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Current Physical Symptoms News and Events, Physical Symptoms News Articles.
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High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood. (2021-01-13)

Study find physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Anisovolumetric weathering is much more common than previously thought, and variations in this process can be explained by climate and erosion. (2021-01-13)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

The three days pregnancy sickness is most likely to start pinpointed
Researchers from the University of Warwick have narrowed the time frame that nausea and vomiting during pregnancy will potentially start to just three days for most women, opening up the possibility for scientists to identify a biological cause for the condition. (2021-01-12)

Metabolism may play role in recurrent major depression
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Dutch scientists, have found that certain metabolites -- small molecules produced by the process of metabolism -- may be predictive indicators for persons at risk for recurrent major depressive disorder. (2021-01-12)

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

More than half of people using cannabis for pain experience multiple withdrawal symptoms
More than half of people who use medical marijuana products to ease pain also experience clusters of multiple withdrawal symptoms when they're between uses, a new study finds. And about 10% of the patients taking part in the study experienced worsening changes to their sleep, mood, mental state, energy and appetite over the next two years as they continued to use cannabis. (2021-01-08)

New tech helping cancer patients manage symptoms
Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial by the University of Leeds. Patients tested the eRAPID system which allowed them to report online symptoms from home and receive instant advice on whether to self-manage or seek medical attention. (2021-01-08)

Smoking associated with increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms
Smoking is associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms and smokers are more likely to attend hospital than non-smokers, a study has found. (2021-01-06)

Analysis of SARS-CoV-2 immune response several months post-infection hints at protective immunity
Researchers who studied antibody and immune cell responses in more than 180 men and women who had recovered from COVID-19 report these patients' immune memory to the virus - across all immune cell types studied - was measurable for up to 8 months after symptoms appeared. (2021-01-06)

Diet and lifestyle guidelines can greatly reduce gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms
Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition affecting 30% of the US population and often controlled with medication. While doctors commonly recommend specific dietary and lifestyle changes to control symptoms, there is little evidence about their effectiveness. Results of a large-scale study suggest such changes, including regular exercise, can reduce symptoms substantially. (2021-01-05)

One psychedelic experience may lessen trauma of racial injustice
A single positive experience on a psychedelic drug may help reduce stress, depression and anxiety symptoms in Black, Indigenous and people of color whose encounters with racism have had lasting harm, a new study suggests. (2020-12-28)

Clowns may help children cope with the pain and anxiety of hospital treatment
Hospital clowns might help improve physical symptoms and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents having treatment for acute or chronic conditions, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Individuals with high ADHD-traits are more vulnerable to insomnia
Individuals with high ADHD-traits that do not meet the criteria for a diagnosis are less able to perform tasks involving attentional regulation or emotional control after a sleepless night than individuals with low ADHD-traits, a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports. (2020-12-16)

Telemedicine needed to diagnose and treat dysphagia in COVID-19 patients, doctors say
COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the disease, have caused health care providers to change how they treat patients. Clinicians are now frequently using telemedicine to see their patients for routine checkups, saving office visits for emergencies. The same goes for rehabilitation. (2020-12-15)

Otago study identifies 'three pillars' of good mental health for young adults
Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a University of Otago study has found. (2020-12-15)

Dallas Heart Study yields new insights about depression
Recently published UT Southwestern research reveals new insights about risk factors for depression based on data from a landmark longitudinal study focused on heart disease. (2020-12-14)

Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy -- a lack of interest or motivation -- could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-14)

Low blood pressure during hemodialysis may indicate peripheral vascular disease
Using a large nationwide registry of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases found that higher frequency of low blood pressure episodes during hemodialysis was associated with a higher incidence of diagnosed peripheral arterial disease. (2020-12-11)

Promising treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, PMDD
The mental symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder improve following treatment with a progesterone receptor modulator, as demonstrated by SciLifeLab researcher Erika Comasco and Professor Inger Sundström-Poromaa, Uppsala University. The mechanism of action of the study drug provides insights into the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this psychiatric disorder and its treatment. (2020-12-10)

Psychiatric disorders explain increased risk for self-harm in autism spectrum disorders
A population-based study revealed reasons behind elevated suicide risk, attempted suicides, and other self-harm, which require special health care, among adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Comorbid disorders, especially non-affective psychoses and affective and anxiety disorders, explained the risk. (2020-12-10)

Physicians don't always recognize patients' radiation therapy side effects
Physicians did not recognize side effects from radiation therapy in more than half of breast cancer patients who reported a significant symptom, a new study finds. (2020-12-09)

Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

COVID-19: persistent symptoms in one third of cases
A team of physicians and epidemiologists from the University of Geneva the University Hospitals of Geneva and the General Health Directorate of the State of Geneva followed nearly 700 people who tested positive for SARS-COV2 but did not require hospitalisation. Six weeks after diagnosis, 33% of them still reported suffering from fatigue, loss of smell or taste, shortness of breath or cough. These results call for better communication, reminding that SARS-CoV-2 infection is not trivial. (2020-12-08)

Research reveals how COVID-19 affects the eyes
Sore eyes are the most significant vision-based indicator of COVID-19, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Ophthalmology. (2020-12-08)

Study: Bartonella infection associated with psychiatric symptoms and skin lesions
Bartonella bacteria are increasingly recognized as an emerging infectious disease threat. A new study has found additional instances of Bartonella infection in humans who exhibited neuropsychiatric symptoms, a subset of whom also had skin lesions. (2020-12-08)

Steep rise in depressive symptoms among 7-12 year olds during UK-wide lockdown
The prevalence of depressive symptoms rose substantially among young children during the UK-wide lockdown in response to the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, finds research focusing on one region of England and published online in Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2020-12-08)

Significant increase in depression seen among children during first UK lockdown
The first lockdown led to a significant increase in symptoms of depression among children, highlighting the unintended consequences of school closures, according to a new study from the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-08)

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-12-07)

Caregiver burden in dementia during the COVID19 crisis
Caregivers of people with dementia and milder forms of neurocognitive disorder bear a heavy burden. They are constantly confronted with challenging symptoms and behaviors and feel they are up against their limits. The latest results from a study indicate that the COVID 19 crisis affects this burden since the pandemic has mental health implications (2020-12-07)

Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood. (2020-12-04)

PTSD with depression may significantly increase risk of early death in women
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression have an almost fourfold greater risk of early death than women without trauma exposure or depression. The findings are particularly relevant during the current pandemic, which is exposing many women to unusually high levels of stress. (2020-12-04)

New CCNY-developed resource measures severity of work-related depression
First came their pioneering research a few years ago linking burnout and depression. Now CCNY psychologist Irvin Schonfeld and his University of Neuchâtel collaborator Renzo Bianchi present the Occupational Depression Inventory [ODI], a measure designed to quantify the severity of work-attributed depressive symptoms and establish provisional diagnoses of job-ascribed depression. (2020-12-04)

Study finds over 64% of people reported new health issues during 'work from home'
In a new study, researchers have found that working from home has negatively impacted our physical health and mental health, increased work expectations and distractions, reduced our communications with co-workers and ultimately lessened our productivity. The study finds that time spent at the workstation increased by approximately 1.5 hours. It also illustrates the differential impact of working from home for women, parents, and those with higher income (2020-12-03)

Physical activity key to helping reduce menopause symptoms
CLEVELAND, Ohio (December 2, 2020)--Women being treated for cancer often experience menopause quite suddenly with common symptoms, such as hot flashes, amplified more than had menopause occurred naturally. A new study suggests that the intensity and volume of physical activity could mitigate some of those symptoms. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-12-02)

Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties. (2020-12-02)

New study links number of menopause symptoms with job performance
With a large percentage of women in the workplace aged between 40 and 59 years, the challenge of women managing menopause symptoms while at work is commonplace. A new study examined the relationship between the number of menopause symptoms and the job performance of working women. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-12-01)

Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience. A recent study is the first to examine divorcees immediately after a divorce and finds that their mental and physical health is reduced, with conflict emerging a key factor. The results could help researchers to design interventions to support divorcees through their divorce. (2020-11-30)

Why spending a long time on your phone isn't bad for mental health
General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes. Researchers measured the time spent on smartphones by 199 iPhone users and 46 Android users for one week. Surprisingly, the amount of time spent on the smartphone was not related to poor mental health. Instead, the study found that mental health was associated with concerns and worries about their own smartphone usage. (2020-11-30)

More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a University of Alberta study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected. (2020-11-30)

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