Current Pheromone News and Events

Current Pheromone News and Events, Pheromone News Articles.
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Breakthrough in the fight against spruce bark beetles
For the first time, a research team led by Lund University in Sweden has mapped out exactly what happens when spruce bark beetles use their sense of smell to find trees and partners to reproduce with. The hope is that the results will lead to better pest control and protection of the forest in the future. (2021-02-16)

Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women - scientists have found. Researchers discovered a chemical made in the sex glands of the males of one species of tropical butterfly is identical to a chemical produced by flowers to attract butterflies. The study published in PLOS Biology today (19 January 2021) identified a gene for the first time. (2021-01-19)

Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds. (2021-01-19)

Honey bees fend off giant hornets with animal dung, U of G researchers discover
Researchers discovered honeybees in Vietnam collect and apply animal dung around hive entrances to deter deadly nest raids by giant hornets. This finding is the first to document the use of tools by honeybees. Researchers found the hornets spent less time and did less chewing at hives with moderate to heavy dung spotting. They were also less likely to launch mass attacks on the more heavily spotted hives. (2020-12-09)

The very hungry, angry caterpillars
In the absence of milkweed--their favorite food--monarch butterfly caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) go from peaceful feeders to aggressive fighters. Researchers reporting in the journal iScience on November 19 observed that caterpillars with less access to food were more likely to lunge at others to knock them aside, and caterpillars were most aggressive during the final stages before metamorphosis. (2020-11-19)

Rodent ancestors combined portions of blood and venom genes to make pheromones
Experts who study animal pheromones have traced the evolutionary origins of genes that allow mice, rats and other rodents to communicate through smell. The discovery is a clear example of how new genes can evolve through the random chance of molecular tinkering and may make identifying new pheromones easier in future studies. The results represent a genealogy for the exocrine-gland secreting peptide (ESP) gene family. (2020-09-30)

Reduce insecticide spraying by using ant pheromones to catch crop pests
Scientists at Bath have developed a molecular sponge that soaks up the pheromones of ants and releases them slowly to attract the pests to an insecticide trap. (2020-08-27)

Fighting like cats and dogs?
We are all familiar with the old adage ''fighting like cat and dog'', but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend. (2020-08-10)

Signal transduction in cells: Precise or economical?
A cellular signalling cascade balances information transmission against energy consumption. (2020-07-19)

Pine beetles successful no matter how far they roam -- with devastating effects
Whether they travel only a few metres or tens of kilometres to a new host tree, female pine beetles use different strategies to find success--with major negative consequences for pine trees, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2020-07-16)

A changing mating signal may initiate speciation in populations of Drosophila mojavensis
When choosing a mate, females of different subspecies of Drosophila mojavensis recognize the right mating partners either mainly by their song or by their smell. New species apparently evolve when the chemical mating signal is altered and when, in turn, the signal is reinterpreted by the opposite sex in the context of other signals, such as the courtship song. (2020-06-17)

How a male fly knows when to make a move on a mate
Like people, fruit flies must decide when conditions are right to make a move on a mate. Males use age and odors to gauge their chances of success, but how they do that on a molecular level was a mystery. The answer lies, in part, in their DNA. Researchers find that the scent of other flies and internal hormones alter the activity of a gene that controls how turned on male flies are by pheromones. (2020-05-22)

Rats give more generously in response to the smell of hunger
How do animals that help their brethren manage to prioritize those most in need? A study publishing March 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Karin Schneeberger and colleagues of the universities of Bern in Switzerland and Potsdam in Germany, shows that rats can use odor cues alone to determine how urgently to provide food assistance to other rats in need. (2020-03-24)

Butterflies can acquire new scent preferences and pass these on to their offspring
Two studies from the National University of Singapore demonstrate that insects can learn from their previous experiences and adjust their future behaviour for survival and reproduction. (2020-02-03)

Sex pheromone named for Jane Austen character alters brain in mouse courtship
The infamously aloof Mr. Darcy had a hard time attracting members of the opposite sex in Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice.' But the same cannot be said for a sex pheromone named for him, called darcin. In a new study, a Columbia University-led team of researchers has now uncovered the process by which this protein takes hold in the brains of female mice, giving brain cells the power to assess the mouse's sexual readiness and help her select a mate. (2020-01-29)

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms
Worcester Polytechnic Institute researchers have developed a laboratory tool that could speed up basic research for scientists working with the nematode C. elegans by tagging molecular receptors that are involved in sensing pheromones. The process was published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry journal. (2020-01-14)

How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5 million project
The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease in both dogs and humans. Insecticide-impregnated dog collars and dog culling are used in Brazil but instead, researchers used a 'lure to kill' method by attracting female flies towards insecticide using the male pheromome. This reduced female sandflies by 49% compared with 43% for the insecticide-only collar. (2019-12-05)

A new method is designed to stop the growth of a fungus that affects over a hundred crops
The study, published in Nature, was able to 'trick' the pathogen by artificially applying a pheromone involved in its reproduction (2019-09-30)

Catching evolution in the act
Researchers have produced some of the first evidence that shows that artificial selection and natural selection act on the same genes, a hypothesis predicted by Charles Darwin in 1859. (2019-09-26)

Burying beetle larvae know the best time to beg for food
It's easy to imagine an adult bird standing over youngsters with mouths open wide for a pre-mashed meal. It's more difficult to picture a beetle doing this, but the burying beetle Nicrophorus quadripunctatus feeds its young by the same mouth-to-mouth regurgitation technique. In a study published in iScience on September 11, 2019, researchers found that burying beetle larvae can sense when the mother beetles emit a pheromone, 2-phenoxyethanol, when they are ready to feed their young. (2019-09-11)

Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. Buchinger and others find that sexual selection may play a role in the evolution of lamprey pheromones. (2019-09-03)

Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach
The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta. (2019-07-19)

Survival of the zebrafish: Mate, or flee?
*Researchers have found that when making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose to mate rather than to flee from a threat. *The researchers identified specific brain regions associated with such decisions. *Understanding this basic biology is important when using zebrafish as a lab model for psychiatric diseases. (2019-07-18)

An AI technology to reveal the characteristics of animal behavior only from the trajectory
Recording the movements of people and animals has become easy because of small GPS devices and video cameras. However, the reasons for such movements remain difficult to infer. Yamazaki and colleagues have developed a flexible artificial intelligence technology to understand the movement of animals, ranging from roundworms in petri dishes to penguins in the Antarctic Ocean. This method may make it easier to understand animal movements as well as their underlying brain activities. (2019-07-16)

Aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in fish semen
An aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in the semen of sea lampreys attracts ready-to-mate females, according to a study publishing July 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Anne M. Scott of Michigan State University, Zhe Zhang of Shanghai Ocean University, and colleagues. (2019-07-09)

Pheromones and social status: Machos smell better
Male house mice are territorial and scent-mark their territories with urine -- and dominant, territorial males have much greater reproductive success than other males. A study conducted by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and published in Scientific Reports now shows that female mice display preferential olfactory attraction to the scent of dominant males, and that dominant males have higher pheromone production than subordinates. (2019-03-08)

Mothers use sex pheromones to veil eggs, preventing cannibalism
In a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology on Jan. 10, Sunitha Narasimha, Roshan Vijendravarma and colleagues report how fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), which lay eggs communally, use chemical deception to protect their eggs from being cannibalized by their own larvae. (2019-01-10)

Baby's tears and mom's libido
A substance in young mice's tears makes female mice more likely to reject male sexual advances. This research is part of ongoing efforts at the University of Tokyo to understand how animals communicate using chemicals called pheromones. Direct connections between human and mouse behavior cannot be made because pheromones are highly species specific. (2018-10-26)

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed. This discovery opens new avenues of research into the origin, evolution, and function of pheromone signaling. (2018-10-09)

Beetle adapts chemical mimicry to parasitize different bee species
A beetle that tricks bees into carrying it into their nests where it can live off their pollen, nectar and eggs adapts its deceptions to local hosts. (2018-09-11)

Discovery can help farmers combat stink bugs, save money on pest control
For stink bugs to attract a mate or to communicate that they have found food, they use their own chemical language: pheromones. Virginia Tech researchers have discovered insights into this chemical language, which can be used to develop alternative pest controls. (2018-08-20)

Fecal deposits reveal the fruit fly's pheromone flag
Fruit flies have a rich language of smell messages that they exchange, but now their secret is out. In a report published Aug. 2 in Current Biology, scientists were able to tap into the communications among freely interacting flies using a bioluminescent technology to monitor their brain activity. They discovered that males signal their presence by placing droppings that act as a calling card for flies to find each other and even lure females to designated locations. (2018-08-02)

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control
A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota and Western Michigan University have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration. The results, published in the current issue of PNAS, could lead to better ways to control sea lampreys. (2018-08-01)

Honeybee pheromones safely repel elephants, study finds
A study conducted at Greater Kruger National Park in South Africa found that a formulation that steadily released bee pheromones successfully repelled elephants, offering a potential management strategy to prevent elephants from trampling crops and causing other damage in places where humans and elephants are in conflict. (2018-07-23)

Fruit fly mating driven by a tweak in specific brain circuit
According to a new National Institutes of Health-funded study, it is not destiny that brings two fruit flies together, but an evolutionary matchmaker of sorts that made tiny adjustments to their brains' mating circuits, so they would be attracted to one another while rejecting advances from other, even closely-related, species. The results, published in Nature, may help explain how a specific female scent triggers completely different responses in different male flies. (2018-07-16)

The love lives of fruit flies
New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. The triad affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression. (2018-07-13)

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds
A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers. (2018-07-11)

Uncovering a hidden protein 'tail' that puts the brakes on cell signaling
Using an informatics tool that identifies (2018-05-07)

Mice 'eavesdrop' on rats' tear signal
Tears might not seem to have an odor. But studies have shown that proteins in tears act as pheromonal cues. For example, the tear glands of male mice produce a protein that makes females more receptive to sex. Research published in Current Biology on March 29 finds that rat tears contain proteins with similar functions. Mice can pick up on the rats' tear proteins, too, apparently tipping them off that predators are around. (2018-03-29)

Montana State researchers find that beetle odor could help tackle tamarisk
The Montana State University team found that a synthetic version of a pheromone produced by northern tamarisk beetles could be used to double the effectiveness of the beetles in controlling the invasive shrub. (2018-03-27)

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