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Current Pesticides News and Events, Pesticides News Articles.
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Scientists' warning to humanity on insect extinctions
As the human race continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists have found that the planet's insects are also facing a crisis after accelerating rates of extinction have led to a worldwide fall in insect numbers. (2020-04-06)

What motivates sales of pollinator-friendly plants?
Pollinator issues have emerged as critical within public awareness. As a result, many consumers and activists have advocated for the removal of commonly used pesticides. As various media and activist groups provide information (positive, neutral, and negative) about the impact of pesticides on pollinators, no information exists regarding how consumer behavior is altered based on such information. The authors determined how both information source and information type have an impact on a consumer's decision to purchase pollinator-friendly plants in the future. (2020-03-24)

Pesticide seed coatings are widespread but underreported
Seed-coated pesticides -- such as neonicotinoids, many of which are highly toxic to both pest and beneficial insects -- are increasingly used in the major field crops, but are underreported, in part, because farmers often do not know what pesticides are on their seeds, according to an international team of researchers. The lack of data may complicate efforts to evaluate the value of different pest management strategies, while also protecting human health and the environment. (2020-03-17)

Pesticides increase the risk of schistosomiasis, a tropical disease
Schistosomiasis is a severe infectious disease caused by parasitic worms. As an intermediate host, freshwater snails play a central role in the life cycle of the parasite. Researchers from UFZ in cooperation with the icipe (Kenya) succeeded in proving that snail populations in waterbodies contaminated with pesticides were significantly larger than in uncontaminated waterbodies. The pesticides used in agriculture may well be an outright driver for the risk of infection with schistosomiasis, the researchers warn. (2020-03-05)

How pest management strategies affect the bottom line
Concern regarding impacts of pesticides on the environment and human health has led to the development of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. A component of these programs involves the use of observation of pest populations in the field to direct timing of pesticide applications. Central to the concept of IPM is the use of an economic threshold of a population level where an application of a pesticide is advisable. (2020-02-28)

Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides. (2020-02-27)

USask computer-based simulator tests insects for effects of new pesticide
University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have used a novel combination of techniques to compare the effects of two families of pesticides used in agriculture, and found that at low dosages the newer pesticide is less toxic than a currently used neonicotinoid one. (2020-02-24)

Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app
A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed -- and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for 'rapid action' action on. (2020-02-13)

EPA fails to follow landmark law to protect children from pesticides in food
The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children's health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. But an investigation by EWG, published this week in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, found that the EPA has failed to add the mandated children's health safety factor to the allowable limits for almost 90 percent of the most common pesticides. (2020-02-12)

Burrowing mayfly's decline may serve as a warning system for the health of our environment
But scientists from Virginia Tech and the University of Notre Dame recently discovered that a particular species -- the burrowing mayfly -- had a population decrease of nearly 84 percent from 2015 to 2019. (2020-02-07)

Mosquitoes seek heat using repurposed ancestral cooling receptor
In a mosquito responsible for transmission of malaria, heat-seeking behavior -- critical to this insect's ability to locate and feed on warm-blooded hosts -- relies on a thermoreceptor that was once focused on heat avoidance (to help the mosquito keep cool). (2020-02-06)

Wasps' gut microbes help them -- and their offspring -- survive pesticides
Exposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing Feb. 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide. (2020-02-04)

Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons
Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin. (2020-01-29)

A proposal to change environmental risk assessment for pesticides
Despite regulatory frameworks designed to prevent environmental damage, pesticide use is still linked to declines in insects, birds and aquatic species, an outcome that raises questions about the efficacy of current regulatory procedures. (2020-01-23)

Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss
Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds. (2020-01-14)

Time for a closer look at Pyrethroid insecticides
Columbia professors offer their perspective on a recent study on Pyrethroid, among the most widely used insecticides for public health control of vector-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus. While the insecticides are generally regarded as posing low health risks to humans in ordinary exposure situations, results show a 50 percent increase in total mortality and three-fold increase in heart disease deaths in persons with high urinary levels of 3-PBA. This unexpected finding merits urgent follow-up. (2020-01-03)

SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. Intensive agriculture is the main driver, particularly the heavy use of pesticides. Now, however, SFU biological sciences researchers Adam Blake and Gerhard Gries have made a key discovery that could help to reverse this decline. (2019-11-28)

Study suggests weight-loss surgery may release toxic compounds from fat into bloodstream
Toxic man-made chemicals -- such as polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides -- that are absorbed into the body and stored in fat may be released into the bloodstream during the rapid fat loss that follows bariatric surgery, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The finding points to the need for further research to understand the health effects of this potential toxicant exposure. (2019-11-13)

Knowing your neighbors may shape US household yard care practices
Neighbor peer pressure may be linked to increases in yard fertilization and irrigation across several distinct climate regions of the US, according to a study published Nov. 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dexter Locke from the USDA Forest Service, US, and colleagues. (2019-11-13)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

SDHI pesticides are toxic for human cells
French scientists led by a CNRS researcher have just revealed that eight succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor pesticide molecules do not just inhibit the SDH activity of fungi, but can also block that of earthworms, bees, and human cells in varying proportions. They demonstrated that the conditions of current regulatory tests for toxicity mask a very important effect that SDH inhibitors have on human cells: the pesticides induce oxidative stress in cells, leading to their death. (2019-11-07)

Fishery in Lake Shinji, Japan, collapsed 1 year after neonicotinoid use
Neonicotinoid pesticide use may have caused the abrupt collapse of two commercial fisheries on Lake Shinji, Japan, in 1993, according to a new study. (2019-10-31)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Pesticide companies leverage regulations for financial gains
Some pesticide companies may put profit ahead of protecting the public from potential harms. By acquiring regulations that ban older, out-of-patent products, innovative companies can make room for more expensive, patented alternatives. (2019-10-08)

Pesticides likely caused 'Havana syndrome' that affected Cuba-based diplomats
The study details the nature of the injury, specifies the brain regions involved, including the blood-brain barrier and suggests a possible cause in the form of 'cholinesterase inhibitors,' with 'organophosphorus insecticides' being a likely source. Cholinesterase (ChE) is one of the key enzymes required for the proper functioning of the nervous systems of humans, invertebrates and insects. (2019-10-03)

Pesticide exposure may increase heart disease and stroke risk
Occupational exposure to high levels of pesticides may raise the risk of heart disease and stroke, even in generally healthy men. The study emphasizes the importance of using protective gear when handling pesticides on the job and including pesticide exposure in your medical history. (2019-09-25)

Environment: Pollutants found in skin and blubber of English Channel dolphins
High levels of pollutants, such as industrial fluids and mercury, may have accumulated in the blubber and skin of one of the largest coastal populations of dolphins in Europe, a study in Scientific Reports indicates. Mercury concentrations found in 82 dolphins living in the English Channel are among the highest concentrations observed in the species, the work suggests. (2019-09-12)

Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds
New University of Saskatchewan research shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for dramatic declines in farmland bird populations. In the first experiment to track effects of a neonicotinoid pesticide on birds in the wild, the team found that white-crowned sparrows who consumed small doses of imidacloprid insecticide suffered weight loss and delays to their migration -- effects that could severely harm the birds' chances of surviving and reproducing. (2019-09-12)

Neonicotinoid insecticides cause rapid weight loss and travel delays in migrating songbirds
Songbirds exposed to imidacloprid, a widely used neonicotinoid insecticide, exhibit anorexic behavior, reduced body weight and delays in their migratory itinerary, according to a new study. (2019-09-12)

EPA announces plan to end required animal tests for chemical safety testing
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler announced today that animal testing to assess the safety of products under EPA's authority will be substantially reduced in 6 years and phased out by 2035. (2019-09-10)

Prenatal pesticide exposure linked to changes in teen's brain activity
Prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticides has been linked to poorer cognition and behavior problems in children. A new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers is one of the first to use advanced brain imaging to reveal how exposure can actually change brain activity. Teenagers estimated to have higher levels of prenatal exposure to organophosphates showed altered brain activity compared to their peers while performing tasks that require executive control, the study found. (2019-08-27)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)

Urban stormwater could release contaminants to ground, surface waters
A good rainstorm can make a city feel clean and revitalized. However, the substances that wash off of buildings, streets and sidewalks and down storm drains might not be so refreshing. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have analyzed untreated urban stormwater from 50 rainstorms across the US, finding a wide variety of contaminants that could potentially harm aquatic organisms in surface waters and infiltrate ground water. (2019-08-21)

Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees
A new paper in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees. (2019-08-05)

'Intensive' beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases
More 'intensive' beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests. (2019-07-17)

Plant probe could help estimate bee exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides
Bee populations are declining, and neonicotinoid pesticides continue to be investigated -- and in some cases banned -- because of their suspected role as a contributing factor. However, limitations in sampling and analytical techniques have prevented a full understanding of the connection. Now, researchers describe in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology a new approach to sample neonicotinoids and other pesticides in plants, which could explain how bees are exposed to the substances. (2019-07-17)

Pesticide exposure linked to teen depression in agricultural communities
Adolescent depression increases with exposure to pesticides, a study in the Ecuadorian Andes shows. (2019-07-02)

Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. The scientists analyzed six years of data collected through a unique system for monitoring domesticated bees that is unparalleled in Europe. Their findings are published in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2019-06-26)

The case of the poisoned songbirds
Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2019-06-26)

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