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Current Physics News and Events, Physics News Articles.
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New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer
For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument. (2019-05-20)
Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size
A multidisciplinary team has provided new insight into underlying mechanisms controlling the precise size of cells. (2019-05-16)
Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust
Digital quantum simulators may be used to solve quantum-physical problems in many-body systems, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems and short times. (2019-05-14)
Great chocolate is a complex mix of science, physicists reveal
The science of what makes good chocolate has been revealed by researchers studying a 140-year-old mixing technique. (2019-05-08)
Experimental device generates electricity from the coldness of the universe
A drawback of solar panels is that they require sunlight to generate electricity. (2019-05-06)
Quantum sensor for photons
A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost. (2019-05-03)
Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory
Currently, information on a computer is encoded by magnetic fields, a process that requires substantial energy and generates waste heat. (2019-05-02)
Searching for lost WWII-era uranium cubes from Germany
In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, 'Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. (2019-05-01)
Scientists develop new model to describe how bacteria spread in different forms
A new model describing how bacteria spread when moving in two different forms has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2019-04-30)
The search for nothing at all
In a new set of results published April 29, 2019 in the journal Nature, Bill Fairbank and his team at Colorado State University have laid the foundation for a single-atom illumination strategy called barium tagging. (2019-04-29)
Liquid crystals in nanopores produce a surprisingly large negative pressure
Negative pressure governs not only the Universe or the quantum vacuum. (2019-04-24)
Water walking -- The new mode of rock skipping
Utah State University's Splash Lab not only reveals the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water, but it also lays the foundation for the future design of water-walking drones. (2019-04-23)
Wakeup call: Pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its effect on female physics students
A recent study revealed that sexual harassment in physics is insidious and experienced at a significantly higher rate than is generally acknowledged. (2019-04-22)
Thermodynamic magic enables cooling without energy consumption
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. (2019-04-19)
When the physics say 'don't follow your nose'
Engineers at Duke University are developing a smart robotic system for sniffing out pollution hotspots and sources of toxic leaks. (2019-04-18)
University of Barcelona researchers develop new variant of Maxwell's demon at nanoscale
Maxwell's demon is a machine proposed by James Clerk Maxwell in 1897. (2019-04-17)
Quantum simulation more stable than expected
A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. (2019-04-12)
Amorphous materials will be used in medical and industrial applications
In this particular paper, Dr. Mokshin's group studied the influence of supercooling on the structure and morphology of the crystalline nuclei arising and growing within a liquid metallic film. (2019-04-08)
The cost of computation
There's been a rapid resurgence of interest in understanding the energy cost of computing. (2019-04-08)
Insects in freezing regions have a protein that acts like antifreeze
The power to align water molecules is usually held by ice, which affects nearby water and encourages it to join the ice layer. (2019-04-02)
Turbulences theory closer high-energy physics than previously thought
A new research paper finds the high-energy physics concept of 'un-naturalness' may be applicable to the study of turbulence or that of strongly correlated systems of elementary particles. (2019-04-02)
'Featherweight oxygen' discovery opens window on nuclear symmetry
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered and characterized a new form of oxygen dubbed 'featherweight oxygen' -- the lightest-ever version of the familiar chemical element oxygen, with only three neutrons to its eight protons. (2019-04-01)
Quantum optical cooling of nanoparticles
One important requirement to see quantum effects is to remove all thermal energy from the particle motion, i.e. to cool it as close as possible to absolute zero temperature. (2019-03-29)
Ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems show promise for ultrahigh-speed spintronics
In the future, ultrahigh-speed spintronics will require ultrafast coherent magnetization reversal within a picosecond. (2019-03-28)
Stanford autonomous car learns to handle unknown conditions
In order to make autonomous cars navigate more safely in difficult conditions -- like icy roads -- researchers are developing new control systems that learn from real-world driving experiences while leveraging insights from physics. (2019-03-27)
Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II
The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. (2019-03-25)
Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size
Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. (2019-03-25)
Heading towards a tsunami of light
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. (2019-03-19)
Artificial intelligence learns to predict elementary particle signals
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex have developed a method that accelerates the simulation of processes at the Large Hadron Collider. (2019-03-14)
Looking back and forward: A decadelong quest for a transformative transistor
Transistors have been miniaturized for the past 50 years, but we've reached the point where they can't continue to be scaled any further. (2019-03-13)
Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?
A new study published in Physical Review Letters by Prof. (2019-03-12)
Physicists use supercomputers to solve 50-year-old beta decay puzzle
Beta decay plays an indispensable role in the universe. And for 50 years it has held onto a secret that puzzled nuclear physicists. (2019-03-11)
Spontaneous spin polarization demonstrated in a two-dimensional material
Physicists from the University of Basel have demonstrated spin alignment of free electrons within a two-dimensional material. (2019-03-11)
Light from an exotic crystal semiconductor could lead to better solar cells
Scientists have found a new way to control light emitted by exotic crystal semiconductors, which could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Today. (2019-03-06)
Scientists study neutron scattering for researching magnetic materials
Physicists from the University of Luxembourg and their research partners have demonstrated for the first time in a comprehensive study how different magnetic materials can be examined using neutron scattering techniques. (2019-03-05)
Scientists levitate particles with sound to find out how they cluster together
Scientists from the University of Chicago and the University of Bath used sound waves to levitate particles, revealing new insights about how materials cluster together in the absence of gravity -- principles which underlie everything from how molecules assemble to the very early stages of planet formation from space dust. (2019-03-05)
A study by the UC3M researches the limits of topological insulators using sound waves
Research in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is taking part analyses the future of topological insulators using sound waves, meaning materials that behave like acoustic insulators in their interior, but at the same time allow the movement of sound waves at their surface. (2019-03-05)
New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing
Researchers have created a new device that allows them to probe the interference of quasiparticles, potentially paving the way for the development of topological qubits. (2019-03-04)
A trap for positrons
For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) have succeeded in losslessly guiding positrons, the antiparticles of electrons, into a magnetic field trap. (2019-02-28)
Yale researchers create a 'universal entangler' for new quantum tech
One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. (2019-02-27)
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