Current Phenomenon News and Events

Current Phenomenon News and Events, Phenomenon News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 15 | 575 Results
Swirlonic super particles baffle physicists
We report a novel state of active matter--a swirlonic state. It is comprised of swirlons, formed by groups of active particles orbiting their common center of mass. (2021-02-11)

Zebra stripes, leopard spots: frozen metal patterns defy conventional metallurgy
''Stripy zebra, spotty leopard...'' Pattern formation and pattern recognition entertains children and scientists alike. Alan Turing's 1950s model explaining patterns in two-substance systems is used by metallurgists to explain microscopic internal stripes and spots. A study out today explains exotic patterns, counter to Turing's theory, forming on the liquid metal gallium, which melts in the hand. The previously ignored surface-solidification phenomenon improves fundamental understanding of liquid-metal alloys, with a potential patterning tool, and advanced applications in future electronics and optics. (2021-01-18)

Spreading the sound
Tsukuba University scientists describe the diffusion of sound in disordered materials, such as glass, using a new mathematical model. This work may lead to stronger and cheaper displays for touchscreen devices. (2021-01-15)

Turbulent dynamics in the human brain could revolutionize the understanding of its functionality
According to a new study, published on 8 December in Cell Reports, by Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Morten L. Kringelbach, researcher at the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Oxford (United Kingdom) and the Center for Music in the Brain of the University of Aarhus (Denmark). (2021-01-12)

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body. A relatively new cancer research approach is the study of metabolites, the products of different steps in cancer cell metabolism, and how those substances interact. (2021-01-12)

Study reveals jellyfish create a 'virtual wall' to enhance performance
New discovery finds that Jellyfish create a ''ground effect,'' similar to how air squeezes between an airplane and ground during take-off, which builds pressure and a force that boosts performance. Never before has it been proven that an animal can create this phenomenon away from a solid boundary, let alone the open ocean. (2021-01-08)

Monkeys, like humans, persist at tasks they've already invested in
Humans are generally reluctant to give up on something they've already committed time and effort to. It's called the ''sunk costs'' phenomenon, where the more resources we sink into an endeavor, the likelier we are to continue--even if we sense it's futile. A new study shows that both capuchin monkeys and rhesus macaques are susceptible to the same behavior and that it occurs more often when the monkeys are uncertain about the outcome. (2020-12-18)

2D material controls light twice stronger
POSTECH research team identifies second-harmonics generation interference in 2D heterobilayers. (2020-12-17)

Traffic light system helps reduce clinical uncertainty, improve treatment decisions
A new study has found one in four clinical decisions made by physicians falls short of best practices, but when physicians reviewed a simple traffic light system prior to making a clinical decision, uncertainty was reduced by 70 per cent and treatment decisions improved. (2020-12-16)

Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the US. Finding the genes could enable new 'genetic control' methods for the weeds, which, in many places, no longer respond to herbicides. (2020-12-11)

Science of sandcastles is clarified, finally
Capillary condensation is a textbook phenomenon and omnipresent in our world. For example, children playing on the beach rely on this universal process to hold their sandcastles together. Despite its importance scientists have had to rely on an equation first set by the great Victorian physicist Lord Kelvin 150 years ago - but for the first time a Manchester team led by Nobel laureate Andre Geim can explain how the microscopic process actually works. (2020-12-09)

Experiment to test quantum gravity just got a bit less complicated
Is gravity a quantum phenomenon? That has been one of the big outstanding questions in physics for decades. Together with colleagues from the UK, Anupam Mazumdar, a physicist from the University of Groningen, proposed an experiment that could settle the issue. However, it requires studying two very large entangled quantum systems in freefall. In a new paper, Mazumdar presents a way to reduce background noise to make this experiment more manageable. (2020-12-08)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Analysis paves way for more sensitive quantum sensors
Theoretical researchers at Pritzker Molecular Engineering have found a way to make quantum sensors exponentially more sensitive by harnessing a unique physics phenomenon. (2020-11-16)

To avoid impression that SARS-CoV-2 transmission is ever-changing, interpret new info using existing
The global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has taken a variety of forms, ranging from localized and quickly controlled outbreaks to large, ongoing epidemics with deadly consequences. (2020-10-22)

Gut bacteria linked to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer
A new study suggests that gut bacteria are partially responsible for metabolic changes that lead to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment. If the composition of intestinal bacteria may predict which women will gain weight as a result of chemotherapy, researchers say they eventually hope to identify women at risk of gaining weight and offer methods to prevent it. (2020-10-21)

Climate patterns linked in Amazon, North and South America, study shows
University of Arkansas researchers developed a tree-ring chronology from the Amazon River basin that established a link between climate patterns in the Amazon and the Americas. (2020-10-09)

The Marangoni Effect can be used to obtain freshwater from the sea
A study conducted at the Politecnico di Torino, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, presents a solar desalination device capable of spontaneously removing the accumulated salt. In the future, this discovery could lead to the development of sustainable desalination systems with stable efficiencies over time (2020-10-08)

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats. (2020-10-03)

Babies' random choices become their preferences
When a baby reaches for one stuffed animal in a room filled with others just like it, that random choice is very bad news for those unpicked toys: the baby has likely just decided she doesn't like what she didn't choose. Researchers have known that adults build unconscious biases over a lifetime of choosing between things that are essentially the same, but finding that even babies do it demonstrates this way of justifying choice is fundamental to the human experience. (2020-10-02)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures. Although buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination, it has never been possible of measuring the tiny forces involved. This gap has finally been filled thanks to a study carried out by scientists from the University of Geneva. (2020-09-14)

More small-scale dark matter gravitational lenses than expected in galaxy clusters
The gravitational pull of cold dark matter in galaxy clusters can distort or bend the light coming from distant background galaxies, in a phenomenon called gravitational lensing. (2020-09-10)

To make a better sensor, just add noise
Adding noise to enhance a weak signal is a sensing phenomenon common in the animal world but unusual in manmade sensors. Now Penn State researchers have added a small amount of background noise to enhance very weak signals in a light source too dim to sense. (2020-09-03)

Surface deep: Light-responsive top layer of plastic film induces movement
Scientists show that only a thin, topmost layer of the light-dependent azobenzene-containing plastic film needs to be light-sensitive, rather than the entire film, opening up new ways to potentially reduce production costs and revolutionize its use. (2020-08-22)

A stepping stone for measuring quantum gravity
A group of theoretical physicists, including two physicists from the University of Groningen, have proposed a 'table-top' device that could measure gravity waves. However, their actual aim is to answer one of the biggest questions in physics: is gravity a quantum phenomenon? The key element for the device is the quantum superposition of large objects. Their design was published in New Journal of Physics on 6 August. (2020-08-18)

DNA damage triggers reprogramming into stem cells
A joint research team from the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Japan, Huazhong Agricultural University in China, and the Czech Academy of Sciences in the Czech Republic has discovered that DNA damage causes cell? to reprogram themselves into stem cells and regenerate new plant bodies in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The researchers describe this phenomenon as a unique environmental adaptation of plants. (2020-08-17)

Network of sounds: New research reveals the magic secret of human networks
A group of Israeli researchers recruited 16 violinists to study the behavior of a human network and find out what sets it apart from other networks, such as animals, computers and other objects. The results combine science and aesthetics and also evoke thoughts about the spread of the coronavirus. (2020-08-11)

From nanocellulose to gold
When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change colour under pressure, or convert light to heat. The research is published in Advanced Functional Materials. (2020-08-10)

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria
By making mice bioluminescent, EPFL scientists have found a way to monitor the activity of mitochondria in living organisms. (2020-08-10)

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic
A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-06)

A new look at Mars' eerie, ultraviolet nighttime glow
An astronaut standing on Mars couldn't see the planet's ultraviolet ''nightglow.'' But this phenomenon could help scientists to better predict the churn of Mars' surprisingly complex atmosphere. (2020-08-06)

Room temperature superconductivity creeping toward possibility
The possibility of achieving room temperature superconductivity took a tiny step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists. (2020-07-29)

Russian scientists have discovered a new physical paradox
Researchers from the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) discovered and theoretically explained a new physical effect: amplitude of mechanical vibrations can grow without external influence. Besides, the scientific group offered their explanation on how to eliminate the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox. (2020-07-13)

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)

Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins. An international team led by the joint research group of Prof. Dr. Matias Bargheer at HZB and the University of Potsdam has now observed experimentally for the first time how a special spin-lattice interaction in these iron-platinum thin films cancels out the thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. (2020-07-10)

Like humans, rats are less likely to help victims in the presence of unhelpful bystanders
A study in rats demonstrates that the bystander effect - a phenomenon in which individuals are less likely to help someone in need with other bystanders around - exists in a non-human species. Furthermore, while rats were less likely to rescue a rodent in need when surrounded by unhelpful bystanders, John Havlik and colleagues also observed that they were more likely to take action when their fellow bystanders were willing helpers. (2020-07-08)

Behind the dead-water phenomenon
What makes ships mysteriously slow down or even stop as they travel, even though their engines are working properly? This was first observed in 1893 and was described experimentally in 1904 without all the secrets of this ''dead water'' being understood. A French team has explained this phenomenon for the first time. (2020-07-06)

A path to new nanofluidic devices applying spintronics technology
Japanese scientists have elucidated the mechanism of the hydrodynamic power generation using spin currents in micrometer-scale channels, finding that power generation efficiency improves drastically as the size of the flow is made smaller. They experimentally demonstrated the fluid power generation phenomenon in the laminar flow region and confirmed that in the laminar flow region, energy conversion efficiency was increased by approximately 100,000 times. (2020-07-02)

Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic
Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. A new study, which has just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows that predators like wolf spiders respond to the changing conditions and have been able to produce two clutches of offspring during the short Arctic summer. The greater number of spiders may influence the food chains in Greenland. (2020-06-25)

Page 1 of 15 | 575 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.