Current Perspective News and Events

Current Perspective News and Events, Perspective News Articles.
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Special Issue: Human genome at 20
In February 2001, the first drafts of the human genome were published. (2021-02-04)

Sliding life expectancy poses gender and inequity questions
Life expectancy gain is slowing in Australia - and figures show these figures are already sliding backwards in both the US and UK - yet little is being done by policy makers to understand specific gender and inequity reasons why this slip is occurring. (2021-01-22)

New solutions for addressing systemic risks
Systemic risks like climate change, cybersecurity and pandemics are characterised by high complexity, uncertainty, ambiguity, and effects beyond the system in which they originate. That's why novel research approaches and regulatory measures are indispensable for the evaluation and management of these risks. An interdisciplinary team recently published a paper on this subject, which appears as the first article in a special issue of the journal ''Risk Analysis,'' edited by Ortwin Renn and Pia-Johanna Schweizer from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies. (2020-12-18)

How the brain distinguishes fact from possibility
Processing certain factual information elicits stronger brain activity than uncertain information, according to research recently published in eNeuro. (2020-12-07)

Researchers study influence of cultural factors on gesture design
Freehand gesture-based interfaces in interactive systems are becoming more common, but what if your preferred way to gesture a command - say, changing the TV to channel 10 - significantly differed from that of a user from another culture? Would the system recognize your command? Researchers from the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology and their collaborators explored this question and found that some gesture choices are significantly influenced by the cultural backgrounds of participants. (2020-12-01)

Special issue: Cooling in a Warming World
In this special issue of Science, Cooling in a Warming World, three Perspectives and three Reviews highlight the wide array of new and improved technologies and solutions that aim to keep us and the materials we rely on cool, in our rapidly warming planet. (2020-11-12)

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind. But it is still unclear what exactly they constitute. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has now developed a model which explains what empathy and perspective taking are made of: It is not one specific competence rather than many individual factors that vary according to the situation. (2020-11-10)

Using walls to navigate the room
Scientists discover a brain circuit that signals the direction and distance of boundaries in the environment to help coordinate next movements (2020-11-07)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

Evenness is important in assessing progress towards sustainable development goals
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) emphasize a holistic achievement instead of cherry-picking a few. However, no assessment has quantitatively considered the evenness among all goals. Here, Liu and colleagues propose a systematic method, integrating both evenness and the overall status of all goals to expand the implications of sustainable development assessment, and revisit the development trajectory in China from 2000 to 2015. The study demonstrates the importance of adopting evenness in assessing and guiding sustainable development. (2020-10-26)

Like humans, aging wild chimpanzees value their more "positive" friendships most
Like humans, wild chimpanzees focus on fewer yet more meaningful friendships as they grow older, say researchers who studied male chimps over two decades. (2020-10-22)

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study carried out at the University of Geneva reveals that people who support immigration are ready and willing to adopt an empathetic approach and a wider perspective. By contrast, when opponents of immigration are asked to engage in perspective taking, they feel more competition with their ''adversary.'' (2020-10-14)

The benefits of a prostate cancer screening tool
Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate (mpMRIp) is a promising tool for diagnosing prostate cancer, and prior to its availability, detection relied on clinical exams and prostate specific antigen screening. (2020-10-07)

The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies. (2020-09-16)

UC Berkeley demographers put COVID-19 death toll into perspective
With over 170,000 COVID-19 deaths to date, and 1,000 more each day, America's life expectancy may appear to be plummeting. But in estimating the magnitude of the pandemic, UC Berkeley demographers have found that COVID-19 is likely to shorten the average US lifespan in 2020 by only about a year. (2020-08-25)

Energy transition away from coal in China will yield benefits
China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University's Gang He, PhD, contend that China needs to transition away from coal to help the world achieve global decarbonization and improve the nation's environmental and human health. (2020-08-21)

Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)

Positive contact between muslims and christians in soccer league built cohesion, with limitations
According to a study that evaluated how prejudice can be reduced when rival groups come together, having Muslim teammates caused Christian players in Iraq to change their behavior for the better toward their Muslim counterparts. (2020-08-13)

Integration of gene regulatory networks in understanding animal behavior
For years, scientists have attributed animal behavior to the coordinated activities of neuronal cells and its circuits of neurons, known as the neuronal network (NN). However, researchers are pushing the boundaries in understanding animal behavior through the integration of gene regulation. (2020-08-07)

Identifying and contending with radioisotopes of concern at Fukushima
In this Perspective, Ken Buesseler describes the enormous challenges that remain in doing clean-up on land in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in 2011, even as some progress has been made offshore. (2020-08-06)

International conference on social determinants of health identified change needs
In November 2019, clinicians, health administrators, educators and researchers from around the world gathered in Toronto to discuss how to best address social determinants of health from a primary care perspective. (2020-07-14)

The geological record of mud deposits
The UPV/EHU's HAREA: Coastal Geology research group has conducted a study into how human activities may have influenced the mud depocentres on the Basque shelf, in other words, in the area of the Basque Mud Patch (BMP) on the coast of Gipuzkoa down the ages. The research by the UPV/EHU has been published in the scientific journal Quaternary International. (2020-06-26)

A special elemental magic
Kyoto University physicists develop a 'nuclear periodic table'. While the traditional table is based on the behavior of electrons in an atom, this new table is based on the protons in the nucleus. Protons have different stable magic numbers, and the table highlights alternative ways to illustrate the laws of nature. (2020-05-27)

Finding working capital is key to small businesses efforts as reopening accelerates
Small businesses are suffering affer a long pandemic shutdown and they are worried about what will be needed as they begin to reopen. Interviews with a select group of small business owners found that access to working capital is key to reopening, as well as clear guidance from government or trade organizations about how to reopen safely during the pandemic. (2020-05-27)

Virtual reality makes empathy easier
Virtual reality activates brain networks that increase your ability to identify with other people, according to new research published in eNeuro. The technology could become a tool in the treatment of violent offenders to empathize more with others. (2020-04-20)

Mind-body medicine experts urge full integration of stress reduction into care and research
In a perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and from UC Davis Health call for broader use of mind-body practices. (2020-04-09)

Mirror, mirror, on the wall
How accurately can you judge your own looks? Researchers looked at how we rate our own bodies when viewed from a first-person perspective compared to when viewed from an outside perspective. They did this by creating three virtual bodies ('avatars') for each participant. Participants rated their own body as more attractive when viewing it from a third-person perspective in virtual reality and showed that our internal representation of our own body shape is highly inaccurate. (2020-03-18)

The brain has two systems for thinking about others' thoughts
The brain seems to have two different systems through which we can put ourselves into the shoes of someone else. These two systems mature at different times such that only 4-year-olds can understand what another person is thinking, and not, as some have assumed, 1-year-olds. These are the findings from a new study in the journal PNAS. (2020-03-06)

Severe peanut allergy may be a 'gut reaction'
A new study of 19 people who suffer from peanut allergy found an abundance of allergy-causing immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in the gut, providing valuable insights into the mechanisms of severe allergies to peanuts and other foods, which together affect as much as 6% of the US population. (2020-03-05)

Setting up fundamental bases for information metasurface
In recent years, investigations of metasurfaces have been extended from the physical and material sciences to digital and information category. Therefore, the study of metasurfaces from information perspective requires a general theory for guidance. Scientists in China reported a theory for characterization on information and information processing capabilities of metasurfaces, and demonstrated the relation between the information of metasurface and its far-field pattern. (2020-02-06)

Half of women with heart failure get the wrong treatment
As many as 50 per cent of women suffering from cardiac arrest are given insufficient treatment, because the heart failure was not caused by a heart attack. (2020-01-06)

Grower citizen science project uses collaboration to improve soil health
The Grower Citizen Science Project is a collaboration between soil scientists and growers in the southern High Plains of Texas. Growers have collected soil samples, measured carbon dioxide fluxes, and shared yield data with scientists. Scientists have installed soil moisture and temperature sensors and analyzed nutrients, soil microbial communities, and other data and then shared their findings with growers. (2020-01-06)

OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu
Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. The images offer a detailed look at small-scale mass loss events on an active asteroid, whereas before, observations have been limited to only the largest phenomena. (2019-12-05)

Smart reactions through online design of catalytic pockets
Mapping the three-dimensional structure of catalytic centers helps to design new and improved catalysts. (2019-11-26)

Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase
SciLifeLab researchers Alexander Mühleip and Alexey Amunts from Stockholm University solved the structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase with native lipids. (2019-11-18)

Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri. (2019-09-24)

Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police. (2019-09-24)

Electric tech could help reverse baldness
Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2019-09-19)

Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. A new study shows that people tend to favor diversity for others, but prefer to work with people who are as similar to themselves as possible. A team of researchers from the universities of Basel and Koblenz-Landau published their report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. (2019-09-12)

Seeing it both ways: Visual perspective in memory
Think of a memory from your childhood. Are you seeing the memory through your own eyes, or can you see yourself, while viewing that child as if you were an observer? (2019-08-27)

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