Current Piezoelectric News and Events

Current Piezoelectric News and Events, Piezoelectric News Articles.
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NTUsg researchers develop flexible piezoelectric crystal
A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines. (2021-02-08)

New piezoelectric material remains effective to high temperatures
Piezoelectric materials hold great promise as sensors and as energy harvesters but are normally much less effective at high temperatures, limiting their use in environments such as engines or space exploration. However, a new piezoelectric device developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and QorTek remains highly effective at elevated temperatures. (2021-02-03)

Highly deformable piezoelectric nanotruss for tactile electronics
A KAIST research team confirmed the potential of tactile devices by developing ceramic piezoelectric materials that are three times more deformable. For the fabrication of highly deformable nanomaterials, the research team built a zinc oxide hollow nanostructure using proximity field nanopatterning and atomic layered deposition. (2021-02-01)

Optical scanner design for adaptive driving beam systems can lead to safer night driving
In a recent study published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems, researchers from Japan have come up with an alternative to conventional adaptive driving beam systems: a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanner that relies on the piezoelectric effect of electrically induced mechanical vibrations. (2021-01-27)

Could "Power Walking" fuel the energy revolution? India is ready to step up
India has an energy problem. It currently relies heavily on coal and consumer demand is expected to double by 2040, making its green energy targets look out of reach. Part of the solution could come from harvesting energy from footsteps, say Hari Anand and Binod Kumar Singh from the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. Their new study, published in the De Gruyter journal Energy Harvesting and Systems, shows that Indian attitudes towards power generated through piezoelectric tiles are overwhelmingly positive. (2021-01-19)

Sound waves spin droplets to concentrate, separate nanoparticles
Mechanical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for spinning individual droplets of liquid to concentrate and separate nanoparticles for biomedical purposes. The technique is much more efficient than traditional centrifuge approaches, working its magic in under a minute instead of taking hours or days, and requires only a tiny fraction of the typical sample size. The invention could underline new approaches to applications ranging from precision bioassays to cancer diagnosis. (2020-12-18)

Getting the right grip: Designing soft and sensitive robotic fingers
To develop a more human-like robotic gripper, it is necessary to provide sensing capabilities to the fingers. However, conventional sensors compromise the mechanical properties of soft robots. Now, scientists at Ritsumeikan University, Japan, design a 3D printable soft robotic finger containing a built-in sensor with adjustable stiffness. Their work represents a big step toward safer and more dexterous robotic handling, which will extend the applications of robots to fields such as health and elderly care. (2020-12-10)

Clothing, tattoos could be used to monitor patient health
A shirt that monitors your blood pressure or a pair of socks that can keep track of your cholesterol levels might be just a few years away from becoming reality. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers examine the use of microfibers and nanofibers as wearable monitors that could keep track of a patient's vital signs. The microfiber- and nanofiber-based technology addresses growing concerns in the medical community about monitoring chronic illnesses as the population ages. (2020-12-01)

Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

New type of ultrahigh piezoelectricity in hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics
A new strategy is proposed to generate ultra-high piezoelectric coefficients, and many hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics (e.g., organic PhMDA) can be ideal candidates owing to the specific features of hydrogen bonding. Their Curie temperature can be approximately doubled upon a tensile strain as low as 2 %, which can be tuned exactly to room-temperature by fixing a strain in one direction, and in another direction, an unprecedented ultra-high piezoelectric coefficient can be obtained. (2020-11-20)

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has developed self-powered sensors that can run for more than a year. (2020-11-16)

Swirl power: how gentle body movement will charge your mobile phone
Scientists have discovered a way to generate electricity from nylon - the stretchy fabric used widely in sportswear and other shape-hugging apparel - raising hopes that the clothes on our backs will become an important source of energy. (2020-11-06)

An underwater navigation system powered by sound
Underwater backscatter localization developed at MIT could allow for battery-free ocean exploration. The system is akin to subsea GPS and has potential applications in marine conservation, aquaculture, underwater robotics, and more. (2020-11-02)

PLUS takes 3D ultrasound images of solids
A two-in-one technology provides 3D images of structural defects, such as those that can develop in aircraft and power plants. (2020-09-25)

Engineers imitate human hands to make better sensors
An international research team has developed ''electronic skin'' sensors capable of mimicking the dynamic process of human motion. This work could help severely injured people, such as soldiers, regain the ability to control their movements, as well as contribute to the development of smart robotics, according to Huanyu ''Larry'' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Early Career Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics. (2020-09-21)

Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector. It is based on miniaturized photonic circuits on top of a silicon chip. With a size 100 times smaller than an average human hair, the new detector can visualize features that are much smaller than previously possible, leading to what is known as super-resolution imaging. (2020-09-16)

Energy harvesting goes organic, gets more flexible
The race is on to create natural biocompatible piezoelectric materials for energy harvesting, electronic sensing, and stimulating nerves. A group of researchers has explored peptide-based nanotubes and, in the Journal of Applied Physics, reports using a combination of ultraviolet and ozone exposure to generate a wettability difference and an applied field to create horizontally aligned polarization of nanotubes on flexible substrates with interlocking electrodes. The work will enable the use of organic materials more widely. (2020-09-15)

Building mechanical memory boards using origami
Origami can be used to create mechanical, binary switches, and in Applied Physics Letters, researchers report the fabrication of such a paper device, using the Kresling pattern, that can act as a mechanical switch. By putting several together on a single platform, the investigators built a functioning mechanical memory board. They found that oscillating the platform up and down at a certain speed will cause it to flip, or switch, between its two stable states. (2020-08-25)

A touch of gold sends crystals electric with excitement
A touch of gold - or another noble metal - can change the structure of a crystal and its intrinsic properties, physicists at the University of Warwick have demonstrated in a display of modern-day alchemy. (2020-08-19)

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision. (2020-08-13)

Researchers demonstrate fundamentally new approach to ultrasound imaging
Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for creating ultrasound images. The new approach is substantially simpler than existing techniques and could significantly drive down technology costs. (2020-08-13)

Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Nano a high-speed atomic-force microscopy study of the formation of protein fibrils (amyloids) associated with pathologies in collaborated research with Showa University. Mixing different variants of a single protein and changing the acidity of its environment is shown to result in significant variations in amyloid structure and elongation rates. (2020-08-03)

How human sperm really swim: New research challenges centuries-old assumption
A breakthrough in fertility science by researchers from Bristol and Mexico has shattered the universally accepted view of how sperm 'swim'. (2020-07-31)

Physicists find ways to control gamma radiation
Researchers from Kazan Federal University, Texas A&M University and Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences) found ways to direct high frequency gamma radiation by means of acoustics. (2020-07-21)

Shaking light with sound
Combining integrated photonics and MEMS technology, scientists from EPFL and Purdue University demonstrate monolithic piezoelectric control of integrated optical frequency combs with bulk acoustic waves. The technology opens up integrated ultrafast acousto-optic modulation for demanding applications. (2020-07-15)

Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide
An RMIT-UNSW collaboration applies liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements. Piezoelectric materials such as atomically-thin tin-monosulfide (SnS) convert mechanical forces or movement into electrical energy. Along with their inherent flexibility, this makes them candidates for flexible nanogenerators in wearable electronics or internal, self-powered biosensors. (2020-07-10)

Energy-saving servers: Data storage 2.0
A research team of Mainz University has developed a technique that will potentially halve the energy required to write data to servers and make it easier to construct complex server architectures. (2020-07-01)

Buzzing to rebuild broken bone
Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers report. Although minor bone breaks usually heal on their own, large fractures with shattered or missing chunks of bone are more difficult to repair. A biocompatible, dissolving polymer device can mimic the body's natural electrical field and help the cells regenerate. (2020-06-30)

Understanding of relaxor ferroelectric properties could lead to many advances
A new fundamental understanding of polymeric relaxor ferroelectric behavior could lead to advances in flexible electronics, actuators and transducers, energy storage, piezoelectric sensors and electrocaloric cooling, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State. (2020-06-29)

Rice team makes tiny, magnetically powered neural stimulator
Rice University neuroengineers have created a tiny surgical implant that can electrically stimulate the brain and nervous system without using a battery or wired power supply. (2020-06-08)

2D oxide flakes pick up surprise electrical properties
Rice University researchers find evidence of piezoelectricity in lab-grown, two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum dioxide. (2020-05-07)

Magnetoacoustic waves: Towards a new paradigm of on-chip communication
Researchers have observed directly and for the first time magnetoacoustic waves (sound-driven spin waves), which are considered as potential information carriers for novel computation schemes. These waves have been generated and observed on hybrid magnetic/piezoelectric devices. The experiments were designed by a collaboration between the University of Barcelona (UB), the Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC) and the ALBA Synchrotron. The results show that magnetoacoustic waves can travel over long distances -up to centimeters- and have larger amplitudes than expected. (2020-04-06)

Scientists tap unused energy source to power smart sensor networks
The electricity that lights our homes and powers our appliances also creates small magnetic fields that are present all around us. Scientists have developed a new mechanism capable of harvesting this wasted magnetic field energy and converting it into enough electricity to power next-generation sensor networks for smart buildings and factories. (2020-03-31)

Controllable functional ferroelectric domain walls under piezoresponse microscope
Although ferroelectric bulk materials have excellent photoelectric, piezoelectric and dielectric properties, they could hardly meet the increasing need for integrated, micro-sized and wearable devices. As a functional two-dimensional structure, possessing distinctive electric, magnetic, optic and mechanical properties, ferroelectric domain walls have attracted widespread attention in recent years, yet the lack of maneuverability holds off their potential application. Scientists from China and America study the domain wall dynamics statistically and manipulate them successfully. (2020-02-06)

Acousto-optic modulation of photonic bound state in the continuum
Applying bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic integrated circuits enables low-loss light guidance and routing in low-refractive-index waveguides on high-refractive-index substrates. Here, we demonstrate high-quality integrated lithium niobate microcavities with circulating BICs and further acousto-optically modulate these BICs by surface acoustic waves. The acousto-optic coupling is well situated in the resolved-sideband regime, which leads to coherent coupling between microwave and optical photons, as exhibited by the observed electro-acousto-optically induced transparency and absorption. (2020-01-22)

Smart materials are becoming smarter
Composites are a new type of materials that consist of heterogeneous components (metals, ceramics, glass, plastic, carbon, etc.) and combine their properties. To create such a material, a filler with certain stability and rigidity is placed into a flexible matrix. Various compositions and matrix-filler ratios create a wide range of materials with given sets of characteristics. (2020-01-20)

Transparency discovered in crystals with ultrahigh piezoelectricity
Use of an AC rather than a DC electric field can improve the piezoelectric response of a crystal. Now, an international team of researchers say that cycles of AC fields also make the internal crystal domains in some materials bigger and the crystal transparent. (2020-01-15)

Scientists transform a BBQ lighter into a high-tech lab device
Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator -- which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls -- from inexpensive components, including a piezoelectric crystal taken from a butane lighter. (2020-01-09)

Mechanical force as a new way of starting chemical reactions
Researchers have shown mechanical force can start chemical reactions, making them cheaper, more broadly applicable, and more environmentally friendly than conventional methods. (2019-12-19)

Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop
A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking. (2019-11-20)

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