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Current Pesticides News and Events, Pesticides News Articles.
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Increasing Threat Of Extinction For Amphibians? Scientists To Seek Answers At NSF Workshop
Where have all the frogs, toads and salamanders gone? The world's leading researchers on amphibian declines will debate that question, and seek explanations for continuing downward trends of some amphibian populations, at a workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). (1998-05-15)
Water Quality In Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Affected By Agricultural And Urban Activities
Water quality is generally good in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain but has been adversely affected by agricultural and urban land uses in some areas, according to the results of a five-year investigation by the U.S. (1998-04-27)
USGS Says Central Columbia Plateau Water Quality Impaired by Agriculture, But Some Good News
Water quality in the Central Columbia Plateau of eastern Washington and western Idaho has been adversely affected by agriculture, especially in irrigated areas, according to the results of a five-year investigation by the U. (1998-04-22)
Agriculture and urban activities impact water quality in the South Platte River Basin
Although agriculture and urban activities have substantially affected water quality in several areas of the South Platte River Basin, concentrations of pesticides and volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as MTBE, are generally below levels of concern for human health, according to the results of a 5-year investigation of water quality by the U.S. (1998-04-16)
Reduced Nutrients Still Cause Problems In The Neuse And Tar-Pamlico Rivers
Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen have generally declined since 1980 in streams draining into the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds in North Carolina but remain high enough to cause water-quality problems in the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico Rivers, according to the results of a 5-year investigation by the U.S. (1998-04-16)
From The Home Front To The River Front, USGS Updates Water-Quality Information
Two U.S. Geological Survey water-quality studies in the Lower Susquehanna and Potomac River Basins found high levels of nitrate and high counts of bacteria in ground water from wells used for household supply in several rural areas. (1998-04-16)
No Ode To Joy From Food Scientists Over New Edition
The new edition of Joy of Cooking (Plume, December 1997) misleads readers with inaccurate food Back Page column in the April 1998 issue of Food Technology. (1998-04-15)
Water Quality In Indiana's White River Basin Affected By Urban And Agricultural Activities
Water quality in the White River Basin is impacted by urban and agricultural activities, according to the results of a five-year investigation by the U.S. (1998-04-08)
Conference Brief: Balancing Risks And Benefits Of Pesticides On Foods
UC Davis toxicologist Carl Winter describes cases when pesticides actually increase the healthfulness of foods by reducing the levels of naturally occurring toxins produced by the plants or fungi on the plants. (1998-03-31)
Insect Taste Buds Target Of Control Method
Insects are probably more finicky than cats when it comes to their diets, so a Penn State insect toxicologist is targeting their taste buds in an effort to protect crops. (1998-03-30)
Research Aims At Nation's First 'Smart' Ground Water Regulations
A unique strategy on how to handle ground water pollution -- one that uses (1998-01-22)
Cut Pesticide Use In Half, Urges SFU Biologist
The use of chemical pesticides in North American can and should be reduced by at least 50 per cent, says Simon Fraser University biologist Mark Winston, author of a new book, Nature Wars: People vs. (1997-11-28)
In Minnesota, Wisconsin, New York, Vermont And Parts Of Canada: Why Are The Frogs Malformed? -- Parasites, Pesticides And/Or UV?
A workshop on Strategies for Assessing the Implications of Malformed Frogs for Environmental Health will be held Dec. (1997-11-18)
Electrically Based Technologies Heat Up The Cleanup Market
Two technologies developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that promise faster, cheaper and more effective cleanup of certain contaminated soils now are available commercially. (1997-09-10)
No Link Seen Between Breast Cancer And Pesticides, PCB Exposure For General Population
A University at Buffalo study of the relationship of pesticides and PCBs with breast cancer shows these compounds are not a risk factor for breast cancer for the general population of women. (1997-08-20)
It's Easy To Reduce Chemical Exposure On Golf Courses, Experts Say
Clark Throssell, professor of agronomy at Purdue University, says golf courses are environmentally friendly, and golfers who are concerned about contact with the chemicals can take a few simple precautions to reduce exposure. (1997-08-01)
EPA's Plant-Pesticide Policy Threatens To Stifle Development Of Pesticide Alternatives And International Trade
Members of an 11-society scientific consortium are concerned about the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed policy to regulate the traits in plants that make them resistant to pests. (1997-07-29)
Natural Shelters on Leaves House Plant Bodyguards
Want your bodyguards to stick around? Give them lodging. Some plants seem to do just that in the form of tiny pockets and hair tufts on the undersides of leaves, offering the shelter necessary to house a population of plant-protecting bugs (1997-06-05)
Satellites And Sensors To Be Used For Better Control Of Crop Pests
It's only a matter of time before pest infestations can be mapped with hand-held computers linked to global positioning satellite receivers, allowing more accurate pest control, say University of Illinois researchers (1997-04-03)
Teaching Old Watchdogs New Tricks
A Kansas State University analytical chemist wants to scrub the persistent problem of too-high pesticide residues on Central American fruits and vegetables shipped to the United States. (1996-09-20)
Natural Pest Control Shows Economic Promise For Citrus Industry
An obscure wasp species found by a University of Wyoming researcher in Costa Rica shows promise for controlling a damaging citrus crop pest and ultimately may translate to lower prices for some orange juices marketed in the United States. (1996-09-09)
Southern Pine Beetle Reaching Outbreak Levels In North Florida
Southern Pine Beetle populations have exploded to outbreak levels along the Suwannee River in Hamilton and Madison counties, where the tree-killing beetle has invaded several pine plantations. (1996-07-03)
Transgenic Rice Plants Resist Insects, Drought And Salt Damage
Biologists at Cornell and Washington universities have genetically engineered and successfully field tested rice plants that resist some of the most destructive insects as well as salt and drought damage. (1996-06-11)
Dangerous Chemical Combination Presents Possible Scenario For Gulf War Illnesses
Animal experiments at Duke University Medical Center show that harmless doses of three chemicals used to protect Gulf War soldiers from insect-borne diseases and nerve-gas poisoning are highly toxic when used in combination, researchers reported Wednesday. (1996-04-29)
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