Current Phthalates News and Events

Current Phthalates News and Events, Phthalates News Articles.
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Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
New research suggests that more than 100 chemicals found in plastic toy materials may pose possible health risks to children. The study provides findings that may lead to stricter international regulations. (2021-02-22)

Researchers find connection between household chemicals and gut microbiome
A team of researchers for the first time has found a correlation between the levels of bacteria and fungi in the gastrointestinal tract of children and the amount of common chemicals found in their home environment. The work, published this month in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, could lead to better understanding of how these semi-volatile organic compounds may affect human health. (2020-11-12)

A better alternative to Phthalates?
In collaboration with the Medical University of South Carolina, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) analyzed urine samples from pregnant women to look for the presence of DINCH, which is short for di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate. They found concentrations of DINCH in most of the urine samples but no evidence of effects in lab assays on two hormones, progesterone and estrogen. (2020-09-25)

Growth hormone plays key role in early puberty, breast cancer risk
Girls who enter puberty early in life--as measured by early breast development and age of first menstrual period--have a longer window of susceptibility to breast cancer. This window stays propped open for too long because their bodies have higher concentrations of growth hormone and they experience a slower progression ('tempo') during puberty. (2020-09-01)

Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales
Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a white-beaked dolphin and in Gervais' beaked whales. (2020-08-06)

Exposure to environmental chemicals may disrupt sleep during menopause
For menopausal women who have difficulty sleeping, it might be because of chemicals in the environment. A new study based on data from the Midlife Women's Health Study suggests that exposure to various chemicals, such as phthalates, found in hundreds of products used daily, is associated with sleep disruptions in midlife women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-07-29)

Air pollution, smoking and built environment are associated with an increase risk of childhood obesity
173 exposures analysed in first major study to assess risk of obesity in childhood using an exposome-wide approach. (2020-06-24)

Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health. (2020-06-01)

Environmental contaminants alter gut microbiome, health
The microbes that inhabit our bodies are influenced by what we eat, drink, breathe and absorb through our skin, and most of us are chronically exposed to natural and human-made environmental contaminants. In a new paper, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign review the research linking dozens of environmental chemicals to changes in the gut microbiome and associated health challenges. (2020-05-21)

Investigating association between preconception exposure to plastics, risk of preterm birth
Researchers used urinary measures of biomarkers of phthalates (a group of chemicals used in plastics) and phthalate substitutes from couples undergoing fertility care and examined if higher concentrations prior to conception were associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. (2020-04-07)

Prenatal phthalate exposure associated with autistic traits in young boys
Exposure in the womb to phthalates, a group of endocrine-disrupting chemicals present in cosmetics and other common household products, was associated with autistic traits in boys, ages 3 and 4, but not in girls, according to a new study led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental epidemiologist. (2020-02-19)

Common plasticizer disrupts C. elegans egg production
A new study published Jan. 9 in PLOS Genetics by Mónica Colaiácovo of Harvard Medical School and colleagues reports that the most commonly used plasticizer, diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), leads to fertility problems by causing an excess number of breaks in the DNA during egg production, and then interfering with the repair systems that fixes the breaks. (2020-01-09)

Break point
Experiments in worms reveal the molecular damage caused by DEHP, a chemical commonly used to make plastics flexible. DEHP interferes with proper cell division during egg formation, leads to excessive DNA breakage, alters chromosome appearance. Abnormalities help explain known link between DEHP and human birth defects, male infertility. If replicated in further research, the insights can help inform regulatory changes, consumer choice. (2020-01-09)

Plasticizers may contribute to motor control problems in girls
Scientists at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) have uncovered a link between prenatal exposure to phthalates--a ubiquitous group of plasticizers and odor-enhancing chemicals--and deficits in motor function in girls. Phthalates are widely used in consumer products from plastic toys to household building materials to shampoos and are thought to disrupt endocrine function, and possibly interfere with brain development in utero. (2020-01-06)

Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated
Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bispehnol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed. The study provides the first evidence that the measurements relied upon by regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration, are flawed, underestimating exposure levels by as much as 44 times. (2019-12-05)

Stress, plastic additives in late pregnancy raise risk of premature birth
Women exposed simultaneously to stress and plastic additives late in pregnancy are at increased risk for premature birth, according to a study by Rutgers and other institutions. (2019-11-14)

Bisphenol-a structural analogues may be less likely than BPA to disrupt heart rhythm
Some chemical alternatives to plastic bisphenol-a (BPA), which is still commonly used in medical settings such as operating rooms and intensive care units, may be less disruptive to heart electrical function than BPA, according to a pre-clinical study that explored how the structural analogues bisphenol-s (BPS) and bisphenol-f (BPF) interact with the chemical and electrical functions of heart cells. (2019-11-14)

Chemicals in consumer products during early pregnancy related to lower IQ
Exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy to mixtures of suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in consumer products is related to lower IQ in children by age 7, according to a study by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Karlstad University, Sweden, published in Environment International in October. This study is among the first to look at prenatal suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical mixtures in relation to neurodevelopment. (2019-10-24)

Plasticizer interaction with the heart
A new study, 'Plasticizer Interaction With the Heart,' led by researchers at Children's National Health System appears in the July issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology and examines the potential role plastic exposure, akin to exposure in a medical setting, has on heart rhythm disruptions. (2019-07-22)

Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
Phthalates are used by industry in plastic products. Their toxic effect on the endocrine system is worrying. Indeed, the exposure of male foetuses to phthalates can have devastating consequences for the fertility. However, researchers (UNIGE/HUG) show that phthalate susceptibility depends largely on the genetic heritage of each individual. These results raise the question of individual vulnerability and the possible transmission to future generations of epigenetic changes that should normally be erased during foetal development. (2019-06-13)

Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents
After Oregon State University researchers deployed chemicals to individuals on three continents, they found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections. But the same 14 chemicals were detected in more than 50 percent of the wristbands returned from the United States, Africa and South America. (2019-04-22)

A dust-up: Microbes interact with harmful chemicals in dust
A new study indicates that the microbes we track into buildings--the microscopic bacteria and other microorganisms that thrive on our skin and outdoors--can help break down harmful chemicals in household dust. (2019-04-10)

Endocrine Society commends reinvigorated effort to regulate chemicals in personal care products
The Endocrine Society applauded the reintroduction of a Senate bill that would give government regulators needed authority to protect consumers from exposure to hazardous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in cosmetics and other personal care products. (2019-03-08)

Prenatal exposure to plastics linked to motor skill deficiencies at age 11
Scientists with the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report motor skills problems in children exposed during pregnancy to plasticizer chemicals known as phthalates that are widely used in personal care products like moisturizers and lipstick, as well as plastic containers and children's toys. (2019-02-21)

Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture
Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new Duke University-led research. The researchers presented their findings Feb. 17 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-17)

Large study fails to link phthalates and increased breast cancer risk
In the largest study to date on phthalates and postmenopausal breast cancer, a University of Massachusetts Amherst cancer epidemiology researcher found no association between breast cancer risk and exposure to the plasticizing and solvent chemicals used in such common products as shampoo, makeup, vinyl flooring, toys, medical devices and car interiors. (2019-02-12)

Phthalates may impair fertility in female mice
A phthalate found in many plastic and personal care products may decrease fertility in female mice, a new study found. Researchers at the University of Illinois found that giving female mice oral doses of the phthalate DiNP for 10 days disrupted their estrus cycles, decreasing their ability to become pregnant for up to nine months afterward. (2019-02-07)

Exposure to chemicals before and after birth is associated with a decrease in lung function
A European study, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, analyses for the first time the impact of the exposome on respiratory health. (2019-02-05)

Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure
New study analyses the health impact of exposure to 21 non-persistent chemicals among pregnant women (2019-01-18)

Microplastics and plastic additives discovered in ascidians all along Israel's coastline
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that microplastics -- tiny pieces of plastic ingested by aquatic life -- are present in solitary ascidians, sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders, all along the Israeli coastline. The research also confirmed the presence of plastic additives, i.e. 'plasticizers,' in ascidians. (2019-01-03)

Prenatal exposure to chemicals in personal care products may speed puberty in girls
Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Researchers found that daughters of mothers who had higher levels of diethyl phthalate and triclosan in their bodies during pregnancy experienced puberty at younger ages. (2018-12-03)

UCSC chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics
Researchers have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics. Phthalates leach out of plastics into food, water, and the environment, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that phthalate exposure can lead to a variety of health problems. The new chemicals are effective as plasticizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) but can't leach out of PVC products because they are chemically bonded to the polymer chain. (2018-10-31)

Exposure to organochlorine pesticides in the womb linked to poorer lung function in childhood
Babies exposed to higher levels of organochlorine compounds in the womb go on to have worse lung function in childhood, according to new research presented today (Tuesday) at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. These compounds, which include the pesticide DDT, as well as electrical insulators and other industrial products, are now banned in most parts of the world. However, because they degrade very slowly, they are still present in the environment and in foods. (2018-09-17)

BPA replacements in plastics cause reproductive problems in lab mice
Twenty years ago, researchers made the accidental discovery that BPA had leached out of plastic cages used to house female mice in the lab, causing an increase in chromosomally abnormal eggs. Now, the same team is back to report in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 13 that the array of alternative bisphenols now used to replace BPA in BPA-free bottles, cups, cages, and other items appear to come with similar problems for their mice. (2018-09-13)

Endocrine disruptors found in bottlenose dolphins
Evidence of exposure to phthalates, chemical compounds used in hundreds of consumer products, has been found in resident bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida. Some phthalates have been linked to reproductive problems in humans. (2018-09-05)

In rats, perinatal exposure to phthalates impairs brain structure and function
Rats exposed in the womb and during lactation to plasticizing chemicals known as phthalates had fewer neurons and synapses than those that were not exposed, researchers report in a new study. The phthalate-exposed rats had reductions in the size of their medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region that regulates behavior, and showed deficits in cognitive flexibility. The variety of phthalates and quantities used in the study were environmentally relevant to human exposures, researchers said. (2018-07-18)

Plastic chemical linked to smaller prefrontal cortex, reduced cognitive ability in rats
Adult rats that had been exposed before birth and during nursing to a mixture of chemicals found in a wide range of consumer products have a smaller medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and perform worse on an attention-switching task than rats not exposed to the chemicals early in life. These findings, published in JNeurosci, demonstrate a long-term influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds on brain development. (2018-07-16)

Hair products for black women contain mix of hazardous ingredients
A new report shows that black women are potentially exposed to dozens of hazardous chemicals through the hair products they use. This is the first study to measure concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a variety of hair products marketed at black women. The findings could help researchers understand why black women have higher exposures to hazardous chemicals than other groups and how these elevated exposures contribute to health disparities in the US population. (2018-04-25)

Dining out associated with increased exposure to harmful chemicals called Phthalates
Dining out more at restaurants, cafeterias and fast-food outlets may boost total levels of potentially health-harming chemicals called phthalates in the body, according to a study out today. (2018-03-28)

An underestimated threat: Land-based pollution with microplastics
Tiny plastic particles also present a threat to creatures on land and may have damaging effects similar or even more problematic than in our oceans. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and their Berlin colleagues warn: the impact of microplastics in soils, sediments and the freshwaters could have a long-term negative effect on terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world. (2018-02-05)

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