Current Pharmaceutical Companies News and Events

Current Pharmaceutical Companies News and Events, Pharmaceutical Companies News Articles.
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Long-term exposure to low levels of air pollution increases risk of heart and lung disease
Analysis of records for more than 63 million Medicare enrollees from 2000 to 2016 finds long-term exposure to air pollution had a significant impact on the number of people hospitalized for cardiac and respiratory conditions. Researchers examined three components of air pollution: fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Even levels lower than national standards affected heart and respiratory illnesses. (2021-02-22)

Structured exercise program, not testosterone therapy improved men's artery health
A 12-week, structured exercise program improved artery health and function in men ages 50 to 70 years old who had low to normal testosterone levels before the program began. Adding testosterone therapy to exercise or testosterone therapy alone did not improve artery health or function. (2021-02-22)

Should Uber and Lyft be electrifying more vehicles?
Increases in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions caused by ridesourcing impact human health and the environment--what happens when companies shoulder that cost? (2021-02-19)

Innovation predicts higher profits and stock returns
A large-scale study of the link between innovation and financial performance in Australian companies has found more innovative companies post higher future profits and stock returns. (2021-02-16)

Program led by health coaches at primary care clinics helped reduce heart risk
Patients who participated in a two-year, lifestyle intervention / weight-loss program with health coaches improved blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Blood sugar decrease and an increase in HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) were evident after the first 12 months of the program. (2021-02-09)

Chemists developed a simplified method for pharmaceutical compounds synthesizing
A team of chemists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University developed a simple and efficient method to synthesize tetrahydroisoquinolines--important organic molecules for drug discovery. The method consists of just three steps. (2021-02-09)

Shining a light on the true value of solar power
Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels. Michigan Tech renewable energy researchers show the opposite is actually true -- grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) owners are actually subsidizing their non-PV neighbors. (2021-02-09)

An end to invasive biopsies?
Hebrew Unievrsity researchers have found a less invasive and more accurate options for diagnoses using a simple blood test that detects DNA fragments. (2021-02-08)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Most vulnerable often overlooked in clinical trials of new treatments for COVID-19
Not only are studies of COVID-19 treatments being conducted at locations that don't typically care for high proportions of Black and Hispanic patients, the studies frequently exclude individuals with high-risk chronic ailments or who are pregnant. (2021-02-03)

Insulin can be stored out of refrigeration in hot settings!
Patients with diabetes must keep a supply of insulin which must respect the cold chain. However not every household has a refrigerator. This forces people living with diabetes to go to hospital on a daily basis. MSF and UNIGE test insulin storage at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 37°C. The findings demonstrate that the stability of insulin stored under these conditions is the same as that of cold-stored insulin, with no impact on efficacy. (2021-02-03)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

Age groups that sustain resurging COVID-19 epidemics in the United States
By late summer 2020, the resurgence of COVID-19 in the United States was largely driven by adults between the ages of 20 and 49, a new study finds. (2021-02-02)

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase risk of heart disease
An analysis of more than 1,000 women found that a history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) doubled the risk of heart artery calcification - a marker of increased risk for heart disease - many years after pregnancy, at the average age of 48, even if blood sugar returned to healthy levels. (2021-02-01)

Technology bolsters use of chia seeds to help improve health, slow signs of aging
A Purdue University team has developed and patented a method to separate mucilage from chia seeds, yielding a protein-rich chia seed flour with improved bioactivity and functionality compared with conventional methods. (2021-01-28)

New AI-severity score COVID-19 integrating CT images published to Nature Communications
Owkin, a French-American startup pioneering AI and Federated Learning in medical research, has been focusing it's COVID-19 research efforts on aspects of the pandemic that still require much public health attention, despite the arrival of an effective vaccine. Efforts to support frontline health systems as they devote their resources to the influx of COVID-19 related hospitalizations, have resulted in the AI-Severity Score, published in Nature Communications this week . (2021-01-28)

Drugs used to treat HIV and flu can have detrimental impact on crops
Scientists from the UK and Kenya found that lettuce plants exposed to a higher concentration of four commonly-used antiviral and antiretroviral medicines could be more than a third smaller in biomass than those grown in a drug-free environment. (2021-01-28)

People's acceptance of inequality affects response to company wrongdoings
People who do not accept inequality are more likely to negatively evaluate companies that have committed wrongdoings than people who do accept inequality, and this response varies by culture, according to researchers at Penn State. The team also found that companies can improve their standing with consumers when they offer sincere apologies and remedies for the harm they caused to victims. (2021-01-28)

Exercise-based cardiac rehab added to stroke recovery improved strength, cardiac endurance
In a small study, stroke survivors who completed a three-month cardiac rehabilitation program focused on aerobic exercise significantly improved their physical endurance and strength. Six months after the program more, 83.3% of participants reported that they continued exercising at least once a week. (2021-01-27)

Opertech Bio's pioneering approach to taste testing and measurement published in JPET
Opertech Bio, Inc., today announced the publication of a seminal research article describing the application of its pioneering TāStation® technology to the pharmacological characterization of human taste discrimination. The findings are published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, JPET. (2021-01-25)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers. (2021-01-19)

New tool removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems
'What goes in, must come out' is a familiar refrain. It is especially pertinent to the challenges facing UBC researchers who are investigating methods to remove chemicals and pharmaceuticals from public water systems. Cleaning products, organic dyes and pharmaceuticals are finding their ways into water bodies with wide-ranging negative implications to health and the environment, explains Dr. Mohammad Arjmand, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UBC Okanagan. (2021-01-18)

Acting quickly after heart attack symptoms start can be a heart saver
The degree of heart muscle damage from a heart attack is associated with how long it takes from when heart attack symptoms start to when patients receive an artery-clearing procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI. The longer the time period before PCI, called symptom-to-balloon time, the more significant and damaging the heart attack. (2021-01-14)

Smoking directly linked to a higher risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage
The relationship between smoking and risk of a serious type of bleeding stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) appeared to be linear, with risk of SAH increasing significantly among people considered heavy smokers. People with genetic variants that predisposed them to smoking behaviors have an increased risk of SAH by more than 60%. (2021-01-14)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations. Dubbed the ''Ocean 100'' by researchers at Duke University and Stockholm University, these ''blue economy'' companies collectively generated $1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. If the group were a country, it would have the world's 16th-largest economy, roughly equivalent to the gross domestic product (GDP) of Mexico. (2021-01-13)

SUTD develops new model of influence maximization
The model will enhance the robustness of networks to adversarial attacks and will benefit both practitioners and organizations. (2021-01-12)

Bacterium produces pharmaceutical all-purpose weapon
For some years, an active substance from the leaves of an ornamental plant has been regarded as a possible forerunner of a new group of potent drugs. So far, however, it has been very laborious to manufacture it in large quantities. That could now change: Researchers at the University of Bonn (Germany) have identified a bacterium that produces the substance and can also be easily cultivated in the laboratory. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-11)

Study reveals structure of protein and permits search for drugs against neglected diseases
Discovery by Brazilian scientists paves the way for the study of more potent molecules capable of directly destroying parasites underlying elephantiasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis, with fewer adverse side-effects. (2021-01-07)

Statins may protect the heart from chemotherapy treatment of early breast cancer
Women who take statins, the common cholesterol-lowering medication, during chemotherapy with anthracyclines for early-stage breast cancer are half as likely to require emergency department visits or hospitalization for heart failure in the 5 years after chemotherapy. (2021-01-06)

Businesses stand to benefit from sustainable restructuring
Is it profitable for a company to switch to sustainable production? Researchers conclude that it probably often is. (2021-01-06)

Investment risk & return from emerging public biotech companies comparable to non-biotech
Investing in biotech companies may not be any riskier than investing in other sectors, according to a new report from Bentley University's Center for Integration of Science and Industry. A large scale study of biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) from 1997-2016 demonstrates that these companies produced more than $100 billion in shareholder value and almost $100 billion in new value creation despite a failure rate greater than 50%. (2021-01-06)

Majority of biotech companies completing an IPO from 1997-2016 achieved product approvals
A large scale study from Bentley University of the biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings from 1997-2016 estimates that 78% of these companies are associated with products that reach phase 3 trials and 52% are associated with new product approvals. The article, titled 'Late-stage product development and approvals by biotechnology companies after IPO, 1997-2016,' shows that these emerging, public biotechnology companies continue to have a role in initiating new product development, but are no longer distinctively focused on novel, biological products. (2021-01-06)

Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone
People who smoked traditional cigarettes in addition to using e-cigarettes experienced health effects as harmful as those who smoked cigarettes exclusively; those effects are associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease and death. In a large data analysis of more than 7,100 U.S. adults, researchers examined the association of cigarette and e-cigarette use with inflammation and oxidative stress as biomarkers predicting cardiovascular disease. (2021-01-04)

NTU Singapore study suggests link between word choices and extraverts
A study by a team of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) psychologists has found a link between extraverts and their word choices. (2020-12-27)

Light smokers may not escape nicotine addiction, study reveals
Even people who consider themselves to be casual cigarette smokers may be addicted, according to current diagnostic criteria. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and Duke University found that many light smokers -- those who smoke one to four cigarettes per day or fewer -- meet the criteria for nicotine addiction and should therefore be considered for treatment. (2020-12-23)

Satellite data identifies companies fishing in high seas
A team of researchers, using satellite data and other analytical tools, has identified companies fishing in high seas--waters that lie outside of national jurisdiction where fishing has raised fears about environmental and labor violations. (2020-12-18)

Gene biomarkers indicate liver toxicity quickly and accurately
When agrochemical and pharmaceutical companies develop new products, they must test extensively for potential toxicity before obtaining regulatory approval. This testing usually involves lengthy and expensive animal studies. A research team at University of Illinois has developed a gene biomarker identification technique that cuts the testing process down to a few days while maintaining a high level of accuracy. (2020-12-18)

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease. The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease. The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy. (2020-12-17)

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