Current Pheromones News and Events

Current Pheromones News and Events, Pheromones News Articles.
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In dueling ants vying to become queen, behavioral and molecular cues quickly determine who will win
In one species of ants, workers duel to establish new leadership after the death of their queen. While these sparring matches stretch for more than a month, changes in behavior and gene expression in the first three days of dueling can accurately predict who will triumph, according to a New York University study published in the journal Genes & Development. (2021-02-18)

Breakthrough in the fight against spruce bark beetles
For the first time, a research team led by Lund University in Sweden has mapped out exactly what happens when spruce bark beetles use their sense of smell to find trees and partners to reproduce with. The hope is that the results will lead to better pest control and protection of the forest in the future. (2021-02-16)

Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds. (2021-01-19)

Trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) to rewire your brain naturally
Researchers have found a new role for recently discovered neurotransmitter system that uses the trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) for neurotransmission. It has been observed that lack of TAAR5 in mice leads to a higher number of dopamine neurons and an increase in adult neurogenesis, i.e. the process by which new neurons are formed in the brain. (2020-11-10)

Rodent ancestors combined portions of blood and venom genes to make pheromones
Experts who study animal pheromones have traced the evolutionary origins of genes that allow mice, rats and other rodents to communicate through smell. The discovery is a clear example of how new genes can evolve through the random chance of molecular tinkering and may make identifying new pheromones easier in future studies. The results represent a genealogy for the exocrine-gland secreting peptide (ESP) gene family. (2020-09-30)

Reduce insecticide spraying by using ant pheromones to catch crop pests
Scientists at Bath have developed a molecular sponge that soaks up the pheromones of ants and releases them slowly to attract the pests to an insecticide trap. (2020-08-27)

Fighting like cats and dogs?
We are all familiar with the old adage ''fighting like cat and dog'', but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend. (2020-08-10)

Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that by detecting the plants' chemical defenses, the insects may have taken the lead. (2020-07-09)

Colony-level genetics predict gentle behavior in Puerto Rican honey bees
Puerto Rico's population of African-European hybrid honey bees (AHB) are famously known for being much gentler than their continental counterparts. Now Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have found that this reduced defending of the nest is determined by colony-level genetics as opposed to individual bee's DNA, according to a study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020-07-06)

An ant-inspired approach to mathematical sampling
In a paper published by the Royal Society, a team of Bristol researchers observed the exploratory behaviour of ants to inform the development of a more efficient mathematical sampling technique. (2020-06-19)

A changing mating signal may initiate speciation in populations of Drosophila mojavensis
When choosing a mate, females of different subspecies of Drosophila mojavensis recognize the right mating partners either mainly by their song or by their smell. New species apparently evolve when the chemical mating signal is altered and when, in turn, the signal is reinterpreted by the opposite sex in the context of other signals, such as the courtship song. (2020-06-17)

How a male fly knows when to make a move on a mate
Like people, fruit flies must decide when conditions are right to make a move on a mate. Males use age and odors to gauge their chances of success, but how they do that on a molecular level was a mystery. The answer lies, in part, in their DNA. Researchers find that the scent of other flies and internal hormones alter the activity of a gene that controls how turned on male flies are by pheromones. (2020-05-22)

A 'consciousness conductor' synchronizes and connects mouse brain areas
New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that slow-wave brain activity, a characteristic of sleep and resting states, is controlled by the claustrum. The synchronization of silent and active states across large parts of the brain by these slow waves could contribute to consciousness. (2020-05-11)

Virgin birth has scientists buzzing
In a study published today in Current Biology, researchers from University of Sydney have identified the single gene that determines how Cape honey bees reproduce without ever having sex. One gene, GB45239 on chromosome 11, is responsible for virgin births. (2020-05-07)

Male ring-tail lemurs exude fruity-smelling perfume from their wrists to attract mates
Humans aren't the only primates who like smelling nice for their dates. In the journal Current Biology on April 16, scientists report that male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) become more attractive to females by secreting a fruity and floral aroma from their wrists. Using detailed chemical analysis, the researchers identified three compounds responsible for this sweet scent, marking the first time that pheromones have been identified in a primate. (2020-04-16)

Odor experts uncover the smelly chemistry of lemur love
Three chemicals with floral, fruity scents are likely essential ingredients in the natural cologne male ring-tailed lemurs use to attract a mate. Experts in odor communication say these chemicals could be the first fully identified sex pheromones in primates. (2020-04-16)

Sex pheromone named for Jane Austen character alters brain in mouse courtship
The infamously aloof Mr. Darcy had a hard time attracting members of the opposite sex in Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice.' But the same cannot be said for a sex pheromone named for him, called darcin. In a new study, a Columbia University-led team of researchers has now uncovered the process by which this protein takes hold in the brains of female mice, giving brain cells the power to assess the mouse's sexual readiness and help her select a mate. (2020-01-29)

Researchers develop tool to identify molecular receptors in worms
Worcester Polytechnic Institute researchers have developed a laboratory tool that could speed up basic research for scientists working with the nematode C. elegans by tagging molecular receptors that are involved in sensing pheromones. The process was published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry journal. (2020-01-14)

A single gene for scent reception separates two species of orchid bees
Orchid bees are master perfumers. Males collect chemicals to concoct perfumes unique to their specific species. In a study appearing in Nature Communications, UC Davis researchers link the evolution of sexual signaling in orchid bees to a single gene shaped by species' perfume preferences. (2020-01-13)

Plants found to speak roundworm's language
Nematodes are tiny, ubiquitous roundworms that infect plant roots, causing more than $100 billion in crop damage worldwide each year. New research has found that plants enter into a 'chemical dialog' with the worms to repel infestations, providing insights into how farmers could fight these pests. (2020-01-10)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting
Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. These invasive pests have painful stings that, in some cases, can cause serious medical problems, such as hypersensitivity reactions, infections and even kidney failure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified pyridine alkaloids that, along with other venom components, could contribute to these conditions. (2019-10-16)

A new method is designed to stop the growth of a fungus that affects over a hundred crops
The study, published in Nature, was able to 'trick' the pathogen by artificially applying a pheromone involved in its reproduction (2019-09-30)

Scientists in New York City discover a valuable method to track rats
A new paper in The Journal of Urban Ecology, published by Oxford University Press, finds that rats can be baited to, or repelled from, locations using pheromones found in the scents of other rats. (2019-09-17)

Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. Buchinger and others find that sexual selection may play a role in the evolution of lamprey pheromones. (2019-09-03)

Male black widows piggyback on work of rivals in a desperate attempt to find a mate
A new U of T study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate. (2019-08-02)

Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach
The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta. (2019-07-19)

Survival of the zebrafish: Mate, or flee?
*Researchers have found that when making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose to mate rather than to flee from a threat. *The researchers identified specific brain regions associated with such decisions. *Understanding this basic biology is important when using zebrafish as a lab model for psychiatric diseases. (2019-07-18)

Aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in fish semen
An aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in the semen of sea lampreys attracts ready-to-mate females, according to a study publishing July 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Anne M. Scott of Michigan State University, Zhe Zhang of Shanghai Ocean University, and colleagues. (2019-07-09)

Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior
Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviors of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute. (2019-05-20)

A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in the brain are also reflected in the behavior of the flies. This helps them to avoid spoiled or infected food sources, which would have fatal consequences for the flies and their offspring. (2019-03-15)

Pheromones and social status: Machos smell better
Male house mice are territorial and scent-mark their territories with urine -- and dominant, territorial males have much greater reproductive success than other males. A study conducted by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and published in Scientific Reports now shows that female mice display preferential olfactory attraction to the scent of dominant males, and that dominant males have higher pheromone production than subordinates. (2019-03-08)

The first walking robot that moves without GPS
Desert ants are extraordinary solitary navigators. Researchers at CNRS and Aix-Marseille University, in the Institut des Sciences du Mouvement -- √Čtienne Jules Marey (ISM), were inspired by these ants as they designed AntBot, the first walking robot that can explore its environment randomly and go home automatically, without GPS or mapping. This work, published on Feb. 13, 2019, in Science Robotics, opens up new strategies for navigation in autonomous vehicles and robotics. (2019-02-13)

Termites shape and are shaped by their mounds
Termite construction projects have no architects, engineers or foremen, and yet these centimeter-sized insects build complex, meter-sized structures all over the world. Harvard researchers demonstrate how simple rules linking environmental physics and animal behavior can give rise to these structures. Their research sheds lights on broader questions of swarm intelligence and may serve as inspiration for designing more sustainable human architecture. (2019-02-11)

Mothers use sex pheromones to veil eggs, preventing cannibalism
In a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology on Jan. 10, Sunitha Narasimha, Roshan Vijendravarma and colleagues report how fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), which lay eggs communally, use chemical deception to protect their eggs from being cannibalized by their own larvae. (2019-01-10)

Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite
Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. Completing the SHB genome takes on even more importance when you realize that among the SHB's close relatives are the destructive and invasive Asian longhorned beetle. (2018-12-20)

Deciphering infanticide
It may seem like one of the cruelest aspects of the natural world, but a new study is pinpointing the suite of factors, including the shape of the pup and a specific set of olfactory signals, or pheromones, that trigger infanticide in mice. (2018-12-18)

Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior
Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviors controlled? (2018-12-13)

Smelling the forest - - not the trees
New study by the University of Konstanz: Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient. (2018-12-11)

Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells
Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed. (2018-12-10)

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