Current Philadelphia News and Events

Current Philadelphia News and Events, Philadelphia News Articles.
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CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C
In a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) describe the array of rashes seen in MIS-C patients at their hospital through late July 2020, providing photos and information that could help doctors diagnose future cases. (2021-02-22)

Temple-Led Team: COVID containment measures in Philly associated with rise in gun violence
A team led by Dr. Jessica H. Beard, Assistant Professor of Surgery and Director of Trauma Research at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, sought to determine the magnitude of Philadelphia's increase in firearm violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. They also aimed to understand potential causes of the increase by trying to pinpoint when the increase occurred. (2021-02-10)

Mailing it in: Getting the word out on getting the ballots in
As the pandemic forced states across the nation to transform the way their residents voted in 2020, a new study by Daniel Hopkins and Marc Meredith of the University of Pennsylvania showed that an inexpensive postcard campaign conducted during Philadelphia's primary was able to boost mail-in voting. (2021-02-02)

Researchers demonstrate how defects in mitochondria may lead to autism spectrum disorder
Researchers have demonstrated that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be caused by defects in the mitochondria of brain cells. (2021-02-01)

Assessment of maternal, neonatal cord blood SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, placental transfer ratios
Maternally derived antibodies are a key element of neonatal immunity. This study examined the association between maternal and neonatal SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody concentrations because understanding the dynamics of maternal antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy and subsequent transplacental antibody transfer can inform neonatal management as well as maternal vaccination strategies. (2021-01-29)

Newly licensed autistic drivers crash less than other young drivers
A collaborative study found that compared with their non-autistic peers, young autistic drivers have lower rates of moving violations and license suspensions, as well as similar to lower crash rates. (2021-01-28)

Opiate overdoses spike in black Philadelphians, but drop in white residents since COVID-19
New research into opioid overdoses that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted new disparities along racial lines that are likely fueled by existing inequality (2021-01-21)

Racial/ethnic disparities in unintentional EMS-attended opioid overdoses during COVID-19 pandemic
Associations of the COVID-19 pandemic with overdoses among racial/ethnic groups in Philadelphia are described in this observational study. (2021-01-21)

CHOP researchers Find NTRK fusions more common than expected in pediatric tumors
Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors. (2021-01-15)

Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaired by Michael J. Fisher, MD at CHOP, were published recently in Nature Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before birth. (2021-01-13)

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt. (2021-01-11)

Long-term study finds dozens of new genetic markers associated with lifetime bone growth
A multidisciplinary team of researchers has discovered several genetic markers associated with bone mineral accrual, which could ultimately help identify causes of eventual osteoporosis earlier in life through genetic testing. (2021-01-06)

Successful pilot integrates PrEP and syringe exchange services
A new study shows that implementing PrEP distribution within a community-based syringe services program gets the medication into the hands of women who inject drugs -- a population disproportionately impacted by HIV. (2020-12-16)

Behavioral strategies to promote a national COVID-19 vaccine program
National efforts to develop a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at 'warp speed' will likely yield a safe and effective vaccine by early 2021. However, this important milestone is only the first step in an equally important challenge: getting a majority of the U.S. public vaccinated. (2020-12-14)

Elevated biomarker for blood vessel damage found in all children with SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found elevated levels of a biomarker related to blood vessel damage in children with SARS-CoV-2 infection, even if the children had minimal or no symptoms of COVID-19. They also found that a high proportion of children with SARS-CoV-2 infection met clinical and diagnostic criteria for thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). (2020-12-08)

Study finds no change in preterm birth or stillbirth in Philadelphia during pandemic
Despite early reports suggesting a decline in preterm births during the COVID-19 pandemic period, an analysis by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found no change in preterm births or stillbirths at two Philadelphia hospitals in the first four months of the pandemic. The findings, published today in JAMA, resulted from the examination of an ongoing, racially-diverse pregnancy cohort that assesses both spontaneous and medically-indicated preterm birth. (2020-12-07)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents
More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals. (2020-12-01)

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (2020-11-24)

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. (2020-11-23)

Experts issue recommendations for equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccine
A group of vaccine experts led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has published recommendations to ensure equitable distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available. The framework, published today in Heath Affairs, focuses on five principles the authors believe would strengthen the current immunization delivery system to ensure equitable access to everyone for whom vaccination is recommended. (2020-11-19)

Racial disparities in pediatric diabetes treatment
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes. (2020-11-12)

CHOP genomic study reveals role for hypothalamus in inflammatory bowel disease
Using sophisticated 3D genomic mapping and integrating with public data resulting from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found significant genetic correlations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and stress and depression. (2020-10-29)

Media's reporting on gun violence does not reflect reality, study finds
When looking at media reports in three cities, half of victims were covered in the news, but a disproportionate amount of attention was given to less common circumstances and victims. (2020-10-19)

Trees prefer the big city life
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests in Newark, Del., and Philadelphia, Pa. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less urbanization in Newark. (2020-10-16)

Black police officers disciplined disproportionately for misconduct, IU research finds
An examination of racial differences in the disciplining of police officers in three of the largest U.S. cities consistently found that Black officers were more frequently disciplined for misconduct than White officers, despite an essentially equal number of allegations being leveled. This included allegations of severe misconduct. (2020-10-12)

15-year trend persists in disparate insulin pump use in children
Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology. (2020-10-01)

More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents. (2020-09-29)

Can mobile tech offer new pathways to improve recovery from serious traumatic injuries?
Serious traumatic injuries are a health event that can begin a trajectory toward chronic health and social challenges. Research on patient outcomes following traumatic injuries establishes the pervasive nature of injuries' long-term consequences in physical, psychological, social and economic well-being, which may persist months and even years after an injury hospitalization. In light of this research, emerging interventions have targeted enhanced and coordinated healthcare services to support recovery and address patients' long-term rehabilitative needs. (2020-09-29)

Researchers identify 'druggable' signaling pathway that stimulates lung tissue repair
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a cellular pathway that can be targeted with a naturally occurring drug to stimulate lung tissue regeneration, which is necessary for recovery from multiple lung injuries. The findings, which were published today in Nature Cell Biology, could lead to better therapies for patients with lung disease, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19. (2020-09-28)

Handheld device could provide fast method to diagnose concussions in youth athletes
Building upon years of research, a new study has demonstrated how a specific assessment of the eye could someday help properly diagnosis and monitor concussions. (2020-09-24)

ADHD study reveals unique genetic differences in African American patients
Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition. (2020-09-22)

CHOP researchers find MIS-C associated with myocardial injury
Using sensitive parameters to assess cardiac function, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that cardiac involvement in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) differs from Kawasaki disease (KD) and is associated with myocardial injury. The findings were published recently in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-09-21)

Virtual reality trains public to reverse opioid overdoses
The United States has seen a 200% increase in the rate of deaths by opioid overdose in the last 20 years. But many of these deaths were preventable. Naloxone, also called Narcan, is a prescription drug that reverses opioid overdoses, and in more than 40 states -- including Pennsylvania -- there is a standing order policy, which makes it available to anyone, without an individual prescription from a healthcare provider. (2020-09-14)

Small study shows convalescent plasma is safe to use in pediatric patients with COVID-19
Early findings from researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) show that convalescent plasma appears to be a safe and possibly effective treatment for children with life-threatening cases of COVID-19. The results were published online Friday by the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer. (2020-09-08)

Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The challenges of managing multiple doses of daily insulin administration, blood glucose monitoring, dietary and exercise requirements, can make self-care difficult and complicate outcomes. Adolescents with T1DM often have poorer diabetes outcomes than others, indicating that glucose control is difficult for them to maintain. (2020-09-03)

Study finds younger and older drivers more likely to drive older, less safe vehicles
A new study found that teen drivers and drivers 65 years and older - two age groups at a higher risk of being involved in an automobile accident - are more likely to be driving vehicles that are less safe, putting them at even higher risk of injury. The findings underscore the need for these groups to prioritize driving the safest vehicle they can afford. (2020-08-27)

Fewer serious asthma events in Philadelphia area following COVID-19 stay-at-home orders
Philadelphia and its surrounding counties issued a series of ''stay-at-home'' orders on March 17, 2020 in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19. In the months that followed, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) saw a marked decrease in healthcare visits for both outpatient and hospitalized asthma patients. New research from CHOP and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania suggests the cause may have been fewer rhinovirus infections due to masking, social distancing, and hygiene measures. (2020-08-20)

Study finds signs of altruism in people's COVID-19 worries
A new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract COVID-19 or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study, conducted by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, also shows how increased resilience is able to reduce rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic. (2020-08-20)

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