Current Plankton News and Events

Current Plankton News and Events, Plankton News Articles.
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Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators
Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research, led by Newcastle University and published in in the journal Science Advances, has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean. (2021-02-19)

Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot
A never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change. It highlights, for the first time, a unique link between the diet and distribution of species across the marine realm. (2021-02-17)

New factor in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean identified
The Southern Ocean is one of the key regions for understanding the climate system. The photosynthesis-performing plankton there contribute significantly to controlling the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. But which factors favor or limit plankton growth? Researchers have now published a study showing for the first time that, in addition to the micronutrient iron, manganese can play an important role. Among other things, the results have implications for understanding ice ages in the past. (2021-02-09)

Scientists discover ocean 'surface slicks' are nurseries for diverse fishes
Ocean features called surface slicks are an interconnected superhighway of nursery habitat for more than 100 species of fishes from diverse ocean habitats. (2021-02-04)

Hidden world just below the surface
A team of scientists from NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Arizona State University and elsewhere have discovered that a diverse array of marine animals find refuge in so-called 'surface slicks' in Hawai'i. These ocean features create a superhighway of nursery habitat for more than 100 species of commercially and ecologically important fishes, such as mahi-mahi, jacks, and billfish. Their findings were published today in the journal Scientific Reports. (2021-02-04)

Potentially toxic plankton algae may play a crucial role in the future Arctic
As the sea ice shrinks in the Arctic, the plankton community that produces food for the entire marine food chain is changing. New research shows that a potentially toxic species of plankton algae that lives both by doing photosynthesis and absorbing food may become an important player in the Arctic Ocean as the future sea ice becomes thinner and thinner. (2021-02-03)

Are plastics and microplastics in the Ocean on the increase?
A cohort of high-profile co-authors posed this question in a study recently published in the Microplastics and Nanoplastics journal. (2021-02-01)

Marine organisms use previously undiscovered receptors to detect, respond to light
Single-celled organisms in the open ocean use a diverse array of newly discovered genetic tools to detect light, even in tiny amounts, and respond. (2021-02-01)

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture. (2021-01-15)

Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Seals native to Siberia's Lake Baikal have been found to have a remarkable adaptation in their teeth that has allowed them to prosper even in the face of limited nutrient offerings. (2020-11-30)

Decaying jellyfish blooms can cause temporary changes to water column food webs
Decaying jellyfish blooms fuel the rapid growth of just a few specific strains of seawater bacteria, causing temporary changes to the water column food web. This is the finding of a new study furthering our understanding of how jellyfish blooms, which are happening with increasing frequency, impact marine ecosystems. It details these fast-growing bacteria effectively reduce the amount of jellyfish detrital material reaching the seafloor, keeping it instead within the water column food web. (2020-10-30)

The uncertain future of the oceans
Marine food webs and biogeochemical cycles react very sensitively to the increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) - but the effects are far more complex than previously thought. This is shown in a study published by a team of researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel in the journal Nature Climate Change. Data were combined from five large-scale field experiments, which investigated how the carbon cycle within plankton communities reacts to the increase of CO2. (2020-10-26)

Extinctions linked to new assemblages of species
As the world undergoes profound environmental change, identifying and protecting 'novel' communities of species can help prevent extinctions within vulnerable ecosystems. Scientists outline a world first method to detect 'novel' communities of species across all ecosystems. (2020-10-08)

Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world
A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives. (2020-10-05)

Predator-prey interaction study reveals more food does not always mean more consumption
Decades of data allow researchers at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center to look at predator-prey interactions in a different way: among multiple species throughout the water column. They have developed an unusually rich picture of who is eating whom off the Northeastern United States. (2020-09-30)

Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities
A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification. (2020-09-30)

SwRI scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
SAN ANTONIO -- Sept. 16, 2020 -- A Southwest Research Institute scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos. She has developed techniques to identify stars likely to host exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets, and proposes that upcoming studies target stellar phosphorus to find systems with the greatest probability for hosting life as we know it. (2020-09-16)

Discovery of a new mass extinction
It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record. In a new paper, published today in Science Advances, an international team has identified a major extinction of life 233 million years ago that triggered the dinosaur takeover of the world. The crisis has been called the Carnian Pluvial Episode. (2020-09-16)

Stanford researchers develop new way to study ocean life
Insights from innovative device could provide a new window into secrets of microscopic ocean life and their effects on crucial planetary processes, such as carbon fixation. (2020-08-17)

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems. (2020-06-24)

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)

Climate change has degraded productivity of shelf sea food webs
Released to coincide with World Oceans Day, new research led by the University of Plymouth has shown that a shortage of summer nutrients -- a result of our changing climate -- has contributed to a 50% decline in important North East Atlantic plankton over the past 60 years. (2020-06-07)

Dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during industrial era
There has been a dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during the 20th century, in contrast to thousands of years of stability, according to a new UCL-led study. (2020-04-23)

Artificial light in the arctic
A new study examine how artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behavior down to 200 meters in depth, which could affect fish counts. (2020-04-06)

Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities
New research published in Global Change Biology shows that some species have experienced a 75% population decrease in the past 60 years, while others are more than twice as abundant due to rises in sea surface temperatures. (2020-04-01)

Arctic light pollution affects fish, zooplankton up to 200 metres deep
If artificial light shines into the Arctic Ocean during the polar night, does it matter? A new paper in Communications Biology says the answer to this is a strong yes. (2020-03-23)

Observing phytoplankton via satellite
Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and the ramifications for the fishing industry. (2020-03-19)

Cryo-EM reveals unexpected diversity of photosystems
Annemarie Perez Boerema from Alexey Amunts lab reconstructed the atomic models of new forms of Photosystem I in collaboration with scientists from Israel and China. The studies, published in two Nature Plants articles, expand on the fundamental understanding of how bioenergetic complexes are assembled and regulated in the photosynthetic membranes of cyanobacteria and algae. (2020-03-09)

Tissue-digging nanodrills do just enough damage
Scientists show light-activated molecular drills effectively kill cells in whole eukaryotic organisms. The drills developed at Rice University, designed to target drug-resistant bacteria, cancer and other disease-causing cells, can now be used to kill whole organisms and drill into skin for therapeutic treatment. (2020-03-05)

mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone
Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump -- a major climate regulator -- a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans. (2020-02-13)

Mediterranean sea urchins are more vulnerable than previously thought
The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an eatable species of great commercial interest found in the Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic, is more vulnerable than so far believed. This is stated in a study by the University of Barcelona, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the University of Tromsø (Norway) on the genetic distribution of populations of this species. (2020-02-07)

UCI oceanographers predict increase in phytoplankton by 2100
A neural network-driven Earth system model has led University of California, Irvine oceanographers to a surprising conclusion: phytoplankton populations will grow in low-latitude waters by the end of the 21st century. (2020-01-27)

Tiny, but effective
Barely visible to the naked eye, gelatinous zooplankton is an important part of the marine ecosystem. In addition, the small organisms also transport large quantities of carbon into deeper layers of the ocean, thus making an important contribution to marine carbon transport. This is underpinned by new studies by an international team of researchers recently published in the renowned journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles. (2020-01-08)

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean
In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average -- with the seafood supply in the crosshairs. (2019-12-16)

Deciphering the equations of life
Research led by the University of Arizona has resulted in a set of equations that describes and predicts commonalities across life despite its enormous diversity. The new theory allows predictions for organisms that might not be well understood by science. (2019-12-11)

Marine community composition shifts in predictable ways in warming oceans
Global simulations suggest plankton and fish species are showing resilience to climate change by going deeper underwater or moving to higher latitudes. (2019-11-25)

Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, covers species that are important for fisheries and that serve as food for fish, such as copepods and other zooplankton. (2019-11-25)

The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. So say an international group of scientists in the most comprehensive assessment of the effects of ocean warming on the distribution fish communities. (2019-11-25)

Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. An international research team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has investigated ice samples worldwide. A key result is that only a small part of the glacier ice contaminated with sediment contains large amounts of iron, while the vast majority of clean ice contains very little iron. The study was published today in the international journal Nature Communications. (2019-11-20)

Two ocean studies look at microscopic diversity and activity across entire planet
Two Cell papers use samples and data collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition to analyze current ocean diversity across the planet, providing a baseline to better understand climate change's impact on the oceans. In a Perspective publishing in the journal One Earth, Claudet et al. examine the barriers that have prevented ocean sustainability policy changes so far and suggest strategies for leveraging the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development to overcome these challenges. (2019-11-14)

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