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Current Physicians News and Events, Physicians News Articles.
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Associations between burnout and practice organization in family physicians
With the rate of burnout as high as 63% among family physicians, it is important to identify risk factors for physician burnout. The relationship between burnout and personal environmental and organizational risk factors was examined in a study of family physicians. (2019-11-12)

Australia's rural doctors speak up to boost regional health services
A national study has found that longer rural doctor postings and more rural training positions are needed to provide regional areas with the right doctor, at the right time and in the right place. (2019-11-05)

Survey reveals the hidden costs of care cascades
Just about any medical test can turn up an incidental finding that leads to a cascade of follow-up tests. Through a national survey of physicians, investigators from the Brigham have found that 99% of physicians have experienced these cascades of care firsthand and report that such cascades have caused their patients psychological harm, physical harm and financial burden and have caused frustration and anxiety for physicians. (2019-10-29)

Study examines care for knee osteoarthritis in the United States
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research provides an overview of US physicians' recommendations for physical therapy, lifestyle counseling, pain medications for treating knee osteoarthritis. (2019-10-09)

Inconsistencies between electronic health record, physicians' observed behaviors
A study of nine emergency department residents reports inconsistencies between the electronic medical record and physicians' behaviors observed and recorded during patient encounters. Resident physicians were shadowed by trained observers for 20 encounters in this study conducted at emergency departments in two academic medical centers. The study quantified the review of systems (when patients are asked questions about different organs) and physical examinations documented by physicians and what observers confirmed. (2019-09-18)

Study changes guidelines for sepsis management
University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management. (2019-09-17)

Research shows TCOM and osteopathic approach making a difference
The 2.5-year study, conducted by the PRECISION Pain Research Registry and TCOM's John Licciardone, D.O., M.S., M.B.A., reaffirmed the importance of empathy and better interpersonal manner when treating patients with chronic pain. (2019-08-19)

Early-career female physicians experience obstacles to professional and academic success
Individual and systemic challenges specific to female family physicians in their first five years of practice create obstacles that can result in disproportionate rates of burnout and negative impacts on career trajectories, according to a new paper co-authored by Dr. Tali Bogler of St. Michael's Hospital's Academic Family Health Team. (2019-08-14)

Professional coaching alleviates burnout symptoms in physicians
Medical doctors in the United States are twice as likely to experience symptoms of burnout as other workers, which can compromise quality of care and place patients at risk. In a study in JAMA Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic researchers suggest a new approach to fighting burnout: external professional coaching. (2019-08-05)

Burnout symptoms associated with racial bias in medical residents
Mayo Clinic researchers have found an association between increased symptoms of burnout and heightened racial bias in medical residents. The study appears in JAMA Network Open. 'When physicians aren't operating in an optimal mental and emotional state, they may find it harder to push back against their own biases,' says Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., who led the study. 'If burnout contributes to disparities in care, perhaps fighting burnout can help narrow that gap.' (2019-07-26)

Survey finds patients want more guidance from physicians on self-care
Physicians and consumers agree that self-care is important to health, yet 75% of patients say they haven't discussed it with their physician within the last two years, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Nearly half of doctors (46%) say patients don't seem interested in the topic, while a most patients (72%) say they are interested in discussing self-care with their physician. (2019-07-23)

Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care
Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Lack of time, job demands, family demands, being too tired and burnout are the most common reasons for not practicing their desired amount of self-care. (2019-07-23)

Patients want physicians more involved in their health outside of the doctor's office
A media briefing on a nationwide survey of physicians and consumers conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs on:How consumers and physicians define self-care. Whether physicians agree that self-care is a critical component of their patients' health. The disconnect between what physicians and their patients say they want to discuss regarding self-care. How Americans view and prioritize self-care, and what they do to practice it. Barriers for practicing self-care. (2019-07-22)

New research finds private practice physicians less likely to maintain electronic records
The research led by Jordan Everson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), finds striking differences in use of electronic health records (EHRs) among more than 291,000 physicians included in the study. (2019-07-19)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

Training trials
First national study shows cutting residents' training hours has not resulted in lower performance for new doctors. Resident training was capped at 80 hours per week in 2003, down from 100+ hours, a controversial move that left many worried. Despite worries, reduced hours did not change 30-day patient mortality, readmissions or spending. (2019-07-11)

'Flash mob' study puts clinical decision rules for ACS to the test
A novel 'flash mob' study finds that, in emergency care, acute coronary syndrome cannot be safely ruled out using the Marburg Heart Score or the family physicians' clinical assessment. (2019-07-10)

Caught in the middle: Family physicians discuss their role in the opioid crisis
Family physicians prescribe the greatest volume of opioids (22.9%) and number of prescriptions (31.2%) to individuals with chronic noncancer pain, making them targets for quality improvements in safer prescribing practices. (2019-07-10)

Are physical examinations really necessary?
As technology has gained ground in medicine and critics have called into question the diagnostic accuracy of physical examinations, what place does the practice of the physical exam have in today's clinic? (2019-07-10)

Doctors need nutrition education, says commentary in JAMA Internal Medicine
Overweight, diabetes, heart disease, and many forms of cancer are driven by unhealthful diets, but most doctors do not have the knowledge to turn this problem around. (2019-07-02)

Inexpensive equipment and training can improve melanoma detection and reduce biopsies
Researchers say non-dermatologist physicians can make earlier and more accurate diagnoses of melanomas using a dermatoscope. This would be particularly beneficial for patients who lack access to dermatologists, the authors noted, because primary care physicians typically biopsy suspicious spots or refer patients to a specialist. (2019-07-01)

Gender bias alive and well in health care roles, study shows
Results of a multi-center study of patients' assumptions about health care professionals' roles based on gender show significant stereotypical bias towards males as physicians and females as nurses. The research team, led in New Orleans by Lisa Moreno-Walton, MD, LSU Health New Orleans Emergency Medicine at University Medical Center (UMC), found patients recognized males as physicians nearly 76% of the time. Female attending physicians were recognized as physicians only 58% of the time. (2019-07-01)

Terminally ill who request doctors make decisions undergo more aggressive final treatments
Terminally ill patients who request that physicians make decisions on their behalf are more likely to receive aggressive treatments in the weeks before they die, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, is the first to examine if personal beliefs and attitudes of both patients and physicians affect end-of-life treatments that can be painful and risky. (2019-06-18)

What influences critical care doctors in withdrawing life support for patients with brain injury?
Decisions to withdraw life support treatments in critically ill patients with severe brain injury are complicated, are based on many factors, and are usually made by critical care physicians and families in the intensive care unit. A study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides new understanding on the decision-making processes for this patient population, which accounts for most hospital deaths from trauma. (2019-06-17)

VA study backs use of physician assistants, nurse practitioners in diabetes care
VA patients with diabetes have similar health outcomes regardless of whether their primary provider is a physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant, according to a Durham VA Health Care System study. (2019-06-07)

Race could be a determinant in physician-patient interactions and pain treatment in cancer
A 62-year-old with stage IV lung cancer that has spread to his bones, causing unspeakable pain, is trying to convince his physician to prescribe pain medicine. What happens next? It actually could depend on if the patient is black or white. Or if the physician is a primary care provider or an oncologist. Yes, race and other factors could play a role, according to a new study conducted by researchers and recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2019-06-06)

Newfound autoimmune syndrome causes muscle pain, weakness
A previously unknown autoimmune muscle disease involving sudden onset of debilitating muscle pain and weakness has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The syndrome easily could be mistaken for other muscle diseases that require different treatment, so the findings are expected to help physicians treat patients appropriately, the researchers said. (2019-06-03)

Eliminating extended work shifts improves sleep duration for senior resident physicians
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital comparing the work hours and sleep obtained by pediatric resident physicians working extended shifts with those whose scheduled shift lengths were limited to no more than 16 consecutive hours found that hours of sleep per week increased under a modified schedule. The team's results are presented today at the American Thoracic Meeting and simultaneously published in Sleep. (2019-05-20)

In rural areas, buprenorphine is provided by primary care clinicians
As the United States undertakes intense efforts to increase the number of prescribers of buprenorphine for opioid use disorder, it is critical to understand who currently provides such treatment and how. (2019-05-14)

HIV epidemic stubbornly persists despite proven tool to prevent spread
A new survey of more than 200 Internal Medicine residents indicates that more than half rated their knowledge of a proven medication to prevent the spread of HIV as only poor or fair. (2019-05-08)

Five things to know about physician suicide
Physician suicide is an urgent problem with rates higher than suicide rates in the general public, with potential for extensive impact on health care systems. A 'Five things to know about ...' practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides an overview of this serious issue. (2019-05-06)

Lots of patients with cancer, cancer survivors use but don't report complementary/alternative medicine therapies
This study used data from a nationwide survey to estimate how many patients with cancer and cancer survivors use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMS) in addition to or instead of conventional therapies, and how many don't disclose that to their physicians. (2019-04-11)

How common are advanced care planning conversations with hospitalized, older patients?
A research team from Dartmouth College analyzed advanced care planning (ACP) billing at a national physician practice and found that despite incentives, the rate of ACP-billed conversations was low and varied greatly among physicians and practice sites. (2019-04-01)

Improving equity in global physician training
Large numbers of U.S. physicians and medical trainees engage in hands-on clinical experiences abroad where they gain skills working across cultures with limited resources. However, providers from low- and middle-income countries traveling to learn from health care in the United States are rarely afforded the same critical hands-on education. (2019-03-28)

Student loan forgiveness programs driving physicians to primary care
A 2016 survey of graduating osteopathic medical students showed 33 percent intended to work in primary care. That represents an 18 percent increase from 2007, when only 28 percent of osteopathic medical students indicated a future career in primary care. (2019-03-26)

JAMA viewpoint: Physicians' trust in one another is a care safety and quality issue
While the importance of trusted relationships between patients and their physicians is taken for granted, little attention has been given to the relationships among physicians themselves. Yet the interactions between, for example, a patient's primary care physician and cardiologist or between a patient's pediatrician and an oncology team, are essential to the safety and quality of care for patients and the resilience of physicians and other healthcare professionals. (2019-03-22)

Less burnout seen among US physicians, Stanford researcher says
The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association. (2019-02-22)

Physician well-being improving, but burnout risk remains
The good news is that physician burnout appears to be improving, along with indicators for physician well-being. However, physicians remain at high risk for burnout, depression and depersonalization, compared to other professionals. (2019-02-22)

Primary care physician supply and life expectancy
This study used U.S. population data to identify changes in the supply of primary care physicians across counties from 2005 to 2015 and the association with life expectancy and other outcomes. A greater supply of primary care physicians was associated with better life expectancy but the per capita supply of primary care physicians across counties decreased, mostly because of disproportionate losses in some counties and population increases in general. (2019-02-18)

Some primary care doctors not prepared to help with cancer treatment decisions
Research has shown patients are discussing initial cancer treatment options with their primary care doctors. And now a new study finds that a significant number of these physicians report notable gaps in their knowledge of cancer treatment options. (2019-02-12)

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