognitive abilities are both important contributors to educational attainment and lead to success across the life course, according to a new study from an international team. The research provides evidence for the idea that inheriting genes that affect things other than cognitive ability are important for understanding differences in people's life outcomes. Until now there had been questions about what these noncognitive skills are and how much they matter for life outcomes. (2021-01-07)

Chinese scientists uncover gene for rice adaption to low soil nitrogen
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have found a gene that plays an important role in helping rice adapt to low soil nitrogen. (2021-01-06)

Self-controlled children tend to be healthier middle-aged adults
Self-control of one's thoughts, feelings and behaviors is one of the personality traits that makes a child ready for school. And, it turns out, ready for life as well. A large New Zealand study tracking 1,000 people from birth through age 45 has determined that people who had higher levels of self-control as children were aging more slowly than their peers at age 45. Their bodies and brains were healthier and biologically younger. (2021-01-05)

NTU Singapore study suggests link between word choices and extraverts
A study by a team of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) psychologists has found a link between extraverts and their word choices. (2020-12-27)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.